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You Should Never Leave An Open Tin In The Fridge.

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Right, so I'm here stuffing Branston beans in my face straight from the tin (bought in bulk while on sale for fvck all at Morrisons, of course) and remembered something my mother and grandmother told me years back. Apparently, you shouldn't put opened tins of food in the fridge as it causes something nasty to happen - problem is I don't know what or why.

Surely this is some sort of old wives tale or is there any truth to it?

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Right, so I'm here stuffing Branston beans in my face straight from the tin (bought in bulk while on sale for fvck all at Morrisons, of course) and remembered something my mother and grandmother told me years back. Apparently, you shouldn't put opened tins of food in the fridge as it causes something nasty to happen - problem is I don't know what or why.

Surely this is some sort of old wives tale or is there any truth to it?

I think they just look nasty and studenty.

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Right, so I'm here stuffing Branston beans in my face straight from the tin (bought in bulk while on sale for fvck all at Morrisons, of course) and remembered something my mother and grandmother told me years back. Apparently, you shouldn't put opened tins of food in the fridge as it causes something nasty to happen - problem is I don't know what or why.

Surely this is some sort of old wives tale or is there any truth to it?

Open tin - oxygen reacts with tin which leaches into the food - especially acidic foods - tomatoes, grapefruit, etc.

A high intake of tin can cause a stomach upset and dihorrea.

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Open tin - oxygen reacts with tin which leaches into the food - especially acidic foods - tomatoes, grapefruit, etc.

A high intake of tin can cause a stomach upset and dihorrea.

Sounds reasonable.

Actually, I've just realised that Branston beans smell just like Dominoes Pizza.

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Guest AuntJess

Open tin - oxygen reacts with tin which leaches into the food - especially acidic foods - tomatoes, grapefruit, etc.

A high intake of tin can cause a stomach upset and dihorrea.

+1

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Sounds reasonable.

Actually, I've just realised that Branston beans smell just like Dominoes Pizza.

About 10 years ago the EU lowered the permissible level of tin in food. Heinz / Campbells in response to this had to lacquer the insides of their tins with plastic - particularly as tomato soup is very acidic. When they did this they got loads of compalints because the soups had lost their characteristic zingyness!

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I've heard something about open tins and botulism. As tinned food is made without preservatives, bacteria multiply quite quickly once the tin is opened. Botulinium is found in low-acid foods. I think the danger of this is more from eating the contents of a dented or punctured tin than from leaving the food in the tin, though.

I have also heard that storing food that is part-eaten (licked utensil has been in it) is a bad idea as the bacteria multiply.

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I've heard something about open tins and botulism. As tinned food is made without preservatives, bacteria multiply quite quickly once the tin is opened. Botulinium is found in low-acid foods. I think the danger of this is more from eating the contents of a dented or punctured tin than from leaving the food in the tin, though.

I have also heard that storing food that is part-eaten (licked utensil has been in it) is a bad idea as the bacteria multiply.

The only way botulism will grow is if the tin is inadequately processed (too low temperature). Botulism will only grow in an air free environment - once there is air - botulism spores stay dormant.

As for dented tins - if the seal is broken they invariably spoil.

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I would not be too concerned myself, but food standards agency don't recommend. It is true that cans do corrode pretty quickly when exposed to the atmosphere, but tin isn't exactly the world's greatest health threat. If you believed that you'd have to start asking why they still use the stuff to coast steel when so many polymers are available.

The botulism issue is no more of a problem whether you leave the beans in th etin or take them out. Moreover factory canning temperatures exceed those needed to kill botulism, and if they did not, it would multiply inside the can to lethal levels before you even opened it.

Food Standards Agency - see last section - What you can do

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Take a tin of pineapple, eat half of it and put the rest in the fridge for 2-3 days. See if you want to eat the rest of it. The tin does oxidise and turn black which is nasty.

Pineapple juice is incredibly corrosive. You can literally cook raw pork in it.

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About 10 years ago the EU lowered the permissible level of tin in food. Heinz / Campbells in response to this had to lacquer the insides of their tins with plastic - particularly as tomato soup is very acidic. When they did this they got loads of compalints because the soups had lost their characteristic zingyness!

Exactly the reason that cider should be drunk from pewter tankards! ;)

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Never ever put an unopened tin in a microwave, I`ve heard it blows up or something.

? , surely not in that the metal particles are so close together that the wave length of the microwave beam cannot penetrate the steel liner in that the doors are peforated steel if the beams can't get through the 1mm holes they can't get through the solid surface of the tin.

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? , surely not in that the metal particles are so close together that the wave length of the microwave beam cannot penetrate the steel liner in that the doors are peforated steel if the beams can't get through the 1mm holes they can't get through the solid surface of the tin.

Never put any type of metal in a microwave. It will break your microwave.

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Right, so I'm here stuffing Branston beans in my face straight from the tin (bought in bulk while on sale for fvck all at Morrisons, of course) and remembered something my mother and grandmother told me years back. Apparently, you shouldn't put opened tins of food in the fridge as it causes something nasty to happen - problem is I don't know what or why.

Surely this is some sort of old wives tale or is there any truth to it?

Don't ever put anything in your ear but your elbow.

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? , surely not in that the metal particles are so close together that the wave length of the microwave beam cannot penetrate the steel liner in that the doors are peforated steel if the beams can't get through the 1mm holes they can't get through the solid surface of the tin.

Myth busters tried all this. Great fun.

The best effect was from two strips of aluminium foil, folded into a zig zag, and placed on their edges, parallel in the microwave. Beautiful light show. I forget if you had to have the points close together or separate, it wasn't dangerous either way but one gave the best display.

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Guest X-QUORK

Do 'tin cans' still contain tin? I thought they were ordinary steel with plastic liners these days.

That's my understanding too.

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Do 'tin cans' still contain tin? I thought they were ordinary steel with plastic liners these days.

Lots are still coated in tin. I've not seen many with polymer liners but sweetcorn seems to be one that usually is. The one I ate last night was definitely metal lined.

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I was told never to reheat rice either, but I've been doing that for 2 decades.

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Never put any type of metal in a microwave. It will break your microwave.

I thought that was a myth, certainly nothing spectacular has happened on the several occasions I've left a fork or spoon in a bowl in the microwave by mistake.

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I was told never to reheat rice either, but I've been doing that for 2 decades.

The problem with rice is that the spore forming pathogen bacillus Cereus is often present in rice.

No problem if you cook, chill rapidly and then reheat.

Problem occurs when its - cook, sits around for several hours and then refrigerated or eaten. During that period spores activate, multiply rapidly and produce a heat stable toxin which isn't destroyed when the food is reheated.

Consume that toxin and you will have 12-24 hours of violent sickness and the shits.

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certainly in the old days tin cans that were dented created an interesting effect - the dent would often crack the tin lining. This then exposes both the tin and the underlying steel to whatever is inside - so if that is at all liquid/acid it begins to electrolyse the contents with all sorts of bad things happening to the food...

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The problem with rice is that the spore forming pathogen bacillus Cereus is often present in rice.

No problem if you cook, chill rapidly and then reheat.

Problem occurs when its - cook, sits around for several hours and then refrigerated or eaten. During that period spores activate, multiply rapidly and produce a heat stable toxin which isn't destroyed when the food is reheated.

Consume that toxin and you will have 12-24 hours of violent sickness and the shits.

All the rice in Chinese/Indian takeaways/Restaurants is cooked that morning. So it's sat around all day till your 11.00pm apres pub, beer munchies.

Why are we not all poisoned?

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  • 238 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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