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pl1

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a few random thts (mainly about masonry drilling )

- as people have said , when drilling , never keep drilling hard, withdraw it to pull

the swarf/dust whatever out , every so often ,

and ensure your drill bit does not get too hot ... smoking drill bit is not a good sign ,

altho slightly better than a smoking drill :)

- a corded sds drill is good for drilling masonry (as suggested by spord) .

I have a 14.4V battery drill (not hammer) (machine mart own brand) which I mainly

use for un/screwing screws (I like screws and hate nails) , and drilling into wood.

One problem is that could not buy a spare/alternate battery from MM.

- I have a (green) bosch sds drill which I use purely for masonry .

I bought this ~10 years ago, because I wanted to fit an extractor vent to a hob hood .

and somewhere (uk.d-i-y probably) , someone had said he had used one with the

chisel action to do that (I had been thinking about hiring a diamond hole cutter).

That worked well .

- a sprung loaded centre punch is an essential (?) tool for marking a hole.

a draughting template with a load of different sized holes in it is also useful

when marking for holes . decide where to put the centre of the hole,

centre pop that , then mark a circle round it maybe 2 mm (4mm?) larger

than the drill diameter , as it is easier to keep the drill in the right place and

prevent it wandering .

- I tend to start the drill in reverse when being particularly careful (masonry) , as it is easier

to control and keep it centered on the hole, and when it has sunk into the masonry ,

I then move to forwards.

- the other key aspect as someone else said was to ensure you drill in at right angles

to the surface ... if you have a helper then they can keep an eye on say up/down and

you can check L-R .... it is more difficult on your own .

- ensure that you are on a solid surface (chair,ladders whatever).

- blinds and curtain rails can be a real problem as the top of the window can

be a lintel (wood,concrete,steel) and like an earlier poster, had problems

that fried the drill bit with something in the lintel (this was with my old B&D

hammer drill ... I hope the sds would have dealt with it).

- for wall plugs , I always sink them with the head a few mm into the hole to

minimise the risk of the plug breaking the plaster out when tightened .

And on the occasional time I have a hole too big , then I use matches (minus head)

around the wall plug ....

enough ramblings for the moment .... hope it goes well.

rockhopper

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a few random thts (mainly about masonry drilling )

- blinds and curtain rails can be a real problem as the top of the window can

be a lintel (wood,concrete,steel) and like an earlier poster, had problems

that fried the drill bit with something in the lintel (this was with my old B&D

hammer drill ... I hope the sds would have dealt with it).

enough ramblings for the moment .... hope it goes well.

rockhopper

I don't suppose there's a real easy way to tell this until you drill into it? I suppose I could mount the blind outside the window but I thought it might look neater mounted inside.

And my final drill question, can anyone recommend a good wire and pipe detector or are they all pretty much the same?

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I don't suppose there's a real easy way to tell this until you drill into it? I suppose I could mount the blind outside the window but I thought it might look neater mounted inside.

And my final drill question, can anyone recommend a good wire and pipe detector or are they all pretty much the same?

The cheap ones are useless, they all require some practice to get the best results. These are allright http://www.zircon.com/products/center_ms_i520.html and I think Bosch do a decent one. If it's only for the blind I wouldn't bother. Only the clinically insane would put pipe or cable runs where you are planning to drill. Are there any sockets / radiators etc nearby?

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I don't suppose there's a real easy way to tell this until you drill into it? I suppose I could mount the blind outside the window but I thought it might look neater mounted inside.

And my final drill question, can anyone recommend a good wire and pipe detector or are they all pretty much the same?

I would normally run a 5mm masonly drill (smallest I have) into wherever I was hoping to screw, and be prepared to

patch it up when I get it wrong .

Thinking about the lintel problems, that normally happens when fitting curtain rails on the outside of the window (vs inside

the window recess) . The roller blind in our lounge is mounted 'inside' the window , and has has mounting brackets that

fasten (horizontally) to the inside bricks (iirc) . I *think* the mounting brackets for most (roller) blinds offer a choice of

vertical or horizontal mounting holes . Afaicr, I have always used the horizontal holes into the bricks at the top of the window .

The normal problem is getting the drill close enough to the top of the window , to get the drill bit horizontal ...

I personally like blinds recessed into windows , altho get the problems of all the useful stuff that accumulates on the window ledge .

So the ones I have fitted are like that ... I have another couple to fit in maybe 3 or 4 weeks , but these are el cheapo venetians.

One technique that might work for inside , is to fix a piece of wood (~15mm x 30mm - maybe) along the inside top edge of

the window either by screwing or 'no more nails' (or similar) , painting that and screwing into that ... just a tht.

I have a electrical detector which is el cheapo and works , and a stud detector that was highly recommended but

was not brilliant .... altho some of it was on artexed ceilings which is probably not a fair test :lol:

Sorry this is not very definite on stuff , hope someone else comes up with some suggestions for these.

rockhopper

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The cheap ones are useless, they all require some practice to get the best results. These are allright http://www.zircon.com/products/center_ms_i520.html and I think Bosch do a decent one. If it's only for the blind I wouldn't bother. Only the clinically insane would put pipe or cable runs where you are planning to drill. Are there any sockets / radiators etc nearby?

Always assume the clinically insane have built your house. It's safer.

In my house I've found electrical cables going diagonally behind plasterboarded walls and looped over doors to reach the socket on the other side! You would ordinarily expect cable runs to go straight up or down from the socket, or in other permitted zones, but when the clinically insane have been at it then you can find them going anywhere. Don't assume the experts do it right either. My house had previously been owned by and electrician. It was he who carried out the bodges I've found.

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Always assume the clinically insane have built your house. It's safer.

In my house I've found electrical cables going diagonally behind plasterboarded walls and looped over doors to reach the socket on the other side! You would ordinarily expect cable runs to go straight up or down from the socket, or in other permitted zones, but when the clinically insane have been at it then you can find them going anywhere. Don't assume the experts do it right either. My house had previously been owned by and electrician. It was he who carried out the bodges I've found.

Absolutely inexcusable.

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Always assume the clinically insane have built your house. It's safer.

That made me snigger but sadly it's true. I retract my advice not to bother - I know where every cable and pipe is in my house since I put them there but there's no telling what people will do.

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Drilling is just like making love to a beautiful woman. You need to start slowly and get the tip in before upping the speed. Thrust firmly in and pull back out to clear debris from the shaft repeatedly, gradually getting deeper as you go. If you just ram it straight in you will get a squealing sound as friction and heat builds up and will either get your bit stuck or damage the hole.

LOL, best post in ages! :lol::lol::lol:

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Drilling is just like making love to a beautiful woman. You need to start slowly and get the tip in before upping the speed. Thrust firmly in and pull back out to clear debris from the shaft repeatedly, gradually getting deeper as you go. If you just ram it straight in you will get a squealing sound as friction and heat builds up and will either get your bit stuck or damage the hole.

:lol: Can't top that, but.

A stud finder / cable detector is very useful, esecially for the novice, though some are bettre than others - have a go trcing cabling from sockets / switches to get a feel for it.

Drill a size smaler than you think necessary for rawlplugs first - just in case the drill bit wanders a lot in material you have not tested before.

If just using a cordless drill get the bosch bllue multicontsruction bits - I use them in preference to corded SDS most of the time unless doing loads of fixings.

Keep drill bit square as possible with wall at all times - unless intentionally skew drilling.

Matchsticks make great padding material if your plug is loose and the drill hole just a little too big - this trick works particulalry well when resetting door hinges.

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