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ken_ichikawa

Police Powers Increased

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http://www.nominet.o...iatedwithcrime/

Precis UK police to be given powers to shut down ANY .uk website without a court order.

HPC looks like it is in danger, as we're all terrorists. B)

People of a similiar mind, even by meeting online can be regarded as Serious Criminals, according to The 1997 Police Act, because we dare participate in '...conduct by a number of persons in pursuit of a common purpose...'

The police and security services are allowed to bug and camera, and search our homes, without a warrant

Mandelson has been trying to censure the Web for Years

Secretary of State Peter Mandelson is planning to introduce changes to the Digital Economy Bill now under debate in Parliament. These changes will give the Secretary of State (Mandelson -- or his successor in the next government) the power to make "secondary legislation" (legislation that is passed without debate) to amend the provisions of Copyright, Designs and Patents Act (1988).

What that means is that an unelected official would have the power to do anything without Parliamentary oversight or debate, provided it was done in the name of protecting copyright.

The Secretary of State would get the power to create new remedies for online infringements (for example, he could create jail terms for file-sharing, or create a "three-strikes" plan that costs entire families their internet access if any member stands accused of infringement)

The Secretary of State would get the power to "impose such duties, powers or functions on any person as may be specified in connection with facilitating online infringement" (for example, ISPs could be forced to spy on their users, or to have copyright lawyers examine every piece of user-generated content before it goes live; also, copyright "militias" can be formed with the power to police copyright on the web) It's a declaration of war against the principles of free speech, privacy, freedom of assembly, the presumption of innocence, and competition.

This proposal creates unlimited power to appoint militias who are above the law, who can pry into every corner of your life, who can disconnect you from your family, job, education and government, who can fine you or put you in jail.

In the meantime, tell every Briton you know. If we can't stop this, it's beginning of the end for the net in Britain

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People of a similiar mind, even by meeting online can be regarded as Serious Criminals, according to The 1997 Police Act, because we dare participate in '...conduct by a number of persons in pursuit of a common purpose...'

Only if the pupose you are pursuing is actually illegal, like trying to blow something up or kill someone. You are not a "serious criminal" simply because you post shyte about lizzards or masons on some obscure web board somewhere.

The police and security services are allowed to bug and camera, and search our homes, without a warrant

You got a reference for this - I mean an Act of Parliament, not what some numpy conspiraloon says. There are times when your house can be seached but there are very narow grounds for it.

Mandelson has been trying to censure the Web for Years

Quite possibly but I hardly feel threatened by that odious little pr1ck.

Secondary legislation is not cart-blance for a single person to do as they please. Statutory instruments all have to have some Parliamentary approval. Besides, Parliament can always reverse anything it pleases so one person or party cannot entrench its self or any legislation it magages t pass.

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Police Seek Powers to Shut Down Websites

The police are seeking powers to shut down websites deemed to be engaged in “criminal” activity.

The Serious and Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) has tabled a plan for Nominet, which oversees .uk web addresses, to be given the domain closing power.

Nominet said the idea was only a proposal and invited people to join the debate on the form of the final policy.

IT lawyers said the proposal would be “worrying” if it led to websites going offline without judicial oversight.

“It’s not policy at this stage,” said Eleanor Bradley, director of operations at Nominet.

She said SOCA’s proposal emerged from changes made to Nominet’s policy development process earlier in 2010, as well as experiences with closing down a series of criminal sites in the last 12 months.

In the proposal, SOCA pointed out that Nominet currently has no obligation to close down criminal websites. SOCA wants this changed so domains can be cancelled if law enforcement agencies deem them to be engaged in criminal activities, and inform Nominet of their conclusion.

Ms Bradley SOCA’s proposal was the “very beginning of the process” to update Nominet’s policies.

“We now need to get a balanced group of stakeholders together to talk about the policy and its implications,” she said.

Since SOCA’s proposal was posted on the Nominet site, feedback had started to come in that was helping to define who should be invited to join a formal discussion of the plan, said Ms Bradley.

She invited those to whom the proposal was relevant to get in touch. “We want to make sure the stakeholder group is balanced,” she said.

No timetable has been drawn up for when the proposal would be discussed or when any resulting policy would be adopted.

“If you are going to do this, then fine, but it needs judicial oversight,” said barrister and IT lawyer David Harris, adding that that conferring these powers might be better done by updating the Computer Misuse Act.

Nick Lockett, a lawyer at DLL specialising in computer law, said he was “deeply concerned” about SOCA’s proposal if it meant it could act before a conviction had been secured.

“In a world of online retailing, the ability for a police officer to seize any business, whether that is blocking a domain or seizing the servers - pre-conviction or certainly pre-warrant - would be a dramatic change in the relationship between the police and the internet community,” he told BBC News.

He also said the police would have to be very careful about the sites they judged to be engaged in criminal activity. Mistakes that resulted in shutting down a legitimate site would leave them open to claims for “massive damages” he warned.

(Source: BBC)

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Can you not just base or mirror the servers in Iran or something?

Nominet, like all domain name registrars, create the database that the Internet uses to map domain names to actual servers. So the servers can be anywhere, but are dependent on having a valid entry in the registrar's database, which in this case is the UK and under UK jurisdiction.

However, I think I am right in saying that you don't need a domain name for a website; a domain name is actually an alias for an IP address, and you can use that instead.

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Only if the pupose you are pursuing is actually illegal, like trying to blow something up or kill someone. You are not a "serious criminal" simply because you post shyte about lizzards or masons on some obscure web board somewhere.

You are being hopeful. Did you see the sort of stuff that made it onto Australia's website black list?

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You are being hopeful. Did you see the sort of stuff that made it onto Australia's website black list?

Nope, never seen anything. Do you have a link?

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Nope, never seen anything. Do you have a link?

News articles:

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2009/03/wikileaks-expos/

http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/web-blacklists-innocent-victims/story-e6freon6-1225698047112

The Wikileak article, together with links to source documents:

http://mirror.wikileaks.info/wiki/It_certainly_looks_like_the_ACMA_blacklist,_eh_Senator_Conroy/index.html

Basically, as well as the usual stuff that one might want to censor (child pr0n etc.), political websites (e.g. The Australian Sex Party, which actually appears on ballot papers) and other random things ranging from a dog kennel's website to that of a tuckshop convenor, to Lol Cats to various pages on Wikipedia, to betfair.com were also placed on the Australian blacklist. Another organisation also got a random website added to the list by submitting a complaint (cannot find the link to this last story.)

As the list was "secret" there really wasn't any way to know whether you were on it (if outside of Australia).

And this was all in the early days well before any scheme had been implemented.

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Worrying for Welsh republicans.

Also, Saunders Lewis, a Welsh Hero can no longer be lauded on the internet because he was convicted (pre WW11) of a terrorist offence.

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  • 153 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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