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juvenal

Alvin Hall On Housing R4 Now

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sounds good so far

'is it future generations that will be left with the bill'

'where is the money coming from - the answer is, it is young people'

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financial advisor saying there are innovative products to help you borrow more money

this kid's boomer dad went quite heavily into BTL in 2006 LMAO!

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boomer dad bemoans the fact that nobody is there to buy his BTLs at their price he estimates at 125k ish, saying the younger generations simply cannot afford them; has not occurred to him they might not be worth that at all

Alvin Hall says that a reduction in social subsidy for tennants means things are worse for the youth if they get less subsidy; has not occurred to them that reduction in subsidy will in turn bring down yields and then prices of houses, also that the same youth only have to pay back that subsidy in taxes so are no better off as a result

there is still this sense that the market price is disconnected from affordability, Alvin should surely know better

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I googled this story and found a separate BBC article by alvin called Poorer than their Parents:

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-14294021

note the date: 29 July 2011 Last updated at 00:26

Twenty-five-year-old City worker George Lewkowicz is mad about the economy.

He is typical of many young Brits under the age of 30 who have come to realise that their financial prospects are substantially less bright than that of their parents' generation.

When I first met George last year, he predicted young people would take to the streets - and he was proved right as thousands of students from across the UK protested against the rise in university tuition fees and the scrapping of the Educational Maintenance Allowance (EMA).

Today, George predicts this disquiet is only set to escalate:

"There is this huge population of older people who have essentially had it all, and my generation are then paying for their retirement."

When this dawns on people, George argues, "the riots will happen".

Edited by Si1

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I googled this story and found a separate BBC article by alvin called Poorer than their Parents:

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-14294021

note the date: 29 July 2011 Last updated at 00:26

I can't wait to screw over a Buy 2 let landlord.

Buy his properties cheap and force him into bankruptcy, I just wish bankruptcy laws were tougher on them. Maybe force them into rental servitude so he can appreciate his sins.

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sounds good so far

'is it future generations that will be left with the bill'

'where is the money coming from - the answer is, it is young people'

Come on oldies and so called educated. Work it out that this means social unrest and therefore trouble (riots).

No, that would be making excuses fro them would't it. Better to call all young people yobs and blame them alone. After all years of older generations (including myself) being far more privileged, neglecting parenting responsibilities (not me) and racking up huge credit to fund an unsustainable lifestyle (not me again) ... well it's got nothing to do with the troubles has it.

You can see it in everyday life. The little things such as blocking my drive because I live near shops. So long as selfish people can make life easier for themselves, then s0d everyone else even if I am blocked in repeatedly (breaking the highway code in the process).

It's all linked. People want everything for themselves and they want it handed on a plate with no effort, and tough tittys if it means others are put out by selfishness. Housing equity included.

Under 30's have my sympathy with this housing fiasco.

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Come on oldies and so called educated. Work it out that this means social unrest and therefore trouble (riots).

No, that would be making excuses fro them would't it. Better to call all young people yobs and blame them alone. After all years of older generations (including myself) being far more privileged, neglecting parenting responsibilities (not me) and racking up huge credit to fund an unsustainable lifestyle (not me again) ... well it's got nothing to do with the troubles has it.

You can see it in everyday life. The little things such as blocking my drive because I live near shops. So long as selfish people can make life easier for themselves, then s0d everyone else even if I am blocked in repeatedly (breaking the highway code in the process).

It's all linked. People want everything for themselves and they want it handed on a plate with no effort, and tough tittys if it means others are put out by selfishness. Housing equity included.

Under 30's have my sympathy with this housing fiasco.

fair play

from the same BBC article I found:

James Morris, pollster and former speechwriter for Ed Miliband (of the baby boomers' benefits party), says ...

"If you ask people 'Is Britain going to be a better place to live in five years time?', the majority are saying no.

"If you ask older people... there's a consensus that this generation of teenagers, and particularly people in their 20s, are going to have a much harder time than their parents did."

However, Mr Morris makes an interesting qualification....

"If you look at my grandparents' generation, the kinds of hours they worked, the kind of work they did, the drudgery of [the] work... it's something young people today aren't minded to accept. (except of course working 50 hours per week in a factory 50 years ago allowed you to buy a decent house; big difference New Labour Trough Man)....

But what do the accused - the baby boomers - think?

James Morris says his research indicates that people in their 40s and 50s are the most pessimistic about the prospects for the younger generation ...

"Baby boomers don't feel like their wealth should be taken away from them and moved to the younger generation"

eh?

"They feel the government ought to act to create the right sort of opportunities wave the magic wand of Gordon brown like in Harry Potter for younger people to move on."

great solutions from the champagne socialists there - the answer is to make money grow on trees, hugz all round, isn't it terrible

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this was on breakfast this morning, interesting the change of tune by the beeb.

lot's of houses seem to be selling though, I think things will stay the way they are for a few years yet.

not that I'm going to be buying, too risky.

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fair play

from the same BBC article I found:

great solutions from the champagne socialists there - the answer is to make money grow on trees, hugz all round, isn't it terrible

terrible? more like lunacy.

But what the heh. They will be dead in a few years so what do they care so long as they get all that they worked for were gifted

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Come on oldies and so called educated. Work it out that this means social unrest and therefore trouble (riots).

No, that would be making excuses fro them would't it. Better to call all young people yobs and blame them alone. After all years of older generations (including myself) being far more privileged, neglecting parenting responsibilities (not me) and racking up huge credit to fund an unsustainable lifestyle (not me again) ... well it's got nothing to do with the troubles has it.

You can see it in everyday life. The little things such as blocking my drive because I live near shops. So long as selfish people can make life easier for themselves, then s0d everyone else even if I am blocked in repeatedly (breaking the highway code in the process).

It's all linked. People want everything for themselves and they want it handed on a plate with no effort, and tough tittys if it means others are put out by selfishness. Housing equity included.

Under 30's have my sympathy with this housing fiasco.

I agree with you but with respect I just want to seperate Old oldies ie late 70's up from boomers.

My mother is in her early eighties and of a generation that's always been asked to make sacrifices.

The great depression , WW2 and the years of austerity following it, all sacrifice for a better future.

After years of hard work and saving once again sacrifice. Her modest saving income and widows army/ police pension being eroded by low returns and high inflation, just so the feckless spivs don't pay for their stupidity and make a government unelectable?

They should riot but their deference and fatalism allows governments to f##k them over. IMHO

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I agree with you but with respect I just want to seperate Old oldies ie late 70's up from boomers.

My mother is in her early eighties and of a generation that's always been asked to make sacrifices.

definitely

needs repeating

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I agree with you but with respect I just want to seperate Old oldies ie late 70's up from boomers.

My mother is in her early eighties and of a generation that's always been asked to make sacrifices.

The great depression , WW2 and the years of austerity following it, all sacrifice for a better future.

After years of hard work and saving once again sacrifice. Her modest saving income and widows army/ police pension being eroded by low returns and high inflation, just so the feckless spivs don't pay for their stupidity and make a government unelectable?

They should riot but their deference and fatalism allows governments to f##k them over. IMHO

+1

Very good point.

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After years of hard work and saving once again sacrifice. Her modest saving income and widows army/ police pension being eroded by low returns and high inflation, just so the feckless spivs don't pay for their stupidity and make a government unelectable?

A query about police pensions.

I came across a guy last week, mid 50s, kids at uni: police pension of £2.7k per month, topped up with £1k per month from a window washing round. Still can't afford his £395k mortgage and has decided to STR.

My aunt is in her early 70s and has a police pension. Don't know how much it is, but she's been mortgage free since the late 70s because my uncle - retired from the police after a slip-n-fall (oops!) - refused to take on debt. He passed away a few years ago, and she's comfortably off (also has a private sector nurse's pension started in the late 60s).

Actually the first guy retired early with health problems too - endemic in the police?

Anyway, is there much variation in the sums paid out? Or how would you find out?

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A query about police pensions.

I came across a guy last week, mid 50s, kids at uni: police pension of £2.7k per month, topped up with £1k per month from a window washing round. Still can't afford his £395k mortgage and has decided to STR.

My aunt is in her early 70s and has a police pension. Don't know how much it is, but she's been mortgage free since the late 70s because my uncle - retired from the police after a slip-n-fall (oops!) - refused to take on debt. He passed away a few years ago, and she's comfortably off (also has a private sector nurse's pension started in the late 60s).

Actually the first guy retired early with health problems too - endemic in the police?

Anyway, is there much variation in the sums paid out? Or how would you find out?

I will pass on giving my opinions of the financial shinanigans of the modern Police.

Like any pension depends on rank, time served and when you served.

Pay and conditions improved dramatically under Mrs Thatcher, it is argued she needed the variance in wages to recruit the average grunt from the middle classes and create a divide between them and the Miners etc

Try NARPO or Police Welfare if your Aunt has any concerns.

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  • 337 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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