Thursday, February 9, 2012

Data

English Housing Survey: Headline Report 2010-11

In 2010-11, 66% of households were owner occupiers. This appears to continue the gradual downward trend observed from 2007. The social rented sector accounted for 17.5% of households and the private rented sector accounted for 16.5% of households.

Posted by dill @ 09:55 AM (1273 views)
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6 thoughts on “Data

  • Dill you beat me by 5 minutes. I double posted the article.

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  • mark wadsworth says:

    “the gradual downward trend observed from 2007” This is a quite intended effect of Home-Owner-Ism, that owner-occupation levels aren’t allowed to rise any higher than in necessary to secure an electoral majority.

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  • More an unintended effect I’d say. Now that Right to Buy has petered out there isnt any easy way of countering the inevitable rising concentration of property wealth into fewer and fewer hands. Give it another decade and Home-Owner-Ists might start to feel a bit threatened as their electoral majority is reduced. But young people dont do themselves any favours by not voting.

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  • And who should the young people be voting for that will best represent their interests? In any demographic stand-off, the Boomers are going to win due to sheer numbers anyway.

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  • mark wadsworth says:

    GM, no, it’s entirely intended. All the Home-Owner-Ist Parties need are 51% of the electorate on their side, which we can round up to 65% actual owner-occupiers, because they are not all Home-Owner-Ists. That’s why the Thatcher level of owner-occupation of nearly 80% achieved by selling off council houses at a discount was a blip, because most of those houses are now being rented out, and o-o levels are going back towards the 65% level.

    Remember: o-o levels didn’t hit 50% until the early 1970s, so until then it had been politically good government policy to have lots of new build, mortgage rationing, Domestic Rates and so on, because they can get votes by helping people go from being tenant to being landlord. Once o-o levels hit 60% or so, late 1970s, the electoral maths flipped over and new construction plumetted, because there were more votes in preventing people get on the ladder than helping them to do so.

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  • mark wadsworth says:

    Oops typo, should have said “helping people go from being tenant to being owner-occupier”

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