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pl1

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It's been years since I used a drill so I'm pretty much a drill virgin. Before I start drilling holes all over the place what are the gotchas again? I know the one about "never lending it out ever".

Check the other side of what you're drilling.

If you're trying to chase engineering brick or similar, 'pepper pot' it with holes first or you'll be there forever.

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Check the other side of what you're drilling.

If you're trying to chase engineering brick or similar, 'pepper pot' it with holes first or you'll be there forever.

With a proper old house, you could do as I once did, and melt a drill bit against rock that's harder than your steel!

Good idea to check carefully whether the hammer action is on or off. Though I expect you know that, since you know it's a hammer drill!

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Drilling is just like making love to a beautiful woman. You need to start slowly and get the tip in before upping the speed. Thrust firmly in and pull back out to clear debris from the shaft repeatedly, gradually getting deeper as you go. If you just ram it straight in you will get a squealing sound as friction and heat builds up and will either get your bit stuck or damage the hole.

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Drilling is just like making love to a beautiful woman. You need to start slowly and get the tip in before upping the speed. Thrust firmly in and pull back out to clear debris from the shaft repeatedly, gradually getting deeper as you go. If you just ram it straight in you will get a squealing sound as friction and heat builds up and will either get your bit stuck or damage the hole.

Best way to ensure the different holes line up level?

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What are you trying to knock holes in? How big are the holes?

My tip - decent drills. I was given a cheap set of SDS drills from B&Q, 3/4 of them were bent. When you took a 7mm drill, it actually made a hole about 9 mm in diameter. Bosch made good SDS drills.

The other part of "check what is behind the thing you are drilling" is "check what is inside the wall you are drilling". Hitting a water pipe will really ruin your day.

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Okay I've got my drill out (!) and not being an expert

It currently looks like this:

worx-14-4v-cordless-drill.jpg

And I can't work out how to get the jaws released to look like so

worx-14-4v-cordless-hammer-drill.jpg

The manual is rubbish, it tells me it's a keyless chuck whatever that is but I can't tell if there is a release mechanism or if I'm missing a part. Already taken the drill back once to be replaced as original was scuffed and had clearly been used.

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Okay I've got my drill out (!) and not being an expert

It currently looks like this:

worx-14-4v-cordless-drill.jpg

And I can't work out how to get the jaws released to look like so

worx-14-4v-cordless-hammer-drill.jpg

The manual is rubbish, it tells me it's a keyless chuck whatever that is but I can't tell if there is a release mechanism or if I'm missing a part. Already taken the drill back once to be replaced as original was scuffed and had clearly been used.

So the chuck is fully open. Put it in forward and slow if you have 2 speeds. Grasp the chuck with one hand and squeze the trigger. There may be some resistance if someone has opened it up hard but the drill will turn and the chuck will remain stationary in your hand until it tightens on something or reaches the end of travel.

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So the chuck is fully open. Put it in forward and slow if you have 2 speeds. Grasp the chuck with one hand and squeze the trigger. There may be some resistance if someone has opened it up hard but the drill will turn and the chuck will remain stationary in your hand until it tightens on something or reaches the end of travel.

I've just juiced up one of the batteries and tried that and everything else I can think of. The jaws are stuck in full open position, I only get a click-click when I rotate the chuck or when I hold it and do a "slow forward". I think it's bust. So I'll have to return it again unless anyone knows different?

edit: If I bring it back, can anyone suggest a good one?

That seems to have done the trick, thanks.

ntb: this is what I'm after parallel holes at opposite ends but through masonry. I also noticed tonight a whole cacophony of jargon for windows (reveals, drops etc.) So what's the correct term for that top bit? I guess I just measure from the edge of the window out?

32.jpg

edit2: It's also not lost on me that I'm typing about drills on a Saturday night.

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I've just juiced up one of the batteries and tried that and everything else I can think of. The jaws are stuck in full open position, I only get a click-click when I rotate the chuck or when I hold it and do a "slow forward". I think it's bust. So I'll have to return it again unless anyone knows different?

edit: If I bring it back, can anyone suggest a good one?

That seems to have done the trick, thanks.

ntb: this is what I'm after parallel holes at opposite ends but through masonry. I also noticed tonight a whole cacophony of jargon for windows (reveals, drops etc.) So what's the correct term for that top bit? I guess I just measure from the edge of the window out?

32.jpg

edit2: It's also not lost on me that I'm typing about drills on a Saturday night.

I'd call it a window reveal. Some are wood over masonry, some are plaster over masonry. If it's a newish house it could be plasterboard over a void and then masonry. This has a bearing on the fixings you use. I'm assuming you are going to fit a blind or something similar. If it happens to be wood, no drilling required except perhaps a pilot hole for screws but you've established its masonry with I guess a layer of plaster.

Carefully measuring and marking is basically what you need to do unless you can offer up the piece that you are fixing. If so, you can mark through the pre drilled fixing holes while holding it in position. You could also drill smaller pilot holes through, remove the piece and drill the holes proper. Either way, it's a good idea to offer up what you are fixing so you can make sure that it looks right in the place you have chosen.

As noted above, you have variable torque settings (the ring with numbers and symbols). These are for screw driving to stop you over driving various sizes of screws. For drilling, you want it on the drill bit symbol or the hammer symbol. It's a little easier to keep the drill in the right place if you start with the hammer switched off to get you started, then switch it on (with the drill stopped). Make sure you keep clearing the bit by backing the drill out as I noted before and make sure the bit is good and tight or the bit might grab in the hole and slip in the chuck. If this happens, switch to reverse to get it out.

If the surface you are drilling is hard and slippy (e.g.gloss paint over render) a bit of masking tape reduces the bit slipping about before it catches.

Beware fixings that come with blinds. They can be a little unsubstantial but if that's all you have then go for it. You can always drill for a bigger fixing when it falls down.

Sods law dictates that one of the holes you drill will go into a mortar gap instead of brick. In that case, if the rawlplug doesn't grip, hammer some suitable wood into the mess you have created and screw into that. Wooden wedges into mortar gaps was the way things used to be fixed when men were men.

I'm at an age where I no longer give a sh1t that I'm talking about drills on a Saturday night :P

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I'd call it a window reveal. Some are wood over masonry, some are plaster over masonry. If it's a newish house it could be plasterboard over a void and then masonry. This has a bearing on the fixings you use. I'm assuming you are going to fit a blind or something similar. If it happens to be wood, no drilling required except perhaps a pilot hole for screws but you've established its masonry with I guess a layer of plaster.

Carefully measuring and marking is basically what you need to do unless you can offer up the piece that you are fixing. If so, you can mark through the pre drilled fixing holes while holding it in position. You could also drill smaller pilot holes through, remove the piece and drill the holes proper. Either way, it's a good idea to offer up what you are fixing so you can make sure that it looks right in the place you have chosen.

As noted above, you have variable torque settings (the ring with numbers and symbols). These are for screw driving to stop you over driving various sizes of screws. For drilling, you want it on the drill bit symbol or the hammer symbol. It's a little easier to keep the drill in the right place if you start with the hammer switched off to get you started, then switch it on (with the drill stopped). Make sure you keep clearing the bit by backing the drill out as I noted before and make sure the bit is good and tight or the bit might grab in the hole and slip in the chuck. If this happens, switch to reverse to get it out.

If the surface you are drilling is hard and slippy (e.g.gloss paint over render) a bit of masking tape reduces the bit slipping about before it catches.

Beware fixings that come with blinds. They can be a little unsubstantial but if that's all you have then go for it. You can always drill for a bigger fixing when it falls down.

Sods law dictates that one of the holes you drill will go into a mortar gap instead of brick. In that case, if the rawlplug doesn't grip, hammer some suitable wood into the mess you have created and screw into that. Wooden wedges into mortar gaps was the way things used to be fixed when men were men.

I'm at an age where I no longer give a sh1t that I'm talking about drills on a Saturday night :P

Okay thanks for this. Yea it's for a blind and yea I noticed the latches that will hold it up look a tad flimsy but there's three and the blind is reasonably light. I didn't realise there was a subtle difference between screw driving and drilling. What's the difference between the drill symbol and the hammer symbol, just power?

Probably give this a go in the morning, though I'm itching to try it out now.

edit: Oh and what's the 1 & 2 drill gear for? Do you have it on 1 or 2 when selecting hammer? Reminds me of the old racers with 2 gear levers.

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Okay thanks for this. Yea it's for a blind and yea I noticed the latches that will hold it up look a tad flimsy but there's three and the blind is reasonably light. I didn't realise there was a subtle difference between screw driving and drilling. What's the difference between the drill symbol and the hammer symbol, just power?

Probably give this a go in the morning, though I'm itching to try it out now.

edit: Oh and what's the 1 & 2 drill gear for? Do you have it on 1 or 2 when selecting hammer? Reminds me of the old racers with 2 gear levers.

There's a big difference between screwdriving and drilling. For screws you want it on low speed (1) with an appropriate torque setting. Drilling is usually done at the higher speed and needs the clutch for the torque setting disabled which it is on the drill and hammer settings. The drill symbol is for wood, metal etc, the hammer setting is for masonry. Hammer does what it implies i.e. bashes your bit into whatever you are drilling. This increases the speed in masonry but is not at all suitable for wood, masonry or screwing and will ruin your work, blunt or shatter the bit.

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Okay I've got my drill out (!) and not being an expert

It currently looks like this:

worx-14-4v-cordless-drill.jpg

And I can't work out how to get the jaws released to look like so

worx-14-4v-cordless-hammer-drill.jpg

The manual is rubbish, it tells me it's a keyless chuck whatever that is but I can't tell if there is a release mechanism or if I'm missing a part. Already taken the drill back once to be replaced as original was scuffed and had clearly been used.

My advice is to get a proper drill.

Cordless rubbish. OK for drilling something with the consistancy of custard but it would die if you showed it a Victorian brick.

Get a corded power drill.

When you've done that get some f**king decent drill bits. DO NOT EVER, EVER, EVER buy cheap s**t drill bits. A good drill bit will go through brick as if it were butter. If it's hard work your drill bit is blunt. Either sharpen it (there's a tool for that) or chuck it and get a new bit.

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Drilling is just like making love to a beautiful woman. You need to start slowly and get the tip in before upping the speed. Thrust firmly in and pull back out to clear debris from the shaft repeatedly, gradually getting deeper as you go. If you just ram it straight in you will get a squealing sound as friction and heat builds up and will either get your bit stuck or damage the hole.

Swap you my next drilling job for ... oh, there isn't one?

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It's entirely true that a cordless drill is not the best choice for masonry and I would use mains power every time if available and SDS is much more effective than percussion. There are plenty of cordless drills that are entirely capable of doing the job well, they cost though.

The op has what he has and I'm pretty sure it will manage two small holes in this application without fuss. If you are only going to have one drill, a cordless is much more handy and versatile for simple household diy than an SDS mains drill.

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