Saturday, January 19, 2013

Well argued piece by a Cobden Institute speaker

'Collapse of UK debt-ridden social system only matter of time'

Collapse isn't imminent, argues that the current system is going to collapse within our lifetimes unless we roll back the state.

Posted by stillthinking @ 04:04 AM (2359 views)
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11 thoughts on “Well argued piece by a Cobden Institute speaker

  • Or alternatively instead of rolling back “the state”, we could fix the housing market. That would have start with Tories admitting they were wrong about something. Better to wreck everything to keep the dogma propped up. Housing affects everything. It’s one of the few things at the heart of an economy. We surrendered housing and housing poilcy to rentiers on one hand and idealists on the other. Affordable housing affects wages. Lower rents mean lower overheads for working people, that has an effect on wages. Which in turn has an effect on competitivemess. Secure housing has an effect on health, which in turn also has an effect on state spending on health, as well as having fewer people sick.

    Lower rents means a lower housing benefit bill.
    To name a couple of things.
    Lower rents property prices across the board, including business costs like rates. Rolling back the state in terms of housing was one of the stategic errors the conservatives were responsible for.
    As an idea it may have merits, but it has also created massive problems. Rolling back the state is a blind ideology. I’d be more impressed if a tory could actually admit the state is better some things than the market.

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  • The word affect should be added randomly to my previous post for effect.

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  • Phone. Bah. Tiny keyboard. Missing words. Incoherent. Ptah.

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  • mark wadsworth says:

    From here:

    When Richard Cobden, he of the Free Trade movement, spoke in 1842, only about 4% of revenue came from land. Cobden told Parliament: “Thus the land, which anciently paid the whole of taxation, paid now only a fraction or one twenty-fifth, notwithstanding the immense increase that had taken place in the value of the rentals. The people had fared better under the despotic monarchs than when the powers of the state had fallen into the hands of a landed oligarchy, who had first exempted themselves from taxation, and next claimed compensation for themselves by a Corn Law for their heavy and peculiar burdens.”

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  • FUBAR, you can only fix a market by getting the State away from it. You appear to want to keep your cake and eat eat.

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  • Libertas ,

    Forget state operated monopolies for a moment .

    Do you see any dangers with private monopolies developing if free market ideology is followed dogmatically ?

    If so what would you do about it ?

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  • The state is intimately involved in the property market since the award of planning permission is a state monopoly. Agricultural land might fetch £10,000 / acre without planning permission or £1,000,000 / acre with it. If planning permission was more freely available the cost of land with planning permission would presumably reduce. It would therefore seem that property is expensive because the state wants it to be expensive.

    The rewards from the award of planning permission are justly distributed through society instead it ends up in the pockets of a very few individuals. So I suggest that the government (local or central) should compulsorily purchase land that has been identified as suitable for development (at a fair market rate) award planning permission on the land and then auction it off in lots of varying size. The profit could be used to provide the infra structure and fund social housing to the benefit of the whole of society. It will never happen of course because the people who make the money out of the state monopoly of planning permission are powerful enough to prevent this.

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  • The state has already been rolled back these last 40 years. That is a major source of our problems.

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  • Libertass a ‘state’ will always be with us, a private group of corrupt people working for their own betterment, no matter whether they hide behind state institutions or not, will always usurp week institutions. Your ‘Randian’ utopia is a pipe dream that will never exist. By dismantling the state we have, and not having civic institutions in place, the commanding heights of our economy will only be captured by new barons of malicious intent which could be by bloody and despicable means. These new barons already pull all the strings of movements like the tea party in america and a number of organisations in the UK such as the ‘astro-turf’ taxpayers alliance or UKIP.

    You are as naive as any socialist utopian found espousing their ideology in any college junior common room.

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  • OMG… Have we just found an honest politician?

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  • The system will fall. Not IF, but WHEN it will…..and HOW that fall will happen.

    This is a wider debate than “just” housing….IMHO

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