Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Inflation latest

UK inflation rate falls to 4 per cent in March

The UK Consumer Prices Index annual rate of inflation has fallen to 4 per cent, down from 4.4 per cent in February. The Office for National Statistics said that food and drink costs had fallen in March, compared with February. Retail Prices Index inflation also fell to 5.3 per cent from 5.5 per cent in February.In February, Bank of England governor Mervyn King said inflation was likely to remain well above target for this year, before falling back in 2012, based on bank rate increases “in line with market expectations”.He said: “Although one cannot be sure, prices excluding the effects of these factors would probably have increased at a rate well below the 2 per cent inflation target. “Inflation is likely to continue to pick up to somewhere between 4 per cent and 5 per cent over.

Posted by jack c @ 10:14 AM (3187 views)
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58 thoughts on “Inflation latest

  • back to fudging figures again, hey Mervyn come shopping with us I dare you

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  • All very well, but my car insurance had to be paid this month – and that was a 40% increase on last year, for one of my larger outgoings.

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  • I see a lot of cost-cutting and discounting at the moment. If you look at retail figures, they’re not great.

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  • growler yes i have seen that too, but when it comes to food the cost cutting comes at the expense of smaller pack sizes

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  • We tend to only register the things that go up in price. Some prices have recently fallen. It will be interesting to see what happens to energy prices etc, when Libya and Japan calm down a bit

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  • flashman maybe but what or where is after Libya?

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  • I read somewhere that if you take all the tax increases out inflation is fairly stable.

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  • mark: The trouble in Libya is putting upward pressure on oil prices. The nuclear plant problems in Japan are also putting upward pressure on energy prices. Once these two problems have calmed down a bit, it’s possible (not certain) that we will see lower energy prices, which would, in turn, impact the inflation numbers

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  • @ Flashman,
    Do I detect a normalcy bias over Libya and Japan? To me, the whole middle east seems to be in ferment as the people get access to social networking and realise they are being screwed by their “beloved leaders” of long standing.

    Its true that we often bring to mind the things which affect us personally and have annoyed us by going up in price. We often ignore minor drops in price. Human nature?

    Either way, I recall that the target was supposed to be 2%, and not double.

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  • general congreve says:

    0.2% sounds like margin of error to me.

    The way this is being reported you would think prices are falling in the shops. All we have, if true, is an ever so slight decrease in the rate at which prices are increasing. Love the way the drop in the rate is being reported as ‘unexpected’ though, nice double bluff BoE.

    @5 – A fair point. But I doubt we’ll see UK energy providers putting prices down in such an aftermath, it’ll just slow the pace at which they put them up, so the pressure on UK consumers isn’t likely to ease at all. Besides, Japan has just raised the emergency level at Fukushima has been upgraded to Level 7 (same as Chernobyl), things are getting worse not better. Any sight of an end to the civil war in Libya at your end Flash?

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  • alan: My understanding of a normalcy bias is that it is a tendency of people to underestimate the severity or possibility of an imminent negative event. Are you saying that the world underestimates the possibility of a coming ‘storm’ in the Middle East? Quite possibly but it is not my area of expertise so I wouldn’t really like to comment. Apparently people are naturally wired towards the normalcy bias end of the emotional spectrum. The social scientists that came to that conclusion obviously haven’t read this site. If they had, they might have come to the conclusion that people are wired to permanently believe that we are only ever seconds from a total catastrophe.

    The target is indeed 2% but our current inflation is so mild by historical standards that I don’t see a reason to make too much of a fuss (I posted an instyructive graph the other day, that showed 210 years of inflation/deflation).

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  • the number cruncher says:

    I have a little knowledge of agriculture and my opinion is food prices will fall this harvest (northern hemisphere). The supply side has increased. The real demand side is static, but who knows what the false demand side in the guise of speculative capital has in store.

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  • GC: I am unable to discuss the Japan or Libya situation with you because I don’t have your level of knowledge and insight. Have you considered advising NATO or the UN? They don’t appear to have any analysts who can predict the future with your level of certainty

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  • Morning Flashman

    Very amusing, I think The General has a point though, if Fuchashima blows over, where will it blow to ? I haven’t taken an avid interest in the subject as I’ve been pretty busy of late, but I haven’t yet read an article on how big the problem could turn into. IE is this plant actually much bigger than Chernobyl, and could it take a much bigger turn for the worse if nature starts working even further against it ?

    BTW are you still running with the HPC over opinion now ?

    I’m definately sensing a slowing down in my area which seems to have been very resilient of late to the HPC.

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  • general congreve says:

    @11 – Love the first comment Flash, they obviously didn’t interview a broad cross-section of HPCers when formulating their theory. As for my understanding of normalcy bias, it is people being wired to think tomorrow will be much like today, because typically that is peoples experience, until a great big tsunami suddenly comes and washes you away and poisons your country with nuclear fallout.

    It is also applied to the way people, by default, tend to assume strangers, share the same values, beliefs, experiences and knowledge that they do. As per this example from when nuclear weapons came up in conversation with an otherwise well-educated ex:

    Ex – “What are nuclear weapons?”
    GC – “WTF? Seriously? OK, prepare to be scared sh1tless!”

    As for inflation, agreed, it is pretty low by historical standards. However, the severity of the effects of inflation at this level cannot be taken in isolation at just a nominal % figure. What also needs to be factored in is the interest rate differential as we also have 300-year record lows in interest rates. Also we need to take into consideration the levels of public and private debt at this time and how even a small increase in the rate of inflation, or interest rates to counter this inflation, will impact on the consumer and the economy.

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  • GC you are in danger of turning into something of a parody/side show, demonstrating an always limited/selective grasp of present facts, and yet when it comes to the future an unabashed self alleged uncanny prescience.

    A while ago you indicated you posted because you wanted to help people preserve their wealth. Do you really think that obsessive ill thought out posts are the way to go about that? A leading question I appreciate, but you are reminding me of the religious types who used to go door to door selling salvation. They were determined and grimly so, but in all their tedium they also came across as the worst possible adverts for the salvation they were selling.

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  • I usually avoid commenting directly on currency movements. The drop in CPI inflation is an excuse. The market was about to make the move anyway and these bits of news provide convenient cover. Individuals who trade on news often end up exasperated because the market is usually not really responding to the news and the news is not actually news to the main players. This ‘surprise’ moderation in the rate of inflation was expected some time ago

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  • general congreve says:

    @13 – *Blushes* Oh come on Flash, I’m flattered, but I think it is you who should be advising NATO. After all Flash you sounded very confident in your first post @5 – “WHEN Japan and Libya calm down a bit.”

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  • general congreve says:

    @17 Sorry Bellwether, but what are you replying to there? If you disagree with a point I’ve made, then let me know. None of my statements above are ill-thought out. Essentially they are the other side of the coin to Flashman’s comments, that is the nature of debate, two sides of an argument.

    If you are going to refer to my perceived shortcomings I would appreciate it if you referenced the point I made, tell you think I am wrong and explain why you think so. Instead it seems (and 17 is a glaring example) that you sole mission on here is to poke accusations and sully the names of other posters (not least myself) for your own amusement. Your posts are heavy on personal attack and low on critical analysis. They call it trolling I believe.

    Good day to you Sir!

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  • libya will spread the west want it to spread so the west can get control of oil before china does, china is investing heavily in parts of africa why? the next place for cheap labour and decent minerals etc

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  • 17 was posted not so much as a reaction to 17 but to 10 and to comments you generally post regarding the bankruptcy of the west/the world, the impending inflationary tsunami.

    It is I guess no great surprise that along with Zero Hedge (where as I previously suggested you would find yourself falling on far more eager ears) Fukushima is a huge focus, their only other current focus being the run up in silver prices and what that MUST mean. I am confident that you know next to nothing about Fukushima and I’d have more respect for your position if you actually took some time out posting to form an accurate view, rather than merely latching onto whatever fact supports your deteminedly “contrarian” view that it is for ordinary people to assume that tomorrow will be like today, but that you are special and know differently. This reaks of conciet.

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  • orcusmaximus says:

    @flashman “our current inflation is so mild by historical standards”

    Would that be CPI or *real* inflation (I refer you to fancypants’ car insurance).

    A more accurate statement might be

    “Government statistical fudging is quite high by historical standards”

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  • Correction as a reaction to 16, but the point is clear in any event. GC these are not attacks on you but on your nonsense posts. You’re incessant mystic meg type peering into the future damages what might otherwise be an interesting if better thought out/researched perspective. If your posting pattern is anything to go by you clearly have plenty of time on your hands, how about using some of it on actual reasearch/reflection. I’d wager you would as a result less launch yourself into grandiose topics.

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  • Good morning str: I’m not sure what you are asking me on the nuclear issue, so forgive me if the answer does not quite fit the question. I know more about marmalade than nuclear power plants but I have skimmed through several subscription briefings on the subject. I struggled to understand some of them but basically none of the experts who are paid to decipher these things for mere mortals like us, seem to give a flying fudge about it. It reminds me of the BP spill situation.

    My opinion on the HPC has never changed. I think there is a high probability that we will only get a severe HPC if unemployment gets nearer to the levels seen is previous recessions. In the meantime conditions seem likely to cause a gentle drift downwards in prices. Unemployment forecasts are not my forte so I am reliant on others for those. I do not put too much store in unemployment forecasts because unemployment prediction is a hard nut to crack. However, the general consensus is that we will no longer reach the numbers once predicted. The economy is predicted to grow weakly this year and at a slightly stronger but accelerating rate next year. This predicted scenario is not conducive to a fast growing rate of unemployment. On the other hand, unemployment growth always lags a recovery so the unemployment number is likely to tick up for some time. It’ll be a close run thing, so a balls out HPC could still happen

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  • orcusmaximus: Never underestimate the fudging of times gone by. The Wilson government and the Thatcher government told us some pretty tall stories. I see no evidence of an increase in the rate of fudge packing

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  • orcusmaximus says:

    @flashman – touché!

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  • mark wadsworth says:

    Why worry about the Middle East?

    They have been permanently at war with themselves for fifty years, there are more stable times and less stable times and right now we are approx. in ‘normal times’, it can get far less stable than this.

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  • general congreve says:

    @22 and @24 – More vacuous waffle. All I insinuated about Fukushima (in fact I think this article is the first time I have mentioned it) is that the outcome cannot be known. I do not need to be a nuclear physicist to know the situation is not great at the moment (see today’s news about the severity level being raised) and it is certain to say the ramifications for the future are uncertain – How will the additional debt and fall in Japanese GDP (as a result of this disaster) affect their economy and financial markets in the future? How badly will it affect agriculture in the locality and therefore rice prices? How bad will the long term health affects be? How will this this ultimately affect the world’s appetite for nuclear energy and therefore uranium?

    While I sincerely hope the situation will be brought under control, the long term consequences of the damage wrought so far, and what long term outcome that will have on the world, is unknown. So stating, ‘when it all calms down things will return to normal’, which is what I was originally responding to, is a very simplistic and hopelessly optimistic view point IMO.

    I am now done explaining myself to you, it is not worth my time or effort, you seem intent on finding fault where there is none. Like I said, trolling.

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  • GC I’m criticising your tendency to make predictions and statements about things you can’t possibly know. I genuinely hope that viewed in retrospect and with reference to posts you might make henceforth, my comments at 22 and 24 are proven to be vacuous waffle!

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  • GC @19: I think you are overreaching a little. My “when Japan and Libya calm down a bit” could reasonably be considered to be one of the very few valid expressions of certainty. Everything ebbs and flows and the situation will most certainly calm down a bit at some stage. Perhaps one of the main differences between us is that I see ebb and flow where you see only escalating flow. The one situation that could void the legitimacy of the rather innocuous statement you shoehorned and pounded into making a point, is the mad bloggers ‘end of days’ eventuality. Even then, the total peace that presumably greets the end of the world, would surely qualify as a ‘calming down’.

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  • GC @19: I think you are overreaching a little. My “when Japan and Libya calm down a bit” could reasonably be considered to be one of the very few valid expressions of certainty. Everything ebbs and flows and the situation will most certainly calm down a bit at some stage. Perhaps one of the main differences between us is that I see ebb and flow where you see only escalating flow. The one situation that could void the legitimacy of the rather innocuous statement you shoehorned and pounded into making a point, is the mad bloggers ‘end of days’ eventuality. Even then, the total peace that presumably greets the end of the world, would surely qualify as a ‘calming down’.

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  • general congreve says:

    @30 – I only have my self to blame, I can’t ignore the bait. I have just reread my two posts @10 and @16 to be double sure and for complete clarity I have in no way made any predictions or statements I couldn’t possibly know:

    – rate on inflation decreasing (in the news)
    – energy companies will probably not lower energy prices to consumers if energy costs drop (opinion based on experience)
    – BoE Reporting inflation drop ad unexpected (in the news)
    – Japanese govt. raising emergency level at Fukushima to 7 (in the news)
    – asking flash if he has any inside info on the outcome of the Libyan war (honest question)
    – Telling flash I thought his last post was genuinely funny (true)
    – Explaining my understanding of normalcy bias, as flash brought it up, complete with real-life anecdote (honest answer based on my own knowledge of the theory of normalcy bias)
    – Agreeing that inflation is fairly low by historical standards (this is a fact)
    – Also pointing out that this time we also have 300 year lows in IR’s (fact)
    – Also pointing out that a small increase in inflation or IR’s will put a lot more pressure on those with debts and therefore the outlook for the economy than it would in a more benign scenario (true)

    Where in that lot are any ‘statements or predictions I couldn’t possibly know’?

    It has been massive waste of my time, but at least I have the satisfaction of refuting your accusations for the nonsense they are for all to see.

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  • sibley's b'stard child says:

    How about a nice mug of Horlicks and a group hug?

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  • general congreve: bellwether is coming after you and your response is typical of most cornered or besieged human beings (you’ve retrenched, steadfastly refused to consider any point from your opponent and launched an attack of your own).

    However I think you should quietly reflect on what appears to be the main thrust of his criticism. You do frequently appear to profess great insight, knowledge and certainty on the outcome of what is basically an infinitely complex, kinetic and probably random system. There has never been an intellect or even a super computer that can come close to predicting outcomes with the certainty you often seem to profess. Maybe it’s just a matter of how you express yourself? If I’ve learned anything, it’s that the more I know, the less certain I become. Will you at least consider what I’m saying? Peace to you, my shiny gold brother

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  • general congreve says:

    @32 – Getting in semantics there Flash, but I take your point. However, my original point being that it is impossible (especially with the whole middle east in political turmoil) to say whether things will calm down or escalate in the ‘immediate future’. Your post @5 seemed to imply a certainty that it would ‘calm down’, my response was merely challenging you on the unknowability of that assumed certainty.

    Flippin’ hell, seems more like philosophy than financial debate sometimes!

    By the way I resent the ‘End of Days’ implication. I am no Yankee God Nutter wishing for Armageddon. I just see challenging economic times ahead, as opposed to the official line of ‘recovery’. Hopefully the situation won’t lead to more wars and turmoil in the next couple of decades, but from a geo-political perspective, I imagine it well might.

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  • general congreve says:

    @35 – I do not feel cornered, nor am I lashing out. But I am rightly indignant at BW’s lack of a point and use of an unfounded personal attack, which I have reacted to by putting him straight in a factual and measured way. I will admit I called him a troll, but that is how I see it, that is not lashing out like some crazed lunatic as you wish to imply.

    I would take your second point, if that were really the case, but it is not. I just say what I see. I am not professing the second coming or some other such future event I have no handle on. I am merely saying that the way the world economy and finances are stacked up, it seems that there is only one of two choices for the west, default and depression, or stealth default through inflation and therefore a stagflationary depression. Both of which would be accompanied by major currency depreciation and both of which will work magic for investors in gold/silver.

    Who knows, maybe we are not too far gone and we can somehow turn this ship around with strong economic growth and economic rebalancing. Doesn’t look likely to me from the information available though.

    That is my position, I am sticking to my guns and time will tell. But if I am right, I don’t want anyone telling me I got lucky! That’s the deal.

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  • GC my criticisms are to your postings generally and not to this particular thread which if I’m honest just gave me an opportunity (somewhat unfairly) to express the bee in my bonnet.

    It’s probably partronising but I’d say that I think you have something to say, which is why I tend to engage with you in a way I wouldn’t with the people on here who seem to align themselves with the more outlier views of say Greg Pytel or the Lira Gonzalo or Zero Hedge. I won’t name names but maybe the company one keeps by virtue of keeping a certain view tells you more about the view than does anything else.

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  • Last post before I re-engage with work but GC isn’t your evidence that you’re not playing mystic meg (or russel grant if you prefer) proof that you are!

    “I am merely saying that the way the world economy and finances are stacked up, it seems that there is only one of two choices for the west, default and depression, or stealth default through inflation and therefore a stagflationary depression. Both of which would be accompanied by major currency depreciation and both of which will work magic for investors in gold/silver.”

    For a start there is nothing “mere” about professing that you know as to how the world economy or finances stack up in the present, never mind what that means in the future ie your 2 choices (are they even choices?) and what both choices must lead too.

    By way of disclosure I’d add that these sort of views are eerily similar to mine in 2008/09 when I started on here, but now they just seem both naive and overknowing

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  • general congreve says:

    @38 – First off your criticisms are neither here nor there if they don’t directly challenge me at the time and place with straight out rebuttals. You can’t challenge someone to a fight, not show up and then say they’d have lost anyway if you had turned up. It is just nonsense talk.

    Stop being so cryptic. Man up. Name names. What company I supposedly keeping that is demeaning my message. Otherwise just more pointless drivel.

    If you think I have something to say, discuss it with me instead if throwing about empty off-topic heckles. I can’t honestly remember the last time you posted any valid topical comment to me.

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  • general congreve says:

    @39 – At last, a point of sorts, well done. However, you are twisting my ‘mere’ words. Put semantics aside. I have stated my thoughts on the way things will stack up in the next few years, in my posts I back it up with facts and opinions that I BELIEVE (I’m not asking you to agree) support my position. All are welcome to disagree and call me wrong and argue the counterpoints. But to continue to tell me I am definitely wrong and attack me personally for it is just annoying and does not contribute to debate.

    Like I said, I have my position and until someone else can sufficiently bring worth a valid point(s) to make me change my mind, I am sticking to it.

    You are right that one cannot know the future, however one can make educated guesses at the future. To just throw your hands up in the air and say, “The Gods will decide”, smacks of ignorance and lacks a faith in your own ability to at least try and shape a better outcome for you and your family from the information at hand.

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  • mark wadsworth says:

    Me and SBC are having a Horlicks and a group hug, any takers?

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  • The man doth protest too much.

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  • Flashman @ 1.29pm

    Re the nuclear thing, I was simply wondering if unlike to BP outcome things with nuclear could go in the opposite direction and get much worse.

    On the HPC I’m thinking that interest rates, particularly in the light of the extra squeeze from all direction on the family budget, may play a bigger part than unemployment, or as big a part anyway.

    Of course they may not increase interest rates more than a couple of % for a very long time, I guess none of us know for sure.
    It seems pretty clear that policy is with supporting house prices where possible even if there are random statements about relaxing planning laws, building more houses etc etc.

    Anyway, I was just interested in your current view really.

    Mine is that for my own sanity I need to own something and it seems I’ve stumbled across something I like that isn’t budget busting and can be improved relatively economically.
    Fortunately the nature of this paricular house leaves many options still open so I can still look forward to an HPC knowing I’m only gaining ground at half the pace I was, which is good enough for me as I’m not greedy.

    So I haven’t sold out completely, but getting on with a project – while money is still cheap and available.

    On the subject of availability has there been talk in your circles about a timescale for nationalised banks to be privatised – I just wondered as I suspect once they are they might start acting more stringently than at present and that in itself may also have leanings to the HPC.

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  • GC @37: bellwether most certainly does have a point and your response leads me to the resigned conclusion that you are not receptive to being deflected by anything other than a set of notions that appear to be formed by your nature rather than any nurture. You do have a tendency to dissemble when presented with iron clad criticisms and I am never sure if that’s because you don’t understand the criticism or because you are using the politicians technique of answering a different question to the one you were asked. One quick question, do you think anyone could reasonably accuse you of expressing certainty on the future path of gold prices? Think about it and all that it implies.

    You have often responded to bellwether and other detractors by claiming that they are only resorting to attacking you because you have been proved right in your predictions of the imminent collapse of fiat etc and the consequent rise in gold prices. Has it ever occurred to you that you might actually have been monstrously wrong in your predictions, in that gold might have gone up (here’s the clue: almost everything has gone up), for the exact opposite scenario to the one you predicted, namely that the worlds economy is steadily improving and more and more of the world population has the wherewithal to buy stuff. I think you should also chew on the fact that people like Warren Buffet or Bill Gates etc etc would think that you were a fruit loop for predicting the imminent collapse of Fiat currency. I hate to say it but I think you are a bit of a wombat for being convinced that you know better than people of that stature.

    On your comments @36: I did not imply that you are an end of days merchant. I was making the philosophical point that things would “calm down a bit” even if the world ends. If they have a ceasefire for two days then it could be said to have calmed down a bit. It might subsequently escalate again and then calm down again. One day the cameras will relocate to another hotspot and there will be again be people telling us that this is the ‘big one’. You have to understand that hardly anything works on an upward only ratchet system. No time frame or scale can reasonably be implied from the innocuous expression “when it calms down a bit”. Be honest, you felt pressured, so you desperately scanned through all the comments and pounced on any old crumb you could find to make a weak tit for tat style argument. This is what I actually said:

    “It will be interesting to see what happens to energy prices etc, when Libya and Japan calm down a bit”

    You are being a bit silly if you are sticking to your tit for tat style story that I somehow expressed some sort of bombastic certainty, complete with implied timelines. You can be better than that GC.

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  • contrails are not a conspiracy (formerly npnh) says:

    Blimey – hasn’t got much better since I have been away! Feels a little like same personalities with different names in here.

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  • str: Interest rates will always have an effect but even if they quadruple, they will still be low. My long ago posted correlation analysis showed a strong positive correlation between unemployment and house prices and surprisingly almost no correlation between interest rates and house prices (data from several countries across several decades). That does not in itself guarantee that past correlations will hold going forward but it does help me to to fight against seductively intuitive ideas like interest rates seriously affecting house prices. My chances of house price success are increased by a scientific approach but they are far from guaranteed, if that makes sense. There is always a first for everything.

    Regarding the privatisation of banks: It is assumed that they will all be privatised by the end of 2012 and that the government will make a packet from the sales, just in time for a give away election budget. It is also assumed that credit availability will start to noticeably increase by the end of this year and that it will be almost back up to full strength by the end of 2012

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  • general congreve says:

    @44 – I fold. You’ve finally worn me down. I couldn’t focus by the third paragraph. I am off for a Horlicks with MW and SBC.

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  • Flashman @ 3.53pm

    Then it’s clearly a good job I’m buying me thinks, if not to a level of full exposure so to speak.

    I am surprised though by what you say with regard to credit availability and it’s increase. When sorting out mortgages Barclays who I’ve banked with for years were incredibly conservative – even though I have an unblemished credit history.
    Yet the government owned banks couldn’t give it away fast enough. To the point I was offered more than double the requested amount.

    This suggested to me that in some way the government were ‘backing/supporting’ the housing market, whereas the private banks most certainly were not.

    This may well be an incorrect conclusion but seemed odd that a non government owned bank essentially wasn’t that interested in lending.

    Anyway this is where I gleaned my (perhaps incorrect) conclusion that things may tighten up when our government owned banks are sold off.

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  • GC you stood your ground well where it’s far easier for me initiating in the role of the debunker – probably also why which of us is to play that role is about the only thing we are now actually arguing over.

    It perhaps got a little too bloody/direct but I’ve taken none of what you’ve had to say too personally and actually rather hope you can do likewise.

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  • Str: I’ve been with Barclays since the early 80’s. My business and personal accounts have never had a blemish in all that time but they act like you’ve got the pox if you ask for so much as a complimentary biro. I’ve got a Premier Banking manager who is very frustrated by his employer and says that their priorities are elsewhere at the moment. I don’t think we can necessarily judge things by their shittyness

    There have been several credit crunches before and they nearly always drag on for a few years. This one will probably be no different. As soon as they feel threaten by their competitors (especially new ones) getting market share, they will start to crank out some more loans. They’ve already started handing out the odd self-cert, which seemed impossible six months ago. The money markets will be more conservative than in the old days, for the foreseeable future, so I still can’t see them lending at the old frantic levels

    Good luck with the house.

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  • Not just me then !

    Cheers.

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  • phdinbubbles says:

    “Besides, Japan has just raised the emergency level at Fukushima has been upgraded to Level 7 (same as Chernobyl), things are getting worse not better. ”

    All you need to do is spend around 2 minutes reading the news (see for example, this) to understand that the Level 7 thing doesn’t relate to a worsening of the current situation at Fukushima.

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  • it’s a shame u get so much bitching & personal attacks on this site. maybe that’s why we’ve lost so many fascinating contributors over the years, such as japanese uncle, lvm reader, planning4acrash, sold2rent1 etc etc perhaps they’ve been bullied off. where r u sold2rent 1 ? when u spoke about a forthcoming change of consciousness, u were set upon. now who’s laughing as the middle east fires have reached Saudi

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  • general congreve says:

    @53 – Well said that man.

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  • One mans interesting poster is another 10 mens irritating freak. The mods have banned most of the loony tunes because they ruined the credibility of the house price message with their incessant David Ike style spamming. str1 with his Mayan water cars? End of days gold freaks and New World Order loons, interesting? Do me a favour. If you like that sort of thing then go to a site that is designed for it.

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  • general congreve says:

    @55 – Wasn’t agreeing that S2R1 wasn’t a bit David Icke (he was), I was agreeing with the the general sentiment of the post. You see you don’t need to agree 100% with everything a poster says to find some common ground and have a reasonable conversation, while politely agreeing to disagree if need be.

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  • A poster has to be capable of reason before there can be a reasonable conversation

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