Saturday, May 21, 2011

Spanish youth uprising goes largely unreported

Spanish kids defy rally ban

controlled media here haven't said much about this have they?at least they are doing something about it.what is really scary is that they have already had a crash but still cannot buy in to society as prices are still said to be 40% overpriced. Just how controlled is the youth here?...very imo as they are scared to put their heads above the parapit for fear of their lives being trawled through

Posted by taffee @ 11:39 AM (2545 views)
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17 thoughts on “Spanish youth uprising goes largely unreported

  • happy mondays says:

    Yes they are demonstrating because they want a Real democracy, not this debt ladened society that has been imposed on them & us..

    Revolucion 😉

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  • I do find it funny yet depressing that all governments seem to think that passing a Law will sort out problems….

    ‘spanish government: “People are angry?……Hmmmmm, I know! we will pass a law making it illegal to be angry, Sorted!” 😀

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  • I’m surprised this hasn’t kicked off before – a couple of years ago I anticipated a ‘hot summer’ of youth disquiet in Spain, but nothing really happened.

    Many Spaniards have ancestral links to North Africa – I wonder if the Arab spring is moving across the med?

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  • happy mondays says:

    Maybe it’s not an Arab spring, but a human movement ( no puns please) The illusion is no more 🙂 This is partly why our glubberment is desperately trying to hold it together along with propping up the house prices..

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  • “Spanish youth uprising goes largely unreported”

    Along with the obviously forged Obama’s long birth certificate (We gotcha). There is a great day a coming, but some will still shed tears.

    I promise you.

    Le Crunch.

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  • Spanish Banks, secured assets not booked to market price/value, hmmmmmm.

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  • Alan Lubin says:

    the youth here are controlled by the most prolific CCTV network in the world

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  • Youth unemployment is 47% !!!!

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  • The aspirations of spanish youth and others in europe have been destroyed by the banksters who shamefully continue to reap undeserved rewards. Our government is complicit in this rape of the poor here – as it is in the attrocious situation in Bahrain. Also ‘our’ ‘FREE’ media is not reporting issues that could reinforce similar feelings of empowerment among the UK population. Tune in to Al Jazeera, RT News, Press TV and euronews – to see what is getting left out of the UK’s sanitised news.

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  • It will be interesting (to say the least) to see how Spain’s debt crisis pans out. With such a large economy any catastrophic change in their circumstances could have global impact. Yet on the other side of the coin you can say there has been a catastrophic change and it is having such an impact — 20% youth unemployment is part of it.

    But unless you are a UKIP die-hard there was and is lots of sense in Spain being in the euro. It ties them into the wider European economy and removes a big unknown from business planning. What was known long before we got to here was the disparity between the northern economies and those of the Mediterranean countries. But the idea, at least in theory, was to have a large economic area to develop trade.

    Now to that mix comes double trouble from the UK. The innate desire to own a home outright (so there are no bills and you can live for free) and the attraction of the Spanish weather. OK, so it wasn’t just the UK, but if I was to read the DM I wouldn’t know otherwise. Cheap credit, because we are all making money so that’s OK then. And an asset bubble.

    Spain has nothing much else — although with all that sun and heat there is talk of developing the ‘green economy’ and selling solar PV to the rest of Europe. The southern states are all predominantly agrarian, and it was the adoption of the euro that was partly to help develop their economies.

    They have two choices: stay in the euro and tough it out, with help from the north; or leave and go it alone again. I think the latter is such a nightmare both for Spain and Europe that the first option will be pursued at all costs. If the bond markets don’t like it I can see Europe changing the rules to get them to contribute. That won’t suit The City, but hey it was these guys that mainly got us into this mess.

    On a different note I find it interesting that everyone says it was Labour that caused the crisis — when it is clearly international, and we are still not doing anything to restrict the international flow of capital which is a large part of the problem. The UK is an offshore tax haven — and admitted as much by Labour and Tory ministers: ‘we can’t tax them otherwise they’ll go away.’ Doh — tax them then!

    We may not be in the euro but we are really only a small country who will be affected by the tsunami of any European default. So we should be doing what we can to help them out — and of course behind the scenes we are.

    The effect of this crisis will be to bind Europe even more closely together.

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  • More pictures here. This is Madrid’s main square, the equivalent of Trafalgar Square in London. These people aren’t just marching for the day – they’ve turned up with tents, they’re staying for the duration.



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  • the number cruncher says:

    Spanish property wealth division is even higher than the UK and the same economic forces are at play creating a division in ability to create wealth and the laws of rent extracting real wealth from those that work to those that own land and monopolies.

    In both Spain and the UK public policy is squarely centered on protecting property wealth at the expense of those who are economically productive.

    I hope our youth has the balls to do the same, because their future has been royally screwed just like these Spanish youth

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  • dude,

    It’s all very well theorising why Spain should stay in the eurozone, but the arguments you present are those that were made to justify the creation of the eurozone in the first instance.

    The reality, as is plain to see, is that it doesn’t work. Spain is crippled because it’s currency is overvalued, and they are powerless to do anything about it.

    The theoretical benefits of a currency block are absolute peanuts compared to the hardships they are now having to endure.

    The eurozone was a reckless experiment, an immense vanity project – and it’s going very badly wrong.

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  • People with jobs don’t spend days at a time on mass protests. Unemployment is the key here, and in Spain it’s 21% overall and a whopping 45% youth unemployment. Until Britain hits similar levels, we won’t see protests. Our government is well aware of this. The BoE’s 0.5% base rate doesn’t just help the housing market, it also sustains jobs. I believe low-income renters with insecure jobs and short-term tenancies are the least likely to protest, since they are least able to take a few days off work to protest.

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  • the number cruncher says:

    You are right drewster and I should imagine the property interests in the world want us to move to a system where the majority of the population, are low wage earners who rent their properties, just like it was in the good old days. In fact many people who now consider themselves ‘middle class’ will be heading that way in the next decade or two as more and more loose their homes to the banks who then sell them on to BTL’ers and large property companies.

    I think this is what is happening in the USA

    Unless we do something about it…

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  • the number cruncher says:

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  • We all love to watch programs such as location, location where families up sticks and move abroad in search of a new life, but this is the extreme end of the scale. For many of us owning a property abroad is no longer a dream, but very much a reality which very often is cheaper than buying in the UK and often returns an income, due to the thriving holiday industry of today, where people search for holiday villas to rent, rather than booking into hotels in the packed holiday regions

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