Friday, July 9, 2010

Intra-company transfer (ICT) permits

Vote : Should the Government include ICTs within the planned “cap” on migration?

Intra-company transfer (ICT) permits might not be included in the Government's proposed cap on migration, based on current proposals. Should the Government include ICTs within the planned “cap” on migration? IMO ICTs are abused to bring cheap labour into the UK, to the detriment of the UK labour force, especially by "consultancies".

Posted by doomwatch @ 08:44 AM (1694 views)
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9 thoughts on “Intra-company transfer (ICT) permits

  • happy mondays says:

    We have no leaders, only politicians! Who lap dance to big business & prostitute themselves to get votes!
    We need to get beyond this thinking that economic growth is the way forward & take an evolutionary step to building a stable future for ourselves & future generations..A revolution of the mind is needed ! When ? is anyones guess, probably after tipping point..

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  • happy mondays says:

    Sorry doomwatch i posted the above in the wrong place! Still way to early for me…Another coffee maybe..

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  • economic growth might not be the way forward but jobs growth is definitely required!!!

    We will soon have 10% unemployment rate.

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  • Cap-and-trade. Set a cap on the number of intra-company transfer permits, then sell them to the highest bidder. The most economically efficient outcome is thereby guaranteed.

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  • montesquieu says:

    I’m sorry but in terms of immigration there are two sources where I have zero problem, one is corporate hires, many of whom will eventually move back or move on, and academics, where we need to be able to hire the best in the world. Freedom of movement benefits Brits in similar situations and we rightly complain if our own movements are restricted. If there are any areas for exclusion from the cap, it’s here.

    We all know our immigration problems are not caused by a small number of finance workers or consultants brought in by Accenture or UBS, but by:

    * waves of illiterate or ill-educated people from poor countries (mainly in the Indian subcontinent), nowadays mostly coming in on family connections so untouched by the points-based system which by and large has ended easy large-scale immigration from outside the EU. Unfortunately this door was bolted far too late and as far as Labour’s legacy goes, this one has still some way to run

    * asylum seekers (a number of whom are genuine, but large numbers of which are simply taking the piss due to over-generous interpretation in various higher courts of the ‘rules’ and are simply economic migrants from a different set of poor countries looking to better themselves). This group is particularly good at queue-jumping in public services leading to much resistance among those who have most contact with them, ie the UK’s indigenous urban poor (and by this group I mean long-standing UK ethnic groups as well).

    * Eastern Europeans, the majority of whom are hard-working, perfectly legitimate and should be welcomed on the same basis we expect a welcome in France, Spain or Germany, but with a substantial minority of benefit bludgers, tax dodgers and out-and-out gangsters who again have seemingly acquired mastery in playing the game with social services – leading (as above) to friction with locals.

    * lastly but possibly most importantly, illegals – the people the system just doesn’t know about of which there are (in many estimates) millions from all over the world. Mechanisms to deal with this such as ID cards have been canned so the Tories seem to have no plan to even address this at all.

    None of this has anything to do with a small number of inter-company transfers and attempts to link them are just nonsensical IMO.

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  • montesquieu @5 , Perhaps I can persuade you that you are mistaken ?

    Companies like Accenture , Cap Gemini even IBM have large development shops out in India handling everything from software development to accounting .

    One of their most lucrative services is offshoring outsourcing operations currently done by their clients UK workers . Their revenue comes from the savings of moving UK jobs to India , they reckon the optimum is 70% of an accounting department workforce in India 30% in UK .

    The 30% (accounting) , <30% (I.T.) left in the UK are required for liason with the local customers . That is the only part left in the UK .

    The intra-company transfers are a way of erroding the remaining 30% of jobs which are left and accelerating the offshore outsourcing .

    The complaint that there is a skills shortage in the U.K. is an outrageous lie .
    Companies find it easier to lobby numptys in whitehall than pay the going rate .
    A software developer in the Southeast will usually be on a total package lower than a police constable , never mind a sergeant .

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  • Drewster @4

    I like your suggestion of Cap and Trade .

    Set a reserve price of £75,000 per person per year to protect the jobs of UK workers . That is a surefire way of finding out whether there really is a skills shortage in UK or whether companies are just baulking at paying the going rate .

    Maybe the trading should be Dutch auction style ?

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  • Correct, no doubt there are legitimate uses of ICT, so that internationals can move their staff around. But in information technology there have been flagrant abuses. Whilst Gordon was talking about British ‘Skills Shortages’, aka the ICT lobby, I was seeking unemployment because my clients had all decided to use brand new IT intensively farmed chicken coups in Bangalore. Basically British professionals were being sacrificed as being over-priced in the global market for sitting in a chair producing logic. Somebody somewhere had the bright idea that this specialised activity: software construction, was divorced from cultural attributes, and was essentially a robotic and abstract endeavour. It isn’t. Labour just helped companies make profit from of the uncounted and undocumented social fallout that the lobby was designed to produce.

    Now, though, even the non specialists are finding that far from being a low-level blue collar job, IT is still a valuable and difficult profession. We will have transplanted our information technology sector wholesale to India, only when we have also exported our music industry and marketing. British IT professionals were betrayed by the recent Labour government. There is some hope that the coalition will recognise the damage that has been done to British industry, and to a profession by looking into obvious abuses of ICT.

    I believe that the whole outsourcing bandwagon was started by banks seeding growth markets in Asia.

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  • Goldbug99999 says:

    “We all know our immigration problems are not caused by a small number of finance workers or consultants brought in by Accenture or UBS”

    … in macro economic terms no, but try telling that to recent IT/accounting graduates whos opportunities to get that first trainee position have been decimated by the use of junior ICT staff.

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