Thursday, November 18, 2010

Morbidly Obese Politician unveils NIMBYs Charter

Pickles promises 'people's planning power'

"Communities in England will get the power to decide where no shops, offices and homes are to be built, the government will announce. Under the plans, local referendums will be held, which could force councils to adopt "neighbourhood plans" to block all new developments. The government will also offer financial incentives to encourage the "right kind of development", primarily "none". Communities Secretary Eric Pickles said this would mean "more people-planning for no new developments and less politician-planning for no new developments... For far too long local people have had too little say in turning down planning applications, and the planning system imposed bureaucratic zero targets by distant officials in Whitehall and the town hall."

Posted by mark wadsworth @ 11:33 AM (1582 views)
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17 thoughts on “Morbidly Obese Politician unveils NIMBYs Charter

  • Good news for lancashire mill towns and durham pit villages, whose residents will be more than happy for new developments to regenerate the area. Bad news for the bucolic retirement home of hampshire.

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  • So wealthy people in sparsley populated areas will block all development, while poorer densely populated areas will have more buildings shoehorned into overbuilt places. So what’s new?

    Eric Pickles was once described as having all the grace of a trotting rhinoceros. Unkind to rhinos I say.

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  • sibley's b'stard child says:

    Great, central govt don’t want new houses and local govt won’t, no doubt, want new houses. You can’t build your own house. I’d pitch a tent in the middle of a busy roundabout – like that fella in Wolverhampton – but i’d just get moved on by the ‘man’.

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  • i reckon 99% of people in rural areas would welcome quality housing, rather than industrial or supermarkets

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  • Mark, I reckon 99% of people in rural areas in the south east will block any development. However, there are numerous post-industrial villages and towns across the north/midlands with populations who are more interested in local jobs being created than the view out of their window/keeping house prices high. There’s plenty of post-industrial land to build on as well. It’s much easier to attract young, educated people to areas with job prospects and cheaper housing (away from the nimbys).

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  • LTF – how do the wealthy get more votes exactly? Or are you simply suggesting that the poor are less likely to get involved in the process due to time constraints?

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  • possibly the wealthier are better educated and will learn how to use the system to their advantage rather than the poor who will look at how to use the benefits system and not really care much about development

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  • mark,
    Maybe but that’s no reasonable argument against a democratic process, rather it’s an argument for better education 🙂

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  • 51ck
    As you say, they are more likely to get involved – more to lose because of their advantage, more used to getting their own way, more influence because of societal biases, etc

    Democracy is somewhat notional – votes all count the same, but votes are often unrepresentative of the population as we know.

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  • “…For far too long local people have had too little say in turning down planning applications…”

    Erm, is this just me that thinks this is total ballocks ? Anybody how can READ and WRITE has the ability to object to a development
    application. It’s easy, all you have to do is read the council’s planning “local plan” to see what is not acceptable, choose 2 or 3 applicable
    points, and do a copy n paste into an objection letter/fax/email/online form. Job done, couldn’t be easier.

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  • doomwatch

    from my understanding

    the council don’t have to take local opinion into account, they can consider it they can also choose to ignore it

    if there is a public meeting if no-one attends then the planning cannot go ahead, if only 1 member of public attends then the planning can go ahead

    correct me if I am wrong

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  • just found this

    http://www.yourrights.org.uk/news/case-studies/all-public-authorities-must-respect-human-rights.shtml

    interesting article

    I think the law regarding public meetings might have changes, i remember being told about it some years back so it may no longer be the case.

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  • it_is_going_with_a_bang says:

    I can think of quite a few planning applications that have made it through the council – much to the disgust of most local people.
    Local people generally seem to have no rights whatsoever apart from highlighting possible infringements of planning policy that otherwise may go unnoticed.

    Whilst I would have loved to have told a developer to go “somewhere” nicely no so long ago, it makes me wonder just how many houses would ever get built around exisiting houses – as people generally do not want any development in their vicinity.

    Based on that the idea sounds a little absurd.

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  • @ 10

    “”… For far too long local people have had too little say in turning down planning applications …”
    Erm, is this just me that thinks this is total ballocks?”

    No, it’s anyone who took the trouble to read the original (below), as opposed to MW’s heavily doctored version, quoted above.

    “For far too long local people have had too little say over a planning system that has imposed bureaucratic decisions by distant officials in Whitehall and the town hall.”

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  • Greenmind, why are you linking to hard core NIMBY-porn? That site is not about ‘communities against developers’ it is about ‘haves against have-nots’.

    People who live in houses (as do most NIMBYs) slagging off ‘developers’ are as twattish as car drivers slagging off car manufacturers or ‘Big Oil’. Or as nauseating as people who go on holiday and then complain about all the tourists. Until every last NIMBY has paid to have his house demolished and turned back into pasture and has moved into local authority B&B accommodation, an overpriced one-bed flat or a mobile caravan, I refuse to listen to a word they say.

    Doggett, I changed the words to the true meaning, rather than parrotting the BBC parrotting the NIMBYs.

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  • MW – the link and accompanying slogan of mine was firmly tongue in cheek as the site is a particulalrly good example of NIMBYISM in action. On the odd occasion objections to specific developments can have merit. However if the need to build new homes to keep up with demographic pressures goes unstated then the objection can be thrown in the NIMBY bin straight away without further consideration.

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