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Frank Hovis

Phone Scam Warning - Not The Usual Type At All

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If you wonder who falls for such scams then here's one that for which you could fall.

As you don't actually have to do anything.

New phone scam could cost you hundreds - even if you don't answer

A sinister new phone scam means that if you see a missed call from an 0845 or 0843 number, ignoring it may not be enough.

The scam, which has cost some mobile phone users hundreds of pounds involves getting a missed call from an 08 number, and without calling it back, finding you get a text message from your mobile provider warning you that your phone is being blocked due to high usage.

When you protest, the phone provider says you called the number back. Not only that, but your call lasted between 3 and 12 hours. And it's rung up a bill that will cost you a lot of money, the Daily Mirror and Daily Mail report today.

Victims who spoke to the Mail have told variations of the same story, all with no recollection of calling back the number on their bill. Especially not for 12 hours.

Some say they didn't even see the missed call, while others just ignored it.

One woman, who usually had a bill of £9 a month, was shocked to discover she owed £90 after a call which she did not answer.

Another was distressed to learn she owed £375 for a call to an 0845 number - 41 times higher than her normal bill.

Vodafone initially told her she had been on the line for 12 hours, but her phone only showed a missed call from the number and none the other way.

All the victims seen by the paper were Vodafone customers, but the mobile phone provider says it is an industry wide scam.

The numbers appear to be linked to 0845 and 0843 numbers owned by claims management firms. But the exact way that the scam works is still unclear. Mobile phones watchdog Ofcom is investigating.

A Vodaphone spokesman told the Daily Mirror: "As this is an industry-wide issue we are working with Ofcom and other operators to identify and close down this issue as soon as we can."

http://www.bristolpost.co.uk/New-phone-scam-cost-hundreds-don-t-answer/story-29185705-detail/story.html

Worth being aware of if you get a massive bill.

A few months ago I had a missed call from an 08xxx number, being the usual cautious HPCer I googled it and it turned out to be a scam that made money purely from people phoning it back to see who has tried to contact them.

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so they have found a method to get your phone to answer simply by calling?

Methinks Vodaphone doth protest too much.

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so they have found a method to get your phone to answer simply by calling?

It's not difficult. Smartphones are basically computers. If the phone user installs a malicious app, then the app can phone anyone it wants - you may well get a security warning telling you that your new fruit gladiator game wants access to your incoming call list, text messages and ability to make outgoing chargeable calls. But who reads those screens?

A scam where a malicious app masquerading as some cute game or other novelty gets triggered by an incoming missed call at the dead of night, and then starts an outgoing call, and then when finished, alters the phone's call logs to remove the outgoing call.

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It's not difficult. Smartphones are basically computers. If the phone user installs a malicious app, then the app can phone anyone it wants - you may well get a security warning telling you that your new fruit gladiator game wants access to your incoming call list, text messages and ability to make outgoing chargeable calls. But who reads those screens?

A scam where a malicious app masquerading as some cute game or other novelty gets triggered by an incoming missed call at the dead of night, and then starts an outgoing call, and then when finished, alters the phone's call logs to remove the outgoing call.

but that would mean the app answering the call, opening the line and allowing a reroute to the offending phone, unless, its just to a premium rate number.

Is it really that easy?data on the same call as a "voice" call?

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It's not difficult. Smartphones are basically computers. If the phone user installs a malicious app, then the app can phone anyone it wants - you may well get a security warning telling you that your new fruit gladiator game wants access to your incoming call list, text messages and ability to make outgoing chargeable calls. But who reads those screens?

A scam where a malicious app masquerading as some cute game or other novelty gets triggered by an incoming missed call at the dead of night, and then starts an outgoing call, and then when finished, alters the phone's call logs to remove the outgoing call.

Yes. Should only ever download apps from trusted sources i.e. playstore for android or apple store of iphone

You're quite right, the phone is a computer and susceptible to the dangers of downloading malicious software from dubious sources

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but that would mean the app answering the call, opening the line and allowing a reroute to the offending phone, unless, its just to a premium rate number.

Is it really that easy?data on the same call as a "voice" call?

The app doesn't need to answer a phone call. It can do if it wants, but there is no real need. You can get call filtering apps which intercept incoming calls, and will block numbers which you don't want to hear from.

Similarly, an app can quite easily access the phone's phone function, dial a voice number and hold the line open for as long as it likes - optionally playing sound down the line, but there's no real need to do that. The app doesn't need to send any data; it literally opens a voice call.

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The app doesn't need to answer a phone call. It can do if it wants, but there is no real need. You can get call filtering apps which intercept incoming calls, and will block numbers which you don't want to hear from.

Similarly, an app can quite easily access the phone's phone function, dial a voice number and hold the line open for as long as it likes - optionally playing sound down the line, but there's no real need to do that. The app doesn't need to send any data; it literally opens a voice call.

hmm....so this app is looking for a call from a likely specific range of numbers, a single one would leave the scammers a very short lifetime.... Why does the app wait for the phone call in the first place?

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I have PAYG. This issue will never cause me worries. Same as all those roaming abroad stories. Most I can lose is about £20.

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I have PAYG. This issue will never cause me worries. Same as all those roaming abroad stories. Most I can lose is about £20.

+1000

same here

What sheeple don't realise is that you get much better deals on payg than contract, but they think they are getting a shiny new phone for 'free' - they're not

Who's your provider ccc?

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+1000

same here

What sheeple don't realise is that you get much better deals on payg than contract, but they think they are getting a shiny new phone for 'free' - they're not

Who's your provider ccc?

can you carry your number over?

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I have PAYG. This issue will never cause me worries. Same as all those roaming abroad stories. Most I can lose is about £20.

Same here. GiffGaff for me, plus their phones are cheaper

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My big bugbear is the number of obscure numbers that have various prices at various times of the day from various devices..... Like picking up a loaf of bread from a shop shelf and being told at the checkout it costs a tenner, saying in that case no longer want it, but told you have to purchase it because you removed it from the shelf......as telecommunications are more a utility nowadays they need to be treated and regulated like a utility...... none of this tied in contract business with high get out clauses and obscure pricing.......things need to change.;)

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of course - just ask for a port code - they have to give it you by law (but I think they get @rsey if you are in contract)

excellent....phones havent been much use to me other than when I leave the village as the signal doesnt reach the phone..prolly a good thing

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I keep getting calls from PPI/claims companies who use my local area code but are based elsewhere (usually manchester).

Does anyone know how they do this?

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I keep getting calls from PPI/claims companies who use my local area code but are based elsewhere (usually manchester).

Does anyone know how they do this?

Fended off the PPI mob....but still get the accident you had crew....help!

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What sheeple don't realise is that you get much better deals on payg than contract, but they think they are getting a shiny new phone for 'free' - they're not

I remember once stopping to top up my PAYG and my mate looking at me with such disdain. 'Don't you have contract!'... Even at the end of the conversation he thought it was scummy to have PAYG, even though he was on £30 a month (with lots of minutes which he didn't use) and I was spending about £30 pa (and making the same number of actual phone phone calls, data, etc). Now, he did get a new phone every 3 years, so he remained happy (his 'free' phone wasn't worth £800, but that is clearly an unimportant detail).

I've also spoken with parents who have been buying their children - I'm amazed to find that they're all on contract! On their credit cards! Daughter #1 is on PAYG - I see it as a way of learning budgeting...

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+1000

same here

What sheeple don't realise is that you get much better deals on payg than contract, but they think they are getting a shiny new phone for 'free' - they're not

Who's your provider ccc?

O2 - not bad. Probably costs me £30 a month.

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+1000

same here

What sheeple don't realise is that you get much better deals on payg than contract, but they think they are getting a shiny new phone for 'free' - they're not

Who's your provider ccc?

Sheeple here!

£7.50 a month so £90 a year, new phone every two years, don't really know the price (and not that interested!) but say £60, meaning every year I spend net £60 on contract; which is fine and there's no hassle even if I could save £20 a year with PAYG.

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I'm thinking of not using a land line. I get it with the internet. Actually quite a few quid a year.

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I have PAYG. This issue will never cause me worries. Same as all those roaming abroad stories. Most I can lose is about £20.

Tesco not PAYG but a capped contract ,i just top up al la PAYG if i need more internet and the like, 0845 and premium rate are exclude from the contract

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