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Irish Man In The Us Tells It Like It Is.

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A US financial reporter asks a Irish man on the street what his views are on the current problems.

Warning: Includes bad language.

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Very good, caught it on the other thread.

He seemed very annoyed about the Michael Flatley comment

Who is Michael Flatley... is he the chancellor ?

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What I'm impressed about is that 'the man in the Street' understands what has happened. This is a function of them not printing and not pressing interest rates to the floor, raping savers. It will change their future behaviours.

Whereas here...what can you say. People stay in ignorance - have no concept of the underlying problems as they are hidden from direct view. And you can't make things better unless you can directly see the problem to be tackled. The economic policy of the coward. Was it ever thus since the early twentieth century.

Educating yourself has always been a big part of Irish life... being well read used to be a Celtic positive forced on most by circumstance...

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What I'm impressed about is that 'the man in the Street' understands what has happened. This is a function of them not printing and not pressing interest rates to the floor, raping savers. It will change their future behaviours.

Whereas here...what can you say. People stay in ignorance - have no concept of the underlying problems as they are hidden from direct view. And you can't make things better unless you can directly see the problem to be tackled. The economic policy of the coward. Was it ever thus since the early twentieth century.

This guy isn't man in the street - Denis Ryan, folk singer turned "financier".

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an old one stored in my cookies file :

-------------------------------------------------

A site foreman is becoming increasingly frustrated with an Irish labourer;

"You are so stupid you don't know the difference between girders and joists"

"Begorrah, sorr, 'tis sure I do. Goethe wrote Faust and Joyce wrote Ulysses."

<needs telling with the appropriate irish accent>

--------------------------------------------------

dont know where I got it from so cant ack the source

rockhopper

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Guest UK Debt Slave

That. WAS. AWESOME!!

The Irish contribution to writing is beyond superb, Yeats, Shaw, Swift, Stoker, Wilde, Doyle, Becket, Joyce it goes on an on.

What is it about the Irish and Scottish accent that makes delivery like that so Shakesperian in quality?

Bloody fantastic

Here's Jamie McDonald in the The Thick of it giving the Scottish version, albeit for theatrical effect

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8nMxNDvyVVU&feature=related

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What I'm impressed about is that 'the man in the Street' understands what has happened. This is a function of them not printing and not pressing interest rates to the floor, raping savers. It will change their future behaviours.

Whereas here...what can you say. People stay in ignorance - have no concept of the underlying problems as they are hidden from direct view. And you can't make things better unless you can directly see the problem to be tackled. The economic policy of the coward. Was it ever thus since the early twentieth century.

+ 1

A few weeks (month?) ago I saw an Irish stand-up comedian on one the BBC that had got the crisis - and explained it - much better than any of the BBC economics/business correspondents. Including blaming the whole society for indulging in a collective credit binge. (He had jokes about the "good times" mentioning that everybody was spending too much - that is why they were "good times", etc.)

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:lol::lol::lol:

Brilliant!

Thanks for that Reebo/Confounded.

:lol:

It popped up on my Facebook news feed yesterday, and I figured everyone on here would appreciate it :)

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What I'm impressed about is that 'the man in the Street' understands what has happened. This is a function of them not printing and not pressing interest rates to the floor, raping savers. It will change their future behaviours.

Whereas here...what can you say. People stay in ignorance - have no concept of the underlying problems as they are hidden from direct view.

"You are indeed, sir!" - brilliant!

So true that you'd never get any kind of response like that from a typical Brit in the street unless they were waffling about their team's prospects for the cup, or other bread/circus distractions.

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What I'm impressed about is that 'the man in the Street' understands what has happened. This is a function of them not printing and not pressing interest rates to the floor, raping savers. It will change their future behaviours.

Whereas here...what can you say. People stay in ignorance - have no concept of the underlying problems as they are hidden from direct view. And you can't make things better unless you can directly see the problem to be tackled. The economic policy of the coward. Was it ever thus since the early twentieth century.

Totally disagree. Everyone looks to blame the government, the banks etc etc. At the end of the day the truth is that the main culprits were the Irish population. They just had a classic speculative bubble in real estate and only have themselves to blame.

Just as in the UK, the general population was in a mania. Now they have woken up they say "It was the lenders. They shouldn't have lent all that money. It was the government. They should have regulated more to protect us from ourselves". It's all infantile ********. A bit like waking up with a hangover and saying "It was the pub's fault. All I had to do was ask for alcohol and they sold it to me. And it was my mates' fault. They should have told me to drink less."

That's the plain feckin' truth.

I'm not trying to be puritanical here. Wouldn't it be better if everyone partaking in the mania took personal responsibility instead? Why not laugh at themselves? "Hmmm, it all got a bit silly there. No idea how I went mad and thought I should keep borrowing more. Silly me. Ah well." Isn't that a bit more psychologically healthy?

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  • 315 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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