Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Repossessed man goes nuts

Repossessed man goes nuts

how much can someone take?......sleepeing on the streets,repossessed,failed sale???????yes there is some responsibility but why take him to court was goodwin or hornby taken anywhere near a court....at some point,the ants are gonna go completely nuts

Posted by taffee @ 06:29 PM (2939 views)
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22 thoughts on “Repossessed man goes nuts

  • This is exactly what Gerald Celente has been forecasting ”When people lose everything. They lose it”

    He is also notable for investing 80% of his money in gold.

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  • the real problem here is there are no council houses…1988 6 mill now just 1 mill,…so there is nowhere for these people to go…add the trashing of credit report=no hope

    this guy cannot get a property but immigrants can…oh sorry was I racist?…its just nuts

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  • how come he as he said had a bad credit history so he borrowed more than he could pay and sent his kids to a private school, wonder if he had a 60in tv too…

    whilst it is bad , this is also an example of greed too.

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  • the whole system is at fault and everyone is guily imo…its just the ants will get more of a bashing

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  • If you loose a home I suggest renting is no option as credit checks seem to be as stringent as for mortgages. Also, if you couldn’t afford a mortgage how on earth could you afford to rent as it’s more expensive.

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  • the private rented sector is a disaster….its all weighted toward the landlord and offers zero security

    there is serious social unrest coming imo

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  • This story is from two years ago and whilst I hope he’s managing to rebuild his life, I find it difficult to feel that sorry for him.

    Instead of the private education for the kids why didn’t he use the money to pay down the mortgage or save it instead? Why did he increase to a 300k mortgage after he was injured and at his age? – instead of down-sizing – this was before the crash (he lost his job in 2006) when house selling was easy and I bet he could have found quite a decent house in or near Rochdale for half the price. Although he was clearly not well, blaming it on the bank for lending him the money isn’t rational; neither was trying to maintain a lifestyle by borrowing more money after a financial set-back. But yes, the lenders deserve a spanking for being stupid (but didn’t they carry a loss for their mistake?)

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  • 6. taffee said…
    there is serious social unrest coming imo

    People keep saying this, but I just can’t see it happening in the UK. The last major upset we had was what, the Poll Tax riots in 1990?

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  • 600 metres and a helicopter! this is whay the the axe can be weilded in the police force and it wont make a blind bit of difference to front line services or those that actually reflect some sort of common sense anyway.

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  • People keep saying this, but I just can’t see it happening in the UK.

    Lets just see what happens when the strikes start.

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  • We do have some history of rioting:

    • 1355 – St. Scholastica riot, (Oxford, England)
    • 1517 – Evil May Day, (London, England)
    • 1607 – Midlands Uprising, (Northamptonshire/Warwickshire/Leicestershire, England)
    • 1668 – Messenger riots, (London, England) “Bawdy house Riots.”
    • 1675 – Weavers riot, (London, England)
    • 1715 – English Political Riot, (London, England)
    • 1721 – English Servants Riot, (London, England)
    • 1727 – English Anti-Turnpike Riot, (Bristol, England)
    • 1733 – London Anti-Tax Riot, (London, England)
    • 1735 – English Anti-Turnpike Riots, (Hereford/Worcester, England)
    • 1736 – Anti-Irish Riots, (Shoreditch/Spitalfields/Whitechapel, England)
    • 1736 – Porteous Riots, (Edinburgh, Scotland)
    • 1738 – Wiltshire Weavers Riot, (Wiltshire, England)
    • 1746 – Anti-Catholic Riots,[citation needed] (Sunderland/Liverpool, England)
    • 1753 – English Anti-Turnpike Riots,[citation needed] (Leeds/Wakefield/Beeston, England)
    • 1757 – English Anti-Militia Riots,[citation needed] (East Anglia/Lincoln/Northampton/East Riding of Yorkshire, England)
    • 1761 – Northumberland Miners Riot,[citation needed] (Yorkshire, England)
    • 1763 – Anti-Irish Riots,[citation needed] (Covent Garden, England)
    • 1763 – Weavers Riots,[citation needed] (England)
    • 1769 – Spitalfield Riots (Spitalfields (London), England)
    • 1772-1773 – English Food Riots,[citation needed] (England)
    • 1773 – English Weavers Riots[citation needed] (England)
    • 1779 – English Spinners Riot, (Chorley, England)
    • 1780 – Gordon Riots, (London, England)
    • 1794 – English Anti-Recruitment Riots,[citation needed] (England)
    • 1795 – English Food Riots,[citation needed] (England)
    • 1796 – English riots against the Militia Laws[citation needed] (Lincolnshire, England)
    • 1809 – Old Price Riots, 1809, (London, England)
    • 1811-1812 – English Luddite Riots, (Leicester/York, England)
    o 1814 – English Luddite Riots of 1814, (Leicester/York, England)
    o 1816 – English Luddite Riots of 1816, (Leicester/York, England)
    • 1831 – Bristol Riots (Bristol, England)
    • 1886 – Belfast Home Rule Riots, Belfast, Ireland)
    • 1910 – Tonypandy Riot (South Wales, UK)
    • 1919 – Battle of Bow Street, (Bow Street, London, UK)
    • 1919 – Luton Peace Day Riots, Luton U.K.
    • 1920 – Belfast and Derry riots of 1920 (Belfast and Derry, Ireland during July 1920)
    • 1921 – Belfast riots of 1921 (Belfast, Northern Ireland during July–December 1921)
    • 1922 – Belfast riots of 1922 (Belfast, Northern Ireland during January–June 1922)
    • 1936 – Battle of Cable Street, (London, England)
    • 1958 – Nottingham race riots, (Nottingham, England)
    • 1958 – Notting Hill race riots, (Notting Hill, London, England)
    • 1964 – Divis Street Riots, July 1964 (Belfast)
    • 1969 – Burntollet riot (near Derry, Northern Ireland on 4 January 1969)
    • 1969 – Battle of the Bogside (Derry, Northern Ireland on 12–14 August 1969)
    • 1969 – 1969 Northern Ireland Riots (throughout Northern Ireland on 14–17 August 1969)
    • 1970 – Falls Curfew (Belfast, Northern Ireland on 3–5 July 1970)
    • 1971 – Camden Riots, August 1971, (Camden, New Jersey, United States)
    • 1971 – Operation Demetrius (Northern Ireland on August 9–11, 1971)
    • 1972 – Bloody Sunday (Derry, Northern Ireland on 30 January 1972)
    • 1972 – Operation Motorman (Northern Ireland on 31 July 1972)
    • 1974 – Ulster Workers’ Council strike (Northern Ireland, May 1974)
    • 1975 – Chapeltown riot Leeds, West Yorkshire ,England
    • 1975 – European cup Final 1975, Leeds United riot in Paris
    • 1976 – Notting Hill Carnival Riot (London, England)
    • 1979 – Southall Riots, (Southall, West London, England)
    • 1980 – St Pauls riot, April 1980, (St Pauls, Bristol, England)
    • 1981 – Brixton riot of 1981, (London, England)
    • 1981 – Toxteth riots (Liverpool, England)
    • 1981 – Moss Side riots (Manchester, England)
    • 1981 – Chapeltown riot Leeds, West Yorkshire, England
    • 1981 – First Handsworth Riot, (Birmingham, England)
    • 1985 – Drumcree riots (Portadown, Northern Ireland, July 1985)
    • 1985 – Brixton riot of 1985, September 28, (London, England)
    • 1985 – Second Handsworth Riot, September 11, (Birmingham, England)
    • 1985 – Broadwater Farm Riot, Oct. 6, (London, England)
    • 1986 – Drumcree riots (Portadown, Northern Ireland, April and July 1986)
    • 1987 – Chapeltown riot Leeds, West Yorkshire ,England
    • 1989 – Dewsbury riot
    • 1989 – Leeds United riots / Birmingham
    • 1990 – Poll Tax Riots, (London)
    • 1990 – Salford, (Greater Manchester, UK), July
    • 1991 – Meadowell Riots, (North Tyneside, UK), Sseptember
    • 1995 – Brixton riot of 1995, (London, England)
    • 1995 – Hyde Park Riot, July 1995, Leeds, West Yorkshire
    • 1995 – Manningham Riot, June 1995, (Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK)
    • 1995 – Drumcree riots, July 1995, (Portadown, Northern Ireland)
    • 1995 – Lansdowne Road Football Riots, English Hooliganism, (Lansdowne Road, Dublin, Ireland)
    • 1996 – Drumcree riots, July 1996, (Portadown, Northern Ireland)
    • 1997 – Drumcree riots, July 1997, (Portadown, Northern Ireland)
    • 1998 – Drumcree riots, July 1998, (Portadown, Northern Ireland)
    • 2001 – Oldham Riots, May 2001, (Oldham, Greater Manchester, England)
    • 2001 – Harehills riot Leeds, June 2001, West Yorkshire, England
    • 2001 – Bradford Riot, July 2001, (Bradford, West Yorkshire, England)
    • 2001 – Holy Cross dispute, Summer 2001, (Belfast, Northern Ireland)
    • 2003 – Caia Park Riots, Wrexham, Wales[citation needed]
    • 2004 – Boston, Lincolnshire. Fans rioted after England was knocked out of the European football championships.
    • 2005 – Worst riot seen in Ireland after Orange Order Parade was banned from marching through a Catholic area, (Belfast, Northern Ireland)[citation needed]
    • 2005 – Reading festival riot, approximately 150000 music fans rioted for 3 nights just for the fun of it (England)[citation needed]
    • 2005 – 2005 Birmingham race riots in Lozells, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    • 2007 – Riots in London, United Kingdom at the Notting Hill Carnival.[citation needed]
    • 2008 – Riots in London, United Kingdom at the Notting Hill Carnival. 488 arrests made.[citation needed]
    • 2008 – Riots in London, United Kingdom after Chelsea FC Football match[citation needed]
    • 2009 – Riots in Northern Ireland, United Kingdom after three alleged Provisional Irish Republican Army dissidents were arrested on suspicion of killing two British soldiers and a police officer, in an attack designed to trigger wider violence in Northern Ireland.
    • 2009 – Riots in Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Before and after a football game at Windsor park in Belfast, United Kingdom against Poland. The game also got stopped for 5mins due to a linesman being hit by an object thrown from the Northern Ireland Supporters.
    • 2009 – G20 riots in London, United Kingdom. Protesters stormed and broke into the RBS bank and smashed up equipment inside the bank and smashed windows. 350 people arrested. One person dead after police intervention.[citation needed]
    • 2009 – Prison riot at Ashwell prison, England, United Kingdom. Hundreds of inmates rioted and set fire to buildings.[citation needed]
    • 2009 – Riots in Brighton, United Kingdom where 2,000 joined an anti-capitalist march in Brighton[citation needed]
    • 2009 – Football violence at soccer/football game between West Ham United F.C. fans and Stoke City F.C. fans, both inside the stadium and outside. United Kingdom
    • 2009 – Luton, United Kingdom, riot against Muslim extremists who disrupted a homecoming parade of British soldiers, May 24
    • 2009 – Riots in Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom. The riots have been blamed on the Real IRA after Orange Order parades around Northern Ireland. Twenty one police officers where injured and gun shots where fired at police. Three vans were also hijacked and two of them were pushed at police lines. Other riots broke out around Northern Ireland, in Derry, Armagh, Rasharkin.[citation needed]
    • 2009 – Riots in Birmingham, United Kingdom when far-right activists clash with anti-racism protesters and local members of the Muslim and Afro-Caribbean community on August 8, 2009.[24][25]
    • 2009 – Football violence before, at and after a Carling Cup match between West Ham United and Millwall in London at Upton Park. There where also 3 pitch invasions.
    • 2009 – Small riots in Harrow, London as the right-wing demonstrators English Defence League who claim to oppose only ‘extremist Islam’, were faced by over a thousand anti-fascists protesters from the Unite Against Fascism in Harrow central.[citation needed]
    • 2009 – Small riots outside the BBC headquarters in London, United Kingdom as Nick Griffin, the leader of the extreme right-wing group British National Party, as he appeared on BBC’s show ‘Question Time’. Protesters also stormed inside the building.[citation needed]
    • 2010 – Riots in Northern Ireland. Police estimate that million in damages have been caused, and over 80 police officers injured by nationalist rioters.[54]

    Stolen from Wikipedia

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  • The big shot out all over America is yet to come. They will not stop crushing civil rights untill that day comes.

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  • phdinbubbles, that’s a nice list, thanks.

    The major issues appear to be:
    – Northern Ireland
    – Football
    – Racial conflicts
    – Prison riots

    Few (if any) riots in the last 100 years are related to poverty or inequality. Of those which are, the Poll Tax riots and (arguably) the G20 protests, both started the day as legitimate protest marches; the actual number of rioters was quite small.

    My point is that we’re not in a Marie Antoinette situation, where a starving mob is told “Let them eat cake”. The majority of the population are broadly supportive of the status quo, and I don’t see that changing unless inequality (both income and wealth) rises far higher.

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  • @drewster

    Yes you’re right, although it could be argued that some of the northern ireland/racial conflicts are related to poverty and inequality but that the target for the resentment is misplaced. In fact the ‘troubles’ in Northern Ireland began with a movement campaigning against inequality. Football hooligans and prisoners probably just like a good fight once in a while. We do have one of the most stable liberal democracies in the world (at least for the last few hundred years in mainland britain), so it is hard to envisage anything major kicking off.

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  • Unlikely alliances will form quickly, once a common enemy is perceived.

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  • Perhaps we’ll see a march of hapless banksters trudging from the City to Jarrow, protesting against sub-prime defaulters.

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  • devo,

    That’s precisely the problem – there is no readily identifiable enemy. It’s as bad as the “war on terror”.

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  • Just follow the money (clichés are clichés for a reason).

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  • He cost us, the taxpayer, £20,000 and was punished for it. How much did the bank bailouts cost us and what was the punishment?

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  • Yes Taffee you are racist, and what this article has to do with council housing i’m not entirely sure.

    In my experience, immigrants care for the elderly, clean offices, douse customers palms in clubs with perfume and work in shit fast food restuarants for crap pay, whilst British born and bred spend their dole money drinking, going to clubs, using more of the health service than they contribute to and get fat stuffing their faces with double whoppers.

    Now back to the actual post, did you any of you read the bit where he said “they offered me £250,000, it was too good to refuse”. Well it wasn’t was it, he could have refused it, he could have taken less, but he took the full amount that he couldn’t pay back. The lender could have allowed the sale of the house, but once you renege on a contract the effect that you are no longer able to exert control over the asset that formed the subject of it. He did know this, he was told this and he went ahead anyway.

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  • It’s easy to blame opportunistic bankers and landlords but what needs to change is the political system. Change is happening so quickly I find it hard to keep up! Our system simply can’t keep up and is obviously suseptible and vulnerable to corruption. I think it’s important to dilute the influence of the three political parties and encourage coalition governments. I realise that there are downsides of coalitions but it works in many places very effectively. Unpoliticising councils would be a good step as well.

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