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swissy_fit

Building A House From Shipping Containers.

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Prompted by something I saw on Gizmag, I was wondering if it would be possible to build a house from shipping containers.

(assuming you own a plot which is of course the biggest issue but leaving that aside)

I don't see why not but I'm sure some way of making it illegal would be found or planning permission refused.

Hypothetically, place a number of shipping containers together, with perhaps a central gap to be covered by an insulated glass roof.

One or two storeys according to the amount of landspace available (I guess one storey is easier to build but if space is limited....)

Cut out various bits of walls/floors/roofs as appropriate to allow windows, skylights, entry/exit of plumbing and electrics etc.

Cover in a layer of insulation and some external cladding.

Am I missing something obvious?

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Prompted by something I saw on Gizmag, I was wondering if it would be possible to build a house from shipping containers.

(assuming you own a plot which is of course the biggest issue but leaving that aside)

I don't see why not but I'm sure some way of making it illegal would be found or planning permission refused.

Hypothetically, place a number of shipping containers together, with perhaps a central gap to be covered by an insulated glass roof.

One or two storeys according to the amount of landspace available (I guess one storey is easier to build but if space is limited....)

Cut out various bits of walls/floors/roofs as appropriate to allow windows, skylights, entry/exit of plumbing and electrics etc.

Cover in a layer of insulation and some external cladding.

Am I missing something obvious?

I recently posted this thread on hpc, with many links from my research on container homes

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=196930

It's probably been suggested before to the Mods, but can we have a self build part of the forum ??

With a pinned thread for containers and separate sections for buying or renting land

many posters seem interested

Edit:

Thread to Fubra / Mods for your suggestions about adding a 'Self build' sub forum section

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=196862&st=0&gopid=1102479092entry1102479092

2nd Edit due to merged thread

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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I second that emotion - it is a fascinating topic and one that I have often pondered about the pragmatics of.

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I looked into this a while back. Plenty of examples here

Insulation is the biggest technical problem, I think. Planning is another matter of course.

Insulation should not be a real issue ,XPS (extruded polystyrene) is the way to go ,you just have to stay away from anything that is capable of holding moisture, and have sufficient ventilation between the container skin and the insulation also weep holes to despers any condensation

Pinned section would be great if thereare any mods reading

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Insulation should not be a real issue ,XPS (extruded polystyrene) is the way to go ,you just have to stay away from anything that is capable of holding moisture, and have sufficient ventilation between the container skin and the insulation also weep holes to despers any condensation

Pinned section would be great if thereare any mods reading

As far as moisture/ventilation is concerned, I would plan on having double-flow ventilation with a heat-exchanger in any house I build, whatever the architecture.

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Are they strong enough to be used in more than one storey without other structural supports?

My brother has one, approx 16ft by 8ft at a guess, that he uses as a shed/store, and the walls of that seem quite strong.

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As far as moisture/ventilation is concerned, I would plan on having double-flow ventilation with a heat-exchanger in any house I build, whatever the architecture.

For the inside /living space yes but the issue that have been encountered concerning insulation/ventilation (i presume this is what Quicken was reffering to) are condensation between the skin of the container and the stud wall due to steel not being able to breath, and not so much the living space ,from what i can make out it becomes more of a problem if the outside of the container is no clad

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Prompted by something I saw on Gizmag, I was wondering if it would be possible to build a house from shipping containers.

(assuming you own a plot which is of course the biggest issue but leaving that aside)

I don't see why not but I'm sure some way of making it illegal would be found or planning permission refused.

Hypothetically, place a number of shipping containers together, with perhaps a central gap to be covered by an insulated glass roof.

One or two storeys according to the amount of landspace available (I guess one storey is easier to build but if space is limited....)

Cut out various bits of walls/floors/roofs as appropriate to allow windows, skylights, entry/exit of plumbing and electrics etc.

Cover in a layer of insulation and some external cladding.

Am I missing something obvious?

Was going to do this http://www.barnhaus.org/

Until some wally bid the piece of land to the moon....

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Are they strong enough to be used in more than one storey without other structural supports?

My brother has one, approx 16ft by 8ft at a guess, that he uses as a shed/store, and the walls of that seem quite strong.

Here you go anything is possible https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=Shipping+container+homes&hl=en-GB&rlz=1T4GGLL_en-GBGB384GB384&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=6mMYU46iK5SthQfMwoHoBw&ved=0CEkQsAQ&biw=1280&bih=653

Basicaly yes to a point but structual support would be easy and cheap if needed

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For the inside /living space yes but the issue that have been encountered concerning insulation/ventilation (i presume this is what Quicken was reffering to) are condensation between the skin of the container and the stud wall due to steel not being able to breath, and not so much the living space ,from what i can make out it becomes more of a problem if the outside of the container is no clad

Yes, this mostly.

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For the inside /living space yes but the issue that have been encountered concerning insulation/ventilation (i presume this is what Quicken was reffering to) are condensation between the skin of the container and the stud wall due to steel not being able to breath, and not so much the living space ,from what i can make out it becomes more of a problem if the outside of the container is no clad

I presume the origin of this issue would be the steel wall being cold, so if adequately insulated on the outside, not an issue?

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Was going to do this http://www.barnhaus.org/

Until some wally bid the piece of land to the moon....

Nice link, if under 3 metres tall, couldn't it count as temporary building (dismantleable) on rented land ?

Someone told me the other day that you could go 3 metres below ground & still count as temp building , anyone know if its true ?

not sure if this is 3 below + 3 m above on same building

I've seen smaller frames go £1600 on ebay

bigger one 5K

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/60-x-40-x-12-steel-frame-building-cattle-shed-dutch-barn-indoor-school-kit-/170972399744?pt=UK_BOI_FarmingEquipment_RL&hash=item27cebfc880

active or passive designs ?

http://residentialshippingcontainerprimer.com/Passive%20Solar%20Design

http://residentialshippingcontainerprimer.com/conceive%20it

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I presume the origin of this issue would be the steel wall being cold, so if adequately insulated on the outside, not an issue?

Insulated inside and out would reduce the issue but saying that a mate has an un clad/insulated (on the outside) container that he use as office/workshop that is insulated on the inside with 50mm of xps laminated to OSB then plasterboard been like that for about six years without any issues but who knows what's going on behind the stud wall as it would probably take decades to rust through to the outside

He was very carefull not to allow any of the ventilation/warm air from inside to be able to enter the cavity between the two skins though

Edited by long time lurking

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Nice link, if under 3 metres tall, couldn't it count as temporary building (dismantleable) on rented land ?

Someone told me the other day that you could go 3 metres below ground & still count as temp building , anyone know if its true ?

not sure if this is 3 below + 3 m above on same building

I've seen smaller frames go £1600 on ebay

bigger one 5K

http://www.ebay.co.u...=item27cebfc880

active or passive designs ?

http://residentialsh...0Solar%20Design

http://residentialsh...m/conceive%20it

Happy to be proved wrong but i always thought the temporary building could not have a toilet /bathroom or bedroom unless it was for business use where you had to live on site i.e smallholding

Also i thought it would not comply if the building needed a concrete slab for a floor /foundations?

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Insulated inside and out would reduce the issue but saying that a mate has an un clad/insulated (on the outside) container that he use as office/workshop that is insulated on the inside with 50mm of xps laminated to OSB then plasterboard been like that for about six years without any issues but who knows what's going on behind the stud wall as it would probably take decades to rust through to the outside

He was very carefull not to allow any of the ventilation/warm air from inside to be able to enter the cavity between the two skins though

The only issue I had with container living was slight black mould so you need plenty of ventilation. My conversion was done very cheaply, with the insulation being sprayed on and dry walling placed over the top. I'd be concerned what was going on behind the dry walling especially with cooking, clothes drying etc. To be fair my containers were not designed to be lived in but as work units.

Edited add. I believe a layer of Celotex as added after the spray foam.

Edited by aSecureTenant

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These threads are always the same.

They overlook that fact that the cost of the building is less than the cost of the land. This is due to government restricting wear, how and what we can build and live in.

I would be the firs to buy a mobile home and drop it in the middle of a few acres ____if I were allowed___.

Same problem with shipping containers. They do not provide any rental income for the % therefore they will not let you live in them.

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These threads are always the same.

They overlook that fact that the cost of the building is less than the cost of the land. This is due to government restricting wear, how and what we can build and live in.

I would be the firs to buy a mobile home and drop it in the middle of a few acres ____if I were allowed___.

Same problem with shipping containers. They do not provide any rental income for the % therefore they will not let you live in them.

Good point, but it doesn't mean self-build options shouldn't be discussed. :)

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For the inside /living space yes but the issue that have been encountered concerning insulation/ventilation (i presume this is what Quicken was reffering to) are condensation between the skin of the container and the stud wall due to steel not being able to breath, and not so much the living space ,from what i can make out it becomes more of a problem if the outside of the container is no clad

Trapped condensation will cause the container to rust sooner or later. This may seem a little in-depth, but if someone was going to invest a lot of money in building a home from a container, then they will want it to last as long as possible and not rust away after 5-10 years.

I used to work as a shot blaster, so I have a bit of knowledge on the surface preparation and painting side of things. The life of the container would be prolonged by blasting it down to bare metal and spaying on an Iron Oxide paint primer. Use a good quality iron oxide primer, maybe a few layers, and then some other coating to go over that. The best quality paint jobs are usually done in a factory, where the environment is stable (temp, humidity) and where the surface preparation (shot blasting) is done properly, and the primer paint it applied as soon as possible after blasting. Less reputable shot blasting/painting firms will do a poor job of the initial shot blasting, because once it's painted you won't know for a few years until the paint starts to peel. They can also leave the shot blasted surface unpainted in poor condition for a day or two, after an hour tiny bits of rust will form on the metal but they are too small to be seen, but they will just paint over it with poor quality paint. Even thinking about the quality of steel the container is made from should be a consideration for long

For insulation, the narrow boat forums probably have the best advice for price and long term knowledge of the benefits of different types of insulation. They seem to recommend Spray Foam insulation, and getting a reputable firm in to make sure it is done properly. They also use some type of tar/bitumen coating on the underside of the boat, this needs removing and reapplying every 5 years. I suppose it worth raising a container up to allow a flow of air to the underside to prevent condensation build up, another factor is where you place it. At the bottom of a slope or valley is where the air will be most humid.

http://www.canalworld.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=37610

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There was a thing on TV recently:

The Cawleys, one of the families in Centennial Park, is made up of a husband, three wives and 18 children, all crammed under one ever-expanding roof -- the family has outgrown their house and is renovating shipping containers in the backyard for additional bedrooms.

http://abcnews.go.com/US/modern-polygamy-arizona-mormon-fundamentalists-seek-shed-stereotypes/story?id=19322087

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What's the point without access to land that you are allowed to live on?

Guerrilla building. Find sacred NIMBY boomer dog pooping lands and overnight build a container city!

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Happy to be proved wrong but i always thought the temporary building could not have a toilet /bathroom or bedroom unless it was for business use where you had to live on site i.e smallholding

Also i thought it would not comply if the building needed a concrete slab for a floor /foundations?

Is this container living idea only possible to do cheaply if you try to get round the planning laws by crafty means? E.g. burying it on crude rollers so that you can claim it is 'temporary' and 'moveable' etc, having no plumbed facilities etc?

Is any structure for permanent residence caught up in the same planning restrictions, no matter what it is made from?

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