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justthisbloke

Anyone Ride A Pashley?

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I'm fed up with neck strain and back ache riding a drop bar bike for my commute. Am considering a sit up and beg Parabike. Under 10 miles each way so no need for Speed really.

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I have a vintage Raleigh roadster, probably 1950s, single speed, rod brakes. On the flat it goes like a dream. In the wet it is a little terrifying though, not much stopping power with the chrome rims! Needs almost zero maintenance.

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I love drop bars. Particularly when the geometry is forgiving of my paunch. Maybe your bike is just not a good fit for your physique?

Anyway, if your existing bike is half-decent and not totally unsuitable, maybe you could just try different bars on it?

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I'm fed up with neck strain and back ache riding a drop bar bike for my commute. Am considering a sit up and beg Parabike. Under 10 miles each way so no need for Speed really.

Nope but i know a few that swear by these for cost / durability/ quality http://www.on-one.co.uk/c/q/bikes/urban-bikes

There chrome moly frames wil llast forever

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My dad bought a Pashley in the 90s, I guess thinking it would be cool. It was stupidly heavy, the rod brakes were so useless you were better off sticking a foot out- and it wasn't even reliable, he kept breaking spokes. After 6 months he took it back to the shop he'd bought it from and traded it in (at a 50% loss) for a Raleigh Roadster, which was about 130 quid IIRC, and a much better bike- same 3-speed Sturmey Archer, but 700c alloy rims and caliper brakes. I used to enjoy riding it to the shops as a teenager.

He stopped riding it while I was at uni, and divorced my mum a couple of years later. I found it in the garage last year and put it up on freecycle. It turned out that the reason he'd stopped riding it was that the rear rim had a massive flat spot, presumably from hitting a pothole. I'd still recommend it over a Pashley though!

And edit to say- if you can't get on with drop bars, just fit a flat one; ~50 quid for the bar, shifters and brake levers.

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OP - as per other's advice. Consider fitting a shorter (if possible) stem with an rise angle (rather than flat) and either a set of riser or flat handle bars. That will put you in a more upright position on the your existing bike.

The most extreme version of this is what I did with a 90s mountain bike. These were originally closer to racing bike positions i.e. ass in the air higher than the handle bars, long stem with flat handlebars. Fun at the time - but not nice for middle aged backs. It was also perhaps a little too small - I used to ride 18 inch the 90s, but now ride 19/20 inch frames (and most had shorter top tubes in the 90s too). I simply replaced the stem/handlebars with BMX ones. The bike does look and ride like a giant BMX now - but at the riding position is much kinder.

I had a old rod-braked roadster for a while when I Iived in London. Frankly terrifying in the rain as virtually no ability to stop and you can imagine what the traffic was like at rush hour.

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Edit2, before you do anything, have you checked your current bike fits you properly? I used to get neck/back strain and it was because I was stretching too far on the drops.

Here is a good video about health for cycling with some tips for bike fitting. I changed my stem for a shorter one and got narrower handlebars and the difference was marked

If that doesn't work, maybe if you match up the diameters, you could put BMX bars on a road bike? Not heard of it being done but there are plenty of options that should allow you to keep the bike and change the bars. Mountain bike with BMX bars:

752020d1357780662-bmx-handle-bars-mounta

Edit, plus, how cool would that be?

Reckon you would need BMX stem, bars, and new brakes and (mtb?) shifters. Check it all fits! Also if your bike has a 1" steerer you might want to get a quill adapter to swap to a more modern 1 1/8" as you may find stems hard to come by with the correct handlebar diameter (these have general increased in modern times, dunno about BMX specifically but certainly for road bikes.)

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Aye - the Mary Poppins bike seems a bit extreme. Far easier ways to sort your problem out. As above.

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Mrs JTB thinks I'm just talking myself into buying a new bike. There may be some truth in that!

But I've decided I just don't get on with drop bars. I've had this bike for about a decade and done thousands of miles - but have never really clicked with it. I fitted the shortest stem possible years ago and have fiddled with every setting that you can imagine - but I'm still not loving it.

I've always used bikes as my day-to-day transport and a couple of bikes (variously nicked, or written off in crashes with cars :( ) have fitted like the proverbial glove; an extension of the body as much as a tool or a machine. Those bikes were flat barred and had bar-ends.

I don't even use the drop bars - I'm always on the tops. I could change the bars - but that's pretty major surgery. Hence me thinking of a new bike.

Or, rather, *two* new bikes. A potterer for commuting, shopping, and the beach - and a distance bike for when I want to do more than 25 miles in a day. Both will be flat-barred (maybe with some backsweep even) and more upright in riding position. I like to able to see the view - and, when traffic-jamming on the commute, look over cars).

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I never got around to buying one of these but they are one of the most comfortable bikes I have ever ridden. I have a Pashley built Moulton and that is a comfortable bike but, like all Pashleys it would seem, a little heavy.

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Well, I`ve been inspired by videos on youtube to build myself a bike. Who am I kidding, I`ve just dug an old bike out of the shed and I`ll put new shimano wheels and shlalbe tyres and tubes on it. (Btw it`s a 1985 Raleigh sports bike....made of old girders)

It`s cost me 97 quid so far and I`ll probably cost me 20 quid for a new `charge` seat and I`ll finish off with a German made steel basket.. (15 quid)(with milk bottle design)

Will look awful but I don`t care..

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If I ever find myself with time on my hands (ie "unemployed", retired, or unexpectedly wealthy), building bikes is going to be high on the to-do list.

I quite fancy turning an old steel 80s/90s MTB into a touring/commuting/utility bike. It would be fun to learn the skills needed to turn a rust bucket into a shiny road machine.

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Building bikes seems to be as much about storing a massive matrix detailing various compatibility issues between different shifters, drivetrains, bottom brackets etc. A massive pain in the ass, in my limited experience.

However, assembling bikes from pieces is easy once you have the correct pieces, and myriad proprietary tools/sockets to do the job. More modern bikes are generally better on this front. The biggest problems are sourcing reasonably priced parts for older bikes with indexed shifting.

For my money, take a 90s MTB and stick a very good modern groupset on it, like:

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/shimano-xt-m780-triple-transmission-groupset/rp-prod114930

You'll have a decent machine. You could spend a good fraction of this amount scrabbling for old bits and pieces.

You can lose yourself for days on end in this site, Mr Brown has passed on but the site remains.

http://sheldonbrown.com/

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Well, all I need is a gizmo to change (remove) a cassette and I`ll be away. This will cost about 4 quid (amazon)

Any information you need is a available on youtube?

An 18 speed Raleigh .....well what you see is what you get.

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A few years ago, I thought of converting my Raleigh Esquire 'sit up and beg' muscle maker bike to electric.

In the end I bought a Giant electric bike which, without the battery, weighed about the same as the Raleigh. The Giant is one of the best buys I have ever made, a real pleasure to ride. I still have the Raleigh though as it looks so good that I don't feel like parting with it, it still has the original whitewall tyres.

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Building bikes seems to be as much about storing a massive matrix detailing various compatibility issues between different shifters, drivetrains, bottom brackets etc. A massive pain in the ass, in my limited experience.

Yes, total nightmare. That's why the groupset was invented. :)

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A few years ago, I thought of converting my Raleigh Esquire 'sit up and beg' muscle maker bike to electric.

In the end I bought a Giant electric bike which, without the battery, weighed about the same as the Raleigh. The Giant is one of the best buys I have ever made, a real pleasure to ride. I still have the Raleigh though as it looks so good that I don't feel like parting with it, it still has the original whitewall tyres.

Assuming you are a mature gentlement (based on your username) can I ask you how you found the transition to electric? I'm not there yet, but I basically plan to jkeep riding bikes until I'm no longer able to climb onto one and I'm wondering what it's going to be like riding one with a bit of motor assistance.

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Ah yes, shimano has a sale on at the moment.

Btw, I`m unemployed (off sick actually), takes me ages to do the 7 miles to Aldi.......calling in a wethspoons and waitrose (for free coffee)

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Building / modyfying bikes is a piece of piss as long as (as already mentioned) you have the tools for the job. Or not even- when my brother got a great deal on a complete 105 groupset we installed the Hollowtech bottom bracket using a plumber's wrench and a bit of rag. Scratched it ever so slightly but it works fine. I still have an old chain whip that I made myself out of a bit of steel bar and a worn out old chain.

To work on a Shimano equipped bike you'll need, IIRC:

Allen Keys / spanners

Cassette tool and chain whip

BB tool and crank puller OR Hollowtech tool

Chain tool

I built my old Zaskar up from scratch aged 19 or 20- literally the only thing I didn't do myself was the wheels, because IMO life's too short to get good at wheel building if you're not going to do it for a living.

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Just need a chain whip, wrench and the correct cassette attatchenent to chabe your chsinset. It can be hard work though !!

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