Friday, January 16, 2009

Ramp-it Times ahead

The 10 towns beating the housing slump - and the 10 worst affected

Complete dreams - especially if you know people in these so called top towns.

Posted by growler @ 08:46 AM (1314 views)
Please complete the required fields.



8 thoughts on “Ramp-it Times ahead

  • The Author of this report , Laura Whateley, should go and look for a new career. The data from a home.co.uk is totally irrelevant.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • Don’t let that ‘Merseyside’ tag attached to Hoylake and West Kirby fuel your preconceptions. These are traditionally very wealthy areas, (West Kirby having especially beautiful views out across the Dee estuary to the Welsh mountains) where many householders can afford to lose 30-40% off the ‘value’ of their homes without losing too much sleep.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • To summarise: north is falling, south isn’t. I can’t see that state of affairs holding for much longer.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • @4. Drewster: “To summarise: north is falling, south isn’t.”

    Simply isn’t true. I have first hand experience of prices in SW London and can assure you the ones that have sold have correlated almost exactly with the Nationwide’s UK Average.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • @growler,

    What? How is this ramping? It lists the good and the bad (relatively speaking) for time on market. Why don’t you calm down and use more appropriate language? In listing the “best” she is actually listing the “best of the worst”. Simple to understand, and anyone should get that.

    Oh, and I live in one of the towns in the first list and despite what I would like the situation to be, it *is* still a relatively healthy market. I know because I am monitoring the market very closely in the area as I have been saving to buy there for five years (I currently rent a noisy, flimsy wooden box otherwise known as an “executive apartment”). I’m hoping to finally get a house there later this year but prices are still quite resiliant to the crash that is affecting most of the rest of the UK. Trust me, I wish it were not true, but it is so I deal with that fact rather than deny it and dismiss is out of hand.

    Some people just cannot handle hearing or reading things which dare to contradict their own points of view – fact or opinion. Those sorts of people are usually ignored by the rest of adult society.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • @need-a-crash,

    I know – I was just summarising the article itself. Last May the Times published their opinion of the 10 most recession-proof counties, again all in the south.

    There’s a need to differentiate between London and the rest of the South. I suspect London will be worse affected than the home counties. Looking at New York City in the 1970s, a lot of people lost their well-paid jobs in the 1973 oil shock and the 1973-74 stock market crash. Faced with poor job prospects and rising crime rates they moved out to the suburbs and exurbs. This is a rational decision – the big city is a lot less fun if you can no longer afford the quality of life you’re used to. By the end of the 1970s the city’s population had declined by nearly one million.

    If the same happens in London, the home counties could do *relatively* well. Obviously house prices will still fall and unemployment and crime will still rise, but not as much as London.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • Pointless article in a newspaper desperate for headlines.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



Add a comment

  • Your email address is required so we can verify that the comment is genuine. It will not be posted anywhere on the site, will be stored confidentially by us and never given out to any third party.
  • Please note that any viewpoints published here as comments are user´s views and not the views of HousePriceCrash.co.uk.
  • Please adhere to the Guidelines

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>