Monday, April 11, 2011

Spring bounce at the Comedy Club

Want to sell your house? Give it a name

If you have trouble selling your house, you should consider giving it a name rather than a number, according to a survey. The name "Rose Cottage", "The Lodge" or "Woodlands" conjures up images of a rural idyll and property full of character, far more than if the same house merely had a street number, according to a survey of 4,000 consumers. As much as pretty climbing flower in the front garden, or a smartly-painted front door, home buyers can be influenced even before they have visited the property, the study suggested.

Posted by jack c @ 11:45 AM (2146 views)
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24 thoughts on “Spring bounce at the Comedy Club

  • mark wadsworth says:

    I find houses with names pretentious and off putting. What I really want is parquet, grey carpets and mag walls and a good old fashioned proper “address”. No stained glass windows and nonsense like that.

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  • sibley's b'stard child says:

    Sheesh, presumably these are the same people who would pass-up a pay raise in favour of a better sounding job title.

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  • i like name on a house

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  • mark – people are on average paying an extra 1% for a plaque on the wall ! seems absolute madness to me – what happened to simply valuing the bricks and mortar

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  • I rather like the name Sodem Hall.

    What does one do when landed with the numbers 13, 69, 101.

    It’s a bit like buying a car with CAC in the number plate or buying a private registration to make people think that your prestigious vehicle

    is a later model. It’s all a bit sad.

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  • jack c, spot on.

    flashman, fail.

    smugdog, I’m missing your sunshiney posts.

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  • This should cause mass confusion down at the post office over the next year or two as millions rush to add value to their homes. They could get Phil and Crusty to do a TV piece about it. I am not sure it will save the housing market though.

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  • general congreve says:

    @3 – Anchorman? 🙂

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  • sibley's b'stard child says:

    Absolutely Flash, if people want to pay a premium for a house with a name or a car with a personalised number plate, despite offering no discernable advantage, then that’s their prerogative. Equally it’s Jack’s prerogative to point out the idiocy of that.

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  • depends where you live and in what size of property some suit names some don’t

    lilac cottage, slum street, council estate, east where ever

    lilac cottage, fairy lane, cute countryside, england

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  • letthemfall says:

    I’m going to call mine Dunbloggin.

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  • Don’t know what the fuss is about. It’s all about marketing and subjectivism just like anything you purchase. They’d sell an awful lot less real ale if they called it: watery solution based on fermented crops made in factory.

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  • mark wadsworth says:

    @ Flash, yes, what is the answer to Alan_540’s question (and I bet that’s not his real name, unless he lives in a long street and called himself after his house?).

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  • mark wadsworth says:

    Flash, one of your main points is that the “world economy” is doing quite nicely, and viewed from Outer Space, I guess it is.

    But from here inside the Anglo-Saxon house-price-bubblosphere (plus Spain excl Australia) it certainly is not. It is quite possible for different semi-closed economic systems to do well and others badly (e.g. Communist versus capitalist countries, back in the day). And Cuba and Russia etc are still in a bit of a mess, China is based on slave Labour, India on outsourcing and the caste system, the Middle East on oil prices and Australia on commodities and so on.

    So basically, the sun is shining on Brazil and Germany and that’s about it.

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  • In fairness you’d have to be a complete t*t to pay more for a house merely because someone else chose to name it.

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  • happy mondays says:

    Some house names i might choose – Rippedoff – Exploited – Ponzi house – youcanneverloose – ididithowstupid !

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  • mark: “It is quite possible for different semi-closed economic systems to do well and others badly”

    I would like to stretch your meaning slightly further than you might have intended. People often use catch-all descriptions to describe the perilous state of banks, the economy or the people. For example that Greg Patel bloke lumps all banks together when he talks about the ‘multiplier’ (it always amuses me that he has built his theory on this multiplier, despite admitting that he does not know what it is to the nearest few zeros. The best we ever get is, some estimates say…). Some banks are very well capitalised and they can profitably expand even faster because other banks are poorly capitalised or have too high a ‘multiplier’. They are delighted by the plight of their competition and don’t give a fig for overall ‘multiplier’. Someone else might say that corporations are badly indebted. Someone else might say that consumers are badly indebted etc. This lumping together doesn’t work. Some corporations are awash with cash and they can carry on strutting their stuff no matter what the aggregate corporate deb. It’s the same with people. Some people were able to buy up some great antiques and paintings in the early 90’s. Antiques were being sold in glorified flea shops for a fraction of their previous value because of the recession. There are many successful closed loops within even the most moribund of subsets. For example, there are still companies and people who are doing very well in Iceland, Portugal and Ireland. There are British companies who are selling their goods like hotcakes abroad, despite the state of Oddbins. It is understandable that people look at the shite that surrounds them and become agitated by government reports of growing GDP. They have no way of seeing the vigour of the closed loops operating beyond their horizon. In a way it is healthy that so many entities are in debt or struggling because it allows a rebalancing in favour of the healthy. That is what we all hope for with house prices. Sometimes it helps to see things from outer space.

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  • mark wadsworth says:

    Flash, yes, most banks are doing handsomely (surprise, surprise) and some businesses “even in” UK, USA, Portugal etc are doing very nicely, some people in these countries have plenty of cash etc. I never said otherwise.

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  • 20. flashman

    flashman I sometimes wonder who the real conspiracists are on this site.

    Of course there is only you and some nutcase that often disagrees with you. Now that’s ego.

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  • mark: I know you didn’t. I just liked your turn of phrase and it got me thinking

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  • I just noticed Greg Pytel’s site the other day. Read even half way closely and it appears to be little more than rambling and unsubstantiated claims of calamities that must inevitably befall the world , or is it just the west, very very soon – without every telling us quite when.

    The thing is this sort of writing has a HUGE following on the internet – see eg Zero Hedge and a great deal of Market Oracle. Indeed even halfway intelligent sorts on here such as Uncle Tom and General Congreve seem to buy very wholeheartedly into the meme.

    I guess in the wake of the collapse of the banks this kind of thinking can be rather compelling, and even rather difficult to resist, especially if you an outsider/ in someway raging against the machine. The recent rise in the price of commodities has only added fuel and conviction to the speculative fever.

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  • @9 Mark, it’s a bloody long walk to the papershop, that’s all I’m saying.

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  • @19

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  • mark wadsworth says:

    Alan – unless the paper shop is at number 542?

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