Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

interestrateripoff

Princess Tower In Dubai, Lifts Break Down Sorry You've Got To Walk

Recommended Posts

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2343003/The-height-annoyance-Millionaire-homeowners-worlds-tallest-block-flats-forced-walk-97-floors-lift-breaks-down.html

Luxurious Princess Tower in Dubai stands at 1,355ft tall and has 107 floors

A large fire hose leak on the 96th floor damaged the eight lifts in the building

Residents told they'll have to climb up to 1,300ft of steps to reach their flats

Repair work is still ongoing while elevator parts are flown in from Finland

..

One resident, who lives on the 78th floor, said: 'I came home after a hard day of work and was told I'd have to walk to my apartment on the 78th floor.

'I truly couldn't believe it - there was no way I was walking all that distance so I just booked myself into a hotel.'

The 47-year-old, who left the UK two years ago to take a job in Dubai, added: 'They need to get this fixed pronto - I can't afford a hotel every night.'

He sounds a proper little princess. :lol::lol:

Nice to see they understood the risk of living so high up. If the lift breaks what do you think your options are going to be?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cue for a song, I think.

So I walk one, two flight, three flight, four

Five, six, seven flight, eight flight more

At the 12th I'm startin' to sag

15th floor I'm ready to drag

Get to the top, I'm too tired to rock

She called me up on the telephone

Said: "Come over, baby. I'm all alone."

I said: "Sorry, baby. You're mighty sweet,

but I'm in bed with achin' feet."

- Eddie Cochran, 20 Flight Rock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
He sounds a proper little princess. :lol::lol:

Nice to see they understood the risk of living so high up. If the lift breaks what do you think your options are going to be?

Doesn't sound unreasonable to me.

Why the hell were all the lifts located in one place anyway. Most modern buildings distribute the lifts for redundancy. In a building that tall I'd expect 4 separate lift areas each isolated on it's own power circuit, with UPS and generator backups. (Lifts don't actually use much electricity, as the motors lift on average half the weight of the maximum lift capacity... ie if the lift carries 10 persons, the motor lifts around 5 peoples weight.)

Walking 78 floors would probably take you about an hour, maybe longer, depending on how fit you are. And that's assuming you have nothing to carry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They should just abandon the whole city and level it with a small yield tactical nuke.

What a complete waste of money. Glass towers with no sewage system, located in a hellishly hot desert.

Fools and their money are easily parted, they say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesn't sound unreasonable to me.

Why the hell were all the lifts located in one place anyway. Most modern buildings distribute the lifts for redundancy. In a building that tall I'd expect 4 separate lift areas each isolated on it's own power circuit, with UPS and generator backups. (Lifts don't actually use much electricity, as the motors lift on average half the weight of the maximum lift capacity... ie if the lift carries 10 persons, the motor lifts around 5 peoples weight.)

Walking 78 floors would probably take you about an hour, maybe longer, depending on how fit you are. And that's assuming you have nothing to carry.

It's also assuming that you're reasonably fit. At 65 now, I find it's my legs that are starting to weaken. I sometimes walk up 200 steps in some underground stations for the exercise. But 78 flights - I couldn't do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Out of interest... What happens to the glass after a sandstorm or two............. Does it eventually become frosted and you no longer have a view....? Or would the top be above the worst of it .......?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.dailymail...reaks-down.html

He sounds a proper little princess. :lol::lol:

Nice to see they understood the risk of living so high up. If the lift breaks what do you think your options are going to be?

78 flights would be an epic battle for most people, it's not so much the distance/time it's the vertical gain, a lot of effort and a lot of sweating!

The first few flights would be ok then most people would be puffing like a cart horse, people taking breaks and getting in the way holding up traffic so to speak. Trying that whilst carrying bags would be a big no no, any sort of knee injury would magnify the damage. I'd like to race up the stairs in a skyscraper - but only the once. Hope there's aircon in the stairwell if walking up..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesn't sound unreasonable to me.

Why the hell were all the lifts located in one place anyway. Most modern buildings distribute the lifts for redundancy. In a building that tall I'd expect 4 separate lift areas each isolated on it's own power circuit, with UPS and generator backups. (Lifts don't actually use much electricity, as the motors lift on average half the weight of the maximum lift capacity... ie if the lift carries 10 persons, the motor lifts around 5 peoples weight.)

You'd think that careful design like that would have taken place, but you'd be amazed at how often things like that just are not considered. I know plenty of high-rise residential blocks, where all the lifts are clustered in one unit, with no form of backup power to the lifts, apart from batteries in the lift lights. If the power goes out, the lifts have to be lowered by manually operating the hydraulic release valves.

This is even the case in many UK hospitals which have a tower block construction. For example there is a 18 story tower block hospital in Sheffield. There is no backup power to its lifts, except for controls which will allow the lift to be moved to the nearest floor. As is typical in the UK, the generator is only rated for 25% of typical electricity consumption, as a result after lighting and medical equipment the generator is not powerful enough to operate the lifts, so there is no way of moving patients from the operating room (in the basement) to the intensive care unit (on the top floor), or moving medical equipment from ward to ward.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Running up that would be seriously good exercise.

Exactly! What are they whinging about??!!!??

it's whine whine whine whine whine with them!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is even the case in many UK hospitals which have a tower block construction. For example there is a 18 story tower block hospital in Sheffield. There is no backup power to its lifts, except for controls which will allow the lift to be moved to the nearest floor. As is typical in the UK, the generator is only rated for 25% of typical electricity consumption, as a result after lighting and medical equipment the generator is not powerful enough to operate the lifts, so there is no way of moving patients from the operating room (in the basement) to the intensive care unit (on the top floor), or moving medical equipment from ward to ward.

Is that the type of planning only management of the highest quality can come up with?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 239 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.