Monday, December 22, 2008

Dear Bank of England, Resign. Yours Sincerely, The British People

Financial crisis: Bank of England 'did not understand problem'

Explaining why the Bank did not raise interest rates to curb the lending and house price boom, Gieve says: "If we'd used interest rates to try and address this asset-price credit growth, we would have been holding down the level of activity elsewhere in the economy, in manufacturing, in other services, holding down the level of employment at a time when consumer price inflation and earnings were stable and reasonably low. And people would have said, you know, 'this is a wilful reduction in the prosperity of the country'."

Posted by paul @ 10:13 AM (1492 views)
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13 thoughts on “Dear Bank of England, Resign. Yours Sincerely, The British People

  • Please excuse my ignorance.

    Why is the Bank of England named as such, if it sets the rates for the United Kingdom as a whole?

    Just wondering.

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  • Moneterism doesn’t work. End of story.

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  • ‘this is a wilful reduction in the prosperity of the country’.”

    BS. It would have been a wilful suppression of a bubble. If sheoples opinion is so much more important than educated fact, we may as well close the BoE and replace it with some kind of F-ing big brother type reality show. Idiots

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  • Wonderful Header. Made my day.

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  • This is why mortgage rates should be taken away from banks and handled by government/local authorties and building societies. Banks should be dealing with proper business and everyday accounts. This way BoE wouldn’t have to make silly excuses.

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  • Does this now make the BOE responsible for the losses incured as a consequence and therby liable to make good those losses suffered by the citizens of this country. I think this calls for a class action for a failure on the part of the BOE in it’s duty of care (with an admission by a panel member this should be an open and shut case). Comon open those vaults and compensate us all for your stupitidy and lack of action!

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  • little professor says:

    Deputy governor Sir John Gieve conceded that the Bank did not understand the dangers posed by the £1.4 trillion credit bubble that built up through soaring house prices and a consumer spending binge. He called for new controls on bank lending to stop “crazy borrowing” accumulating to such unstable levels, adding: “This is a major storm, the like of which we haven’t seen for 100 years, and I would be surprised if we weren’t learning some lessons from it and we are.”

    If only he had visited HPC.co.uk any time over the last four years, we could have told him.

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  • little professor says:

    It wasn’t a matter of not seeing the asset bubble, they saw it inflating and deliberately stood back and chose to let it happen, to create the illusion of wealth.

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  • Not only did that see it inflating and deliberately stood back, they were the ones with their foot on the pump.

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  • LP said: if only he had visted HPC.co.uk anytime over the last few years, we could have told him.

    I don’t think it would have made any difference, as over the last few years it was considered to be a professional suicide to not join in the chorus hailing the advent of a time of continuous growth that would never end. This was true in the media, government, and most it definitely applied if you were a BOE Deputy Governor.

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  • Very insightfull, didn’t we all know all this 4,5 & 5 years ago?

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  • I do not blame them there remit is not the same as the US they had a job> keep inflation under control and inflation was defined as CPI without housing costs (as people do not need that apparently). Omitting the largest expense a family has in unfortunately the real reason and that is the government.

    With house prices in there interest rates would have been higher and forced the government to do something to reduce the heat in the market. The HP boom was intended and was to get tax and cheap economic growth. Again the government a 20% deposit by law would have killed it stone dead.

    As for the banks again the government what the hell do the FSA do if they offer a guarantee they should know what they are guaranteeing?

    I actually respect the MPC they followed their remit and it looks like the spinning is working and people are starting to blame them rather than those responsible.

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  • 5. plato said…This is why mortgage rates should be taken away from banks and handled by government/local authorties and building societies. Banks should be dealing with proper business and everyday accounts. This way BoE wouldn’t have to make silly excuses.

    Monday, December 22, 2008 11:04AM

    troytroytroytroytroytroytroytroytroytroytroytroytroytroytroytroytroytroytroytroytroy

    we wouldn’t need mortgage rates if we didn’t have mortgages

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