Sunday, Nov 08, 2009

Disturbing if true ... what else have they lied about and why?

Timesonline: Home Office covered up immigration risk

Labour's “open door” immigration policy knowingly risked allowing dangerous people to settle in Britain unchecked, according to documents seen by The Sunday Times.
The Whitehall correspondence, which was illegally withheld by the Home Office for four years, shows how ministers were told by the country’s most senior immigration official that his staff were to be “encouraged to take risks” when granting visas, work permits and extended residency to hundreds of thousands of new migrants.

Posted by nopensionnohouse @ 06:55 PM (1485 views)
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14 Comments

1. quiet guy said...

'Labour's “open door” immigration policy knowingly risked allowing dangerous people to settle in Britain unchecked'

Dangerous people? Investment bankers, perhaps?

Seriously, I know things are a bit slow on the blog right now but this is house price non-story.

Sunday, November 8, 2009 07:06PM Report Comment
 

2. hpwatcher said...

Seriously, I know things are a bit slow on the blog right now but this is house price non-story.

Of course it's related - supply and demand!

Sunday, November 8, 2009 07:17PM Report Comment
 

3. drewster said...

The relationship to house prices is tenuous. However the immigration point was constantly cited by housing bulls as evidence as to why house prices would rise forever. If the next government closes the stable door, it may well affect the housing market.

I know some people don't believe that poorly-paid migrants can have much effect on house prices, but that's clearly untrue. Immigrants need to live somewhere. Even if they live three to a room in a shabby bedsit in Willesden, they are paying a landlord, who in turn is paying the mortgage. Also their willingness to work for low wages means more profit for their employers, who may then choose to spend the money on a house in a nice part of town. Landlords and employers benefit; immigrants themselves benefit; but everybody in between loses out.

Sunday, November 8, 2009 07:33PM Report Comment
 

4. quiet guy said...

Oh c'mon hpwatcher. The biggest factor in the house price boom, by far, was an excess of cheap money for mortgages and the bizarre tax advantages that property has compared to productive activity.

Your own article summary is about government dishonesty - not property prices.

I'm sorry if my criticism hurt your feelings but I'm wary of blaming immigrants for property speculation - very much a home grown problem the way I see it.

Sunday, November 8, 2009 07:42PM Report Comment
 

5. hpwatcher said...

Oh c'mon hpwatcher. The biggest factor in the house price boom, by far, was an excess of cheap money for mortgages and the bizarre tax advantages that property has compared to productive activity.

It provided a ready explanation - used by many - to justify why house prices will always rise....especially for the BTL'ers.

Sunday, November 8, 2009 07:55PM Report Comment
 

6. stillthinking said...

Without the influx of people inflation would have taken off during the housing bubble. Population expansion is a poor man's economic expansion (country gets richer, you remain sh*t poor as usual). I can remember Mervyn dumping the ONS in favour of his own secret measurements while complaining he couldn't make accurate predictions without even knowing how many people were in the country. Similar but different to Croyden Council (was it Croyden?) who pointed out that the money they received from government according to government population figures was insufficient to deal with the real number of people requiring services.
Immigration holds down inflation, which holds down perceptions of borrowing costs, which encourages over-indebtedness. There have been no real steps taken to reduce foreign labour in the UK although unemployment is on the up.

Sunday, November 8, 2009 08:05PM Report Comment
 

7. drewster said...

hpwatcher, quiet guy,

Surely we can agree that immigration had *some* impact on house prices?

Sunday, November 8, 2009 08:07PM Report Comment
 

8. quiet guy said...

@drewster, hpwatcher,

"Surely we can agree that immigration had *some* impact on house prices?"

Well OK but I did say "The biggest factor in the house price boom, by far ..." Out of curiosity, care to put a national average percentage on that? I'd guess around 10% or less. Of course, the effect has likely been highly localised to immigration hot spots.

Sunday, November 8, 2009 08:39PM Report Comment
 

9. hpwatcher said...

Well OK but I did say "The biggest factor in the house price boom, by far ..." Out of curiosity, care to put a national average percentage on that? I'd guess around 10% or less. Of course, the effect has likely been highly localised to immigration hot spots.

Yeah, there were several factors, some of which are included above.

Sunday, November 8, 2009 08:51PM Report Comment
 

10. drewster said...

I couldn't put a percentage on it, no. However it's a popular belief - I wonder whether the officials accused in this article may have had a vested interest in the property market?

Sunday, November 8, 2009 09:29PM Report Comment
 

11. a saver said...

Regarding relevance to HPC -is there anyone here who doesn't want to see Brown ousted on election day?
Although his credibility has already been shot to pieces.

Monday, November 9, 2009 07:55AM Report Comment
 

12. nickb said...

Looking forward to seeing Brown ousted but not looking forward to Cameron et al getting in. Anyone who thinks the tories are going to be one iota less home owner-ist than labour have been is deluding themselves. Maybe the greens? could they make a worse balls up?

Monday, November 9, 2009 09:12AM Report Comment
 

13. righttoleech said...

Tenants for the new administrations taxpayer funded BTL collections. Housing pressure to push up rental values. Rentals of economically inactive immigrants can be funded by Council Tax payers as neccessary.

Monday, November 9, 2009 09:49AM Report Comment
 

14. Quantum said...

Hi 'Quie tguy' could you elaborate on "..and the bizarre tax advantages that property has compared to productive activity." please? I've been trying to detail the reasons why BTL has a financial advantage over owner/occupiers and would be interested in your opininon, thanks.

Monday, November 9, 2009 11:38AM Report Comment
 

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