Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Hyperduck Quack Quack

Meaningless Political Concepts.

Recommended Posts

Tony Blair gave us 'Cool Britannia' and the 'Third Way', both of which had vague meanings at the time but in the end were just vacuous feel-good catchphrases.

Now it seems that 'Big Society' is just another such thing, all it really means is: "We're going to destroy the fabric of society but you're welcome to pick up the pieces if you want".

Possibly the worst meaningless political catch-phrase was 'caring, sharing nineties', which the left, and particularly feminists, trotted out at the end of the 1980's and beginning of the 1990's, in anticipation of the imminent downfall of post-Thatcher Toryism. The line was that people were fed up with greed and competitiveness and were looking to a more caring, sharing society. All that's happened since then is that caring, sharing people have become poorer, while greedy, competitive people have got richer!

What other totally meaningless political catch phrases or buzz words - left, right or centre, can people think of ?

Edited by Hyperduck Quack Quack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest sillybear2

Tony Blair gave us 'Cool Britannia' and the 'Third Way', both of which had vague meanings at the time but in the end were just vacuous feel-good catchphrases.

He also gave us "eye-catching initiatives" that "I should be personally associated with as much of this as possible". I guess an unwinnable war and the biggest credit bubble and crash in history were pretty groundbreaking.

It all becomes a bit vacuous at that level doesn't it? Brown spent decades plotting and stabbing people in the back to get the top job then didn't know what to do when he got there, apart from saving the world obviously. It's better to travel than to arrive, innit?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(1) We are all in this together

(2) Classless society

(3) Back to basics

( 4) Family values

( 5) Hard working familys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tony Blair gave us 'Cool Britannia' and the 'Third Way', both of which had vague meanings at the time but in the end were just vacuous feel-good catchphrases.

Now it seems that 'Big Society' is just another such thing, all it really means is: "We're going to destroy the fabric of society but you're welcome to pick up the pieces if you want".

Possibly the worst meaningless political catch-phrase was 'caring, sharing nineties', which the left, and particularly feminists, trotted out at the end of the 1980's and beginning of the 1990's, in anticipation of the imminent downfall of post-Thatcher Toryism. The line was that people were fed up with greed and competitiveness and were looking to a more caring, sharing society. All that's happened since then is that caring, sharing people have become poorer, while greedy, competitive people have got richer!

What other totally meaningless political catch phrases or buzz words - left, right or centre, can people think of ?

Harold Wilson had the 'White Heat of Technology', I believe..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wouldn't it be more efficient for us to try to think of meaningful political concepts?

In a similar vein, I've never understood why they count the passengers on a nearly full aeroplane when counting the few empty seats and then subtracting that from the total number of seats would be so much easier.

Edited by The Spaniard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest sillybear2

Ed Milliband's 'British Promise'.

So he's naming initiatives after rusty old oil tankers, I guess its a metaphor for the party :-

British%20Promise-01.jpg

Its sister ship was called "British Prudence". I think that sunk without a trace.

The original Promise was hit by a U-Boat on her maiden voyage:-

http://www.uboat.net/allies/merchants/ships/2457.html

Hrm. Which brings us back to the best catch phrase of all time, "I believe it is peace for our time." -- Neville Chamberlain, 1938.

Edited by sillybear2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've thought of another one, which I think originated in America during Ronald Reagan's presidency:

Trickle-down theory - whereby if you let the rich get richer, then that wealth trickles down through the social order benefiting everyone.

But we also have 'trickle-up' economics, where the rich get richer as the poor get poorer - as we're seeing now.

Another one I don't like is chancellors talking about being prudent. Gordon Brown did that a lot, but so did his Tory predecessors - I seem to remember Nigel Lawson in particular, who was anything but prudent, financially!

Edited by Hyperduck Quack Quack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've thought of another one, which I think originated in America during Ronald Reagan's presidency:

Trickle-down theory - whereby if you let the rich get richer, then that wealth trickles down through the social order benefiting everyone.

But we also have 'trickle-up' economics, where the rich get richer as the poor get poorer - as we're seeing now.

Another one I don't like is chancellors talking about being prudent. Gordon Brown did that a lot, but so did his Tory predecessors - I seem to remember Nigel Lawson in particular, who was anything but prudent, financially!

John Major took that phrase and changed it slightly he said

" cascading of wealth down the generations "

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest sillybear2

I've thought of another one, which I think originated in America during Ronald Reagan's presidency:

Trickle-down theory - whereby if you let the rich get richer, then that wealth trickles down through the social order benefiting everyone.

But we also have 'trickle-up' economics, where the rich get richer as the poor get poorer - as we're seeing now.

Yes, Reaganomics, but that turned out to be one giant golden shower.

The US has much better catch phrases.

"I am not a crook" :lol:

"Spieprzaj dziadu!" ("Piss off, old man!") Polish President Lech Kaczyński – said to a man on the street during the 2002 Warsaw mayoral campaign

Turns out insulting old people isn't even new.

Edited by sillybear2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Glittering generalities (also called glowing generalities) are emotionally appealing words so closely associated with highly-valued concepts and beliefs that they carry conviction without supporting information or reason. Such highly-valued concepts attract general approval and acclaim. Their appeal is to emotions such as love of country and home, and desire for peace, freedom, glory, and honor. They ask for approval without examination of the reason. They are typically used by politicians and propagandists...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glittering_generality

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest sillybear2

So the "Big Society" is just the positive and vague mirror image of "Broken Britain", the latter only being useful in opposition, in propaganda terms nobody wants to be seen to be in charge of a knackered country, it might have the unfortunate virtue of being true.

Didn't some guy once say something about "boom and bust"?

Edited by sillybear2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest sillybear2

Nearly all modern politicians are PPE graduates and careerists, politics is part of the managerial class, hence the associated ********.

http://www.julianwellings.com/buzzwords4u/

"Personally penetrate the customer vertically and horizontally to build strong, professional relationships ~ Job description from FMCG company"

Ouch.

Edited by sillybear2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed Milliband's 'British Promise'.

I do not know why but the phrase a 'British promise' feels immediately disappointing and has all the allure of a used condom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another meaningless phrase that is soooo 'eighties' is 'wealth creation'. People use this term to bash the public sector and praise the private sector. But let's unpick this. You work for a local authority - you get paid a salary. You work for a private comapny - you get paid a salary - exactly the same thing. Ah, but a private company makes a profit.... which is 'wealth creation'. But where does that profit usually go? To the directors and shareholders. As we've seen with the banks, wealth creation equals huge salaries and bonuses for the top employees, who may well be in America, Germany or Japan.

Edited by Hyperduck Quack Quack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'The Far Right'

Often woefully misapplied. generally by lefties who claim the working class as their power base

This one cuts both ways - with extremist lefties labelling anyone from Tory politicians to the police as 'fascists' and with extreme rightists (particularly in America) labelling anything left of centre as 'communist'.

But the 'far-right' can't be dismissed as fiction - the BNP is far-right, and radical Islam is far-right as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest sillybear2

"The controversial proposal..."

Any sensible policy deemed reasonable by nearly everyone in the country, aside from the chattering classes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.