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motch

Adding A Mezannine Level To My Flat.

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I have the ceiling height space to add a Mezannine level to my Flat. For the live of me I cannot think why the developers didn't add one to start with.

The room is approx twenty foot square with ceiling height curving from a little under ten feet up to fifteen feet. A mezannine level could be run the whole twenty feet length and perhaps six to ten feet wide and still have decent high ceilings for most of it.

I know I'd need written permission from the Freeholder to make it legit, and Building regs.

Does this seem a decent/sound idea, or am I just p-ing in the wind?

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I have the ceiling height space to add a Mezannine level to my Flat. For the live of me I cannot think why the developers didn't add one to start with.

The room is approx twenty foot square with ceiling height curving from a little under ten feet up to fifteen feet. A mezannine level could be run the whole twenty feet length and perhaps six to ten feet wide and still have decent high ceilings for most of it.

I know I'd need written permission from the Freeholder to make it legit, and Building regs.

Does this seem a decent/sound idea, or am I just p-ing in the wind?

Its a common enough idea,the issues being in any modern builds, the floor slab can take no load...Ive done a few in barns and other semi residences like nursing homes, but some places just cant take the theoretical loads.

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Its a common enough idea,the issues being in any modern builds, the floor slab can take no load...Ive done a few in barns and other semi residences like nursing homes, but some places just cant take the theoretical loads.

mmm, fallen at the first hurdle perhaps.:(

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1384188508[/url]' post='909428001']

I have the ceiling height space to add a Mezannine level to my Flat. For the live of me I cannot think why the developers didn't add one to start with.

The room is approx twenty foot square with ceiling height curving from a little under ten feet up to fifteen feet. A mezannine level could be run the whole twenty feet length and perhaps six to ten feet wide and still have decent high ceilings for most of it.

I know I'd need written permission from the Freeholder to make it legit, and Building regs.

Does this seem a decent/sound idea, or am I just p-ing in the wind?

Will be going through the same process in the next 12 months. Please keep us informed.

I would imagine the bureaucracy more daunting than the actual construction. Structural engineer is probably the first step.

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Can't you add another flat and flog it for £500k?

...or a few extra bedrooms....a rope ladder a curtain and crawling space height is all that is required. ;)

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Will be going through the same process in the next 12 months. Please keep us informed.

I would imagine the bureaucracy more daunting than the actual construction. Structural engineer is probably the first step.

First step is to find out how your floor is constructed...you will need a copy of the original plans...If not, a surveyor will be able to dig a trial hole to determine the strength and make up of the slab.

Next, go to a mezzanine floor firm to do a quote....they will do the drawings and calcs for you...you can then submit to Local Authority or the mezzanine firm will use an approved Building Inspector...this is usually faster and cheaper than the Local Building Control.

If you want a quote, PM me and I will put you in touch with a manufacturer, but get the specs of your floor slab.

Sometimes it is possible to mount on a wall...I imagine some illegal setups are done this way.

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Can you just not make do with a giant bean bag ?

all those three replies (with the two above yours) have been thought of, alas only the bean bag seems viable ;)

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First step is to find out how your floor is constructed...you will need a copy of the original plans...If not, a surveyor will be able to dig a trial hole to determine the strength and make up of the slab.

Next, go to a mezzanine floor firm to do a quote....they will do the drawings and calcs for you...you can then submit to Local Authority or the mezzanine firm will use an approved Building Inspector...this is usually faster and cheaper than the Local Building Control.

If you want a quote, PM me and I will put you in touch with a manufacturer, but get the specs of your floor slab.

Sometimes it is possible to mount on a wall...I imagine some illegal setups are done this way.

The flat is 3 levels up (the top floor) It already has/is a duplex flat - I think thats the phrase, where basically the floor is split level already, perhaps extending it along several feet may be an option.

I could probably get the original plans from the freeholder/service charge guy. He's the first step really I guess because they may well just say not a chance to a mezannine anyway.

i assumed they were all mounted/tied into the walls anyway, shows what I know :D

Is there a decent free CAD / house design program on the net thats easy to pick up and use?

Edited by motch

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The flat is 3 levels up (the top floor) It already has/is a duplex flat - I think thats the phrase, where basically the floor is split level already, perhaps extending it along several feet may be an option.

I could probably get the original plans from the freeholder/service charge guy. He's the first step really I guess because they may well just say not a chance to a mezannine anyway.

i assumed they were all mounted/tied into the walls anyway, shows what I know :D

Is there a decent free CAD / house design program on the net thats easy to pick up and use?

I would have thought that this idea is worth looking into in a bit more depth. If it is modern purpose built flat 3 levels up, then the building is likely to be relatively solid and could in all likelihood take the extra load imposed by another mezzanine level. I would find out whether you could get consent to do this (if needed) from the freeholder and speak to a structural engineer. It may be possible to find out who the engineer was for the flats when they were built, and they could give you an even more precise answer.

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You see a lot of these in old Georgian flats in Edinburgh. They mostly seem to be sat up on a stilt like construction.

Why would this add any more stress or load to the floor than say a big bed or sofa directly on the floor would anyway etc ?

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You see a lot of these in old Georgian flats in Edinburgh. They mostly seem to be sat up on a stilt like construction.

Why would this add any more stress or load to the floor than say a big bed or sofa directly on the floor would anyway etc ?

I'd guess in my case a floor of say 20 feet by 10 feet is going to weigh some, plus some herbit may place a big fish tank, a big bookcase filled up, heavy sideboard/draws, several people standing on it and so on, on it. a couple of ton or more quite possibly. Plus whatever would be on the floor below the mezannine already there in place.

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I'd guess in my case a floor of say 20 feet by 10 feet is going to weigh some, plus some herbit may place a big fish tank, a big bookcase filled up, heavy sideboard/draws, several people standing on it and so on, on it. a couple of ton or more quite possibly. Plus whatever would be on the floor below the mezannine already there in place.

Was wondering why i got no reply :lol:

The above makes sense - if you use both levels then you could have twice what's expected to be supported. There must be some major leeway included in these floorings though ? Even new builds ?!

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First step is to find out how your floor is constructed...you will need a copy of the original plans...If not, a surveyor will be able to dig a trial hole to determine the strength and make up of the slab.

Next, go to a mezzanine floor firm to do a quote....they will do the drawings and calcs for you...you can then submit to Local Authority or the mezzanine firm will use an approved Building Inspector...this is usually faster and cheaper than the Local Building Control.

If you want a quote, PM me and I will put you in touch with a manufacturer, but get the specs of your floor slab.

Sometimes it is possible to mount on a wall...I imagine some illegal setups are done this way.

Just had the tape measure out. My whole flat is 31' by 20' internally. with the ceiling height curving from 9'8" up to approx 17'

Inside these dimensions there's a upstairs duplex bedroom approx 20' by 11' this is supported by a big RSJ boxed in and running the whole width of the room, wall to wall, i don't think there's any floor support with this at all, apart from a spiral staircase which sits on the laminated floorboards as far as I can tell, and that runs off the RSJ.

Which leaves the main Kitchen/Dinner downstairs of approx 20' by 20' ceiling 9'8" up to approx 15'6".

My original thoughts was having a RSJ run from the lowest wall along to the duplex wall RSJ (like a T-bone effect)

However thinking about it, running another RSJ parallel with the original RSJ would probably be the only viable way, at about 6' to 10' away from the original RSJ.

If there's a RSJ running across already would that make it likely to be safe/ok to run another RSJ across say 6'-10' parallel? as a general guide. effectively making another room 20' by 6'-10' and filling in between the two RSJ's.

Edited by motch

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