Wednesday, June 9, 2010

Declaration of intent on Housing

Planning Policy Statement 3 (PPS3): Housing

Strategic housing policy objectives 9. The Government’s key housing policy goal is to ensure that everyone has the opportunity of living in a decent home, which they can afford, in a community where they want to live. To achieve this, the Government is seeking: – To achieve a wide choice of high quality homes, both affordable and market housing, to address the requirements of the community. – To widen opportunities for home ownership and ensure high quality housing for those who cannot afford market housing, in particular those who are vulnerable or in need. – To improve affordability across the housing market, including by increasing the supply of housing. – To create sustainable, inclusive, mixed communities in all areas, both urban and rural.

Posted by dill @ 03:50 PM (1194 views)
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7 thoughts on “Declaration of intent on Housing

  • …blablablablabla… action speaks louder than words, something Gordon Brown never grasped and quangoland burueacrats never will either.

    I think the problem with delivery has more to do with the basic development model and land banking rather than the supply of land with planning permission. Land value = open market value minus construction costs, infra, S106 and profit margin.

    In a falling market, with the value of the land calculated and paid for in advance, the sums dont add up when it comes time commence building.

    Also, why are Regional Spatial Strategieis still mentioned in the latest (June 2010) PPS3 mentione Regional Spatial Strategies when Cameron said he would can them?

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  • It’s all talk, I want to live in a decent house in the community of Chelsea please, oh wait 10 million other people want to do the same, hmm slight issue there now isn’t there…..

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  • mark wadsworth says:

    That’s Comedy Gold!

    Never in the field of human history have so many people been so many lies in such a short excerpt.

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  • I thought we were supposed to be getting a free market from the Tories and their Orange Book pals.This is all about planning and targets.
    Some razor blades among the flannel: there seems to be a disturbing emphasis on compulsory purchase in the assembly of sites process.In other words if some geezer won’t sell his land or holds out against the planners then its kerbong! It all sounds like a cross between Stalin and the Eton Boating Song to me .Straight Stalinism is preferable.

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  • tenant super says:

    “everyone has the opportunity of living in a decent home, which they can afford, in a community where they want to live

    That is silly. I want to live in a community like Gerrards Cross or perhaps I want to return to my Surrey routes and have a home in Stoke d’Abernon. Or stay in London… maybe one of the nicer parts of NW3 where I have lots of friends. But I am unlikely to ever be able to afford the former and I will certainly never be able to afford the latter and such is life.

    “sustainable, inclusive, mixed communities”. Now here’s the rub. When such communities evolve over decades, they tend to work quite well. The village of Pyrford where my Grandfather was a council tenant for thirty years and had friends from his prayer group who lived in multi million pound homes at the other end of the village was a good example of a sustainable mixed community. My own area in East dulwich next to a small council estate that is now 30% private is also an example of where it has worked in the city.

    Build a block of flats or row of houses and have tenants on welfare living next to people in identical homes they are busting their guts to pay a mortgage on, you get resentments. My friend has years of experience as a housing officer and says it doesn’t work; the social tenants have different lifestyles and aspirations. Then you have the apartheid where social tenants have a different entrance, can’t use the gymn and the playground is out-of-bounds to their kids as these are optional extras which private owners do not want to share (you try explaining this to a four year old). Part of the problem is that because of the shortage of social housing, those who have enough points these days to qualify often have severe multiple health, social and personal problems which exacerbates tensions.

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  • um… this looks incredibly similar to this document published under labour in November 2006

    http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20100520022021/http://www.communities.gov.uk/documents/planningandbuilding/pdf/planningpolicystatement3.pdf

    the likeness is remarkable, in fact I haven’t found a difference yet (including the ‘cancelled policies’ bit). Didn’t we just vote for a new government ?

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  • mark wadsworth says:

    Camem’ awesome! I have saved the links and will cobble together a post on the back of it.

    reCaptcha: home weepy

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