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Six Towns With Most Vacant Shops Revealed

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/newsnight/9582631.stm

Six English towns have been identified as having the highest proportion of vacant shops in Great Britain, BBC Newsnight has learned.

Dewsbury, Dudley, Hartlepool, Margate, Stockport and West Bromwich were named as the worst performers by retail analysts the Local Data Company.

The towns have vacancy rates of between a quarter and third of all stores.

In conducting its research the company visited all towns in England, Scotland and Wales between January-June 2011.

The precise ranking of the towns will be published on Thursday however, Newsnight has learned that the new data will show that the national shop vacancy rate is 14.3%.

This percentage represents a slight fall from 14.5% in December 2010.

Decline because landlords are offering more out to charity shops or giving out more rent holidays to new business? Or could it be landlords are just declaring the shop derelict?

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http://news.bbc.co.u...ght/9582631.stm

Decline because landlords are offering more out to charity shops or giving out more rent holidays to new business? Or could it be landlords are just declaring the shop derelict?

Our local councils solution to help shops in the current difficult climate? Start charging for parking on a Sunday. Genius.

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I don't know why people go to the shops anymore. You have to pay to get there, choice is restricted and they are expensive because of their massive overheads. Use the computer instead. And from a resource efficiency perspective, shopping from home must be more efficient.

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Yes, local councils are playing a big part in the death of the high street, along with charging silly amounts of rates and landlords charging silly amounts of rent.

well, otherwise, they would have to default on their own commitments, to pensions, diversity and gypsies.

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Stockport town centre has been in decline since the Trafford Centre was built, plus theres manchester centre 15 mins away. They've propped up stockport shops long before the economy went sour, so hardly surprising.

Getting a Primark soon though :P

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What would town centres look like, how would they function, what would they do, if the shopping/drinking den model disappears?

Could this be a real opportunity for new business ventures? Or would any alternative use be crippled by high land prices?

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Well as you mention it, I choose to shop in stockport because it has 3 excellent ale pubs in the town centre. Seems most folk aren't interested though, but thats cool as it gives me less stress.

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drinking den model has died off in many cities.a lad I know who's in the pub trade says most places are sat night venues only.

That's interesting, not surprising, and quite positive! The city centre mega pub (sorry, bar) has been the most hideous development in the past 10yrs or so IMO.

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That's interesting, not surprising, and quite positive! The city centre mega pub (sorry, bar) has been the most hideous development in the past 10yrs or so IMO.

On the contrary, whilst loads of crap gassed-lager pubs have been going bust for 10 years, at the expense of more efficient big gassed-lager pubs, the quantity and quality of real ale pubs has been increasing for the last decade, even during recession. :)

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On the contrary, whilst loads of crap gassed-lager pubs have been going bust for 10 years, at the expense of more efficient big gassed-lager pubs, the quantity and quality of real ale pubs has been increasing for the last decade, even during recession. :)

One of the few positive things about the UK as far as I'm concerned is the ever-improving beer situation.

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One of the few positive things about the UK as far as I'm concerned is the ever-improving beer situation.

I don't give praise to Labour much, but they did create a generous tax system for micro-brewers.

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On the contrary, whilst loads of crap gassed-lager pubs have been going bust for 10 years, at the expense of more efficient big gassed-lager pubs, the quantity and quality of real ale pubs has been increasing for the last decade, even during recession. :)

Says more about the last time I went out for a pint! We are about to enter my favourite time of the year for beer, cold nights, warm fires, dark spicy porter.

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I don't know why people go to the shops anymore. You have to pay to get there, choice is restricted and they are expensive because of their massive overheads. Use the computer instead. And from a resource efficiency perspective, shopping from home must be more efficient.

Heaven forbid you should waddle or cycle to the shops like we did in the 60's. As kids pretty much all we ate was carried back from the shops by my mum or us. This whole "out of town" crappology is mass brain washing by the big stores to keep you spending on rubbish and tat. The result? Actually less choice and more expensive, poorer quality food.

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Quite. I've never paid to get to the shops. I either cycle or get on the train that doesn't ask for payment.

I buy a lot online, but things like xmas shopping require little purchases and paper etc. Got it all done on my fold-up bike last year B)

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'The High Street' is over rated. It's outlived its purpose.

The only thing I buy on the high st. is a haircut.

Local pubs - now that's a different proposition altogether.

What do people actually buy on their high street that isn't either more expensive or lower quality than they can get more conveniently out of town?

If you excluded charity shops, pound shops, hairdressers, over priced womenswear shops, over priced coffee shops, estate agents and banks what's left? What are they for?

Lump of bricks looking for an idea.................

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I don't know why people go to the shops anymore. You have to pay to get there, choice is restricted and they are expensive because of their massive overheads. Use the computer instead. And from a resource efficiency perspective, shopping from home must be more efficient.

Er because those over 70 would not have a clue about computers , those with poor sight , or unable to afford the internet would do what exactly ? would you make internet use mandatory ? Whatever happened to choice ,

There are people who actually enjoy meeting other people face to face and having conversation -old fashioned ,but a kind of traditional part of the human experience

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Er because those over 70 would not have a clue about computers , those with poor sight , or unable to afford the internet would do what exactly ? would you make internet use mandatory ? Whatever happened to choice ,

There are people who actually enjoy meeting other people face to face and having conversation -old fashioned ,but a kind of traditional part of the human experience

Fewer and fewer people demand this, so the market is changing, and town centres in decline. Fair enough in a free market.

My gripe is with the out of town shopping centres that encourage motorists and kill off the little guy ... but again, if thats what the market wants then I'll deal with it.

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Guest eight

Our local councils solution to help shops in the current difficult climate? Start charging for parking on a Sunday. Genius.

How much do you think that actually raised? Versus the cost of enforcing it, of course.

Say 2000 cars/Sunday (optimistic). = £2000/week = £100,000. Chickenfeed in the scheme of things. And although it's "only" £1 to park it must have a hell of a deterrent effect for the casual shopper or belligerent refusenik.

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Fewer and fewer people demand this, so the market is changing, and town centres in decline. Fair enough in a free market.

My gripe is with the out of town shopping centres that encourage motorists and kill off the little guy ... but again, if thats what the market wants then I'll deal with it.

the problem with town centres is its as boring as going to the supermarket.

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How much do you think that actually raised? Versus the cost of enforcing it, of course.

Say 2000 cars/Sunday (optimistic). = £2000/week = £100,000. Chickenfeed in the scheme of things. And although it's "only" £1 to park it must have a hell of a deterrent effect for the casual shopper or belligerent refusenik.

Surrey County Council tried to introduce parking charges in Claygate, which was vehemently opposed by residents. The small High Street's one of the few places left with independent shops, including a fishmonger, butcher, baker and greengrocer. In May SCC decided to override all objections and introduce them anyway but reversed the decision in July:

http://www.getsurrey.co.uk/news/s/2096432_claygate_and_hersham_escape_parking_charges

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'The High Street' is over rated. It's outlived its purpose.

The only thing I buy on the high st. is a haircut.

Local pubs - now that's a different proposition altogether.

What do people actually buy on their high street that isn't either more expensive or lower quality than they can get more conveniently out of town?

If you excluded charity shops, pound shops, hairdressers, over priced womenswear shops, over priced coffee shops, estate agents and banks what's left? What are they for?

Lump of bricks looking for an idea.................

This is what the high street is for. Banks, pubs, restaurants, coffee shops, hairdressers and purveyors of fresh produce :ph34r:

Edited by DoctorJ

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I quite like popping to the shops. It's a bit more lively than ordering things on Amazon. It's the vultures that are closing shops as much as the great grey sheds. Set up a small highstreet business in a secondary location and......here come the vultures:

"Ah - so you want to lease my shop premises do you? That'll be £50,000 per annum - oh and there'll be a rent rise at the end of this quarter - in line with inflation of course".

"But the place is falling down."

"Well it's up to you. I'm just awaiting on offers from various national chains who can pay more. If you get in quick I'll lower it to....um....£48,000. OK?"

"Ah - I see you've opened a business. We charge business rates of - let's see - £1,400 per calender month"

"What?? How much? ...And what do I get in return?"

"Erm.....well there is one street light 50 metres up there".

"Don't you even collect my rubbish?"

"Er....no....that's a separate charge".

"So you are charging me merely for existing. So what's the difference between you and the Mafia?"

"Nothing really"

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On the contrary, whilst loads of crap gassed-lager pubs have been going bust for 10 years, at the expense of more efficient big gassed-lager pubs, the quantity and quality of real ale pubs has been increasing for the last decade, even during recession. :)

+1, in my bit of Derbyshire anyway.

Two formerly dead/dying pubs, within walking distance of our house, have been bought and done up by a local brewery. They're always busy when we go in.

For when we are staying in, only yards from one of these pubs is an award-winning real ale shop boasting over 150 bottled ales. It's right near my kids school, so it's brought a whole new meaning to 'popping into the corner shop on the way home from school' :)

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