Friday, August 1, 2008

Power of bad publicity.

Couple shame Bovis internet list dozens faults new £700,000 home

Family with a list of defects on a new build ending up having to use name-and-shame tactics to try and get Bovis to correct problems that shouldn't have been there in the first place.

Posted by aje @ 12:50 PM (1395 views)
Please complete the required fields.



12 thoughts on “Power of bad publicity.

  • Slightly related to that, see Wednesday’s story from Metro about the consequences of shoddy insulation in new-build homes….


    Metro: Police find the hot spot but not the pot
    Aerial shots taken from a helicopter revealed that the mother of five’s house was ‘pulsating’ with escaping heat. Cannabis is often grown under artificial lighting, which generates a similar trace. Cambridgeshire Police raided the house, thinking the infra-red hot spot signalled a secret cannabis farm. But the raid revealed a lack of insulation was behind the hot spot.
    Now the shock has turned to anger at the house builders. Mrs Huseyin and husband Steve said the raid showed their new £400,000 home in Cambourne, Cambridgeshire, was badly built.
    ‘These houses are meant to be environmentally friendly but last year’s gas bill was £1,000,’ she said.
    Her 46-year-old husband added: ‘The builders won’t admit there’s a problem but, if there’s nothing wrong, how come we’ve been raided by the police?’
    The home complied with all relevant standards, said developer David Wilson Homes.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • That’s hilarious. To be honest, I wouldn’t buy a house less than 10 years old. I’ve rented an ‘exclusive’ new townhouse before and the standard of finish was beyond a joke.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • Does anyone have a good idea how much a house like this actually costs to build. My guess it that it is somewhere in the region of £100,000 and £150,000.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • Hot Air producing and selling Hot Air………………….. for lots of money………………..of course.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • Landedgentry says:

    They’ll probably end up in a damp B&B in about 6 months anyway.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • “Mrs Huseyin and husband Steve said the raid showed their new £400,000 home in Cambourne, Cambridgeshire, was badly built. ”
    “Her 46-year-old husband added: ‘The builders won’t admit there’s a problem but, if there’s nothing wrong, how come we’ve been raided by the police?'”

    If there’s nothing wrong with my washing machine, then how come it rains every time I put my washing out?

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • Whostolemyendowment says:

    Looked up there website – think this is the one, guess they’ve now had a settlement if they close out the website http://www.whybovishomes.co.uk/

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • @shipbuilder,

    Agreed, something is rotten in the state of British housebuilding. I’ve lived in BTL new-build apartments, all the same issues. With the BTL apartments it’s slightly different as there’s much less quality control – investors/suckers would buy anything as long as it was dressed up in the right keywords (“exclusive”, “executive”, “luxury”, …). With proper new-build homes though, I fail to understand how the new buyers could have missed all these faults. Don’t people have to get a survey done when they buy a house? Or does that not apply to new-builds, do they just foolishly trust the builders?!

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • The banner from the picture in the story points to their website … http://www.whybovishomes.co.uk/. But when you visit it, the home page states that an agreement has been reached as of 30/07/2008.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • “Does anyone have a good idea how much a house like this actually costs to build”

    That depends on several factors; the standard of finish affects price considerably, the cost of road and service provision can vary dramatically, and if the site has been previously developed you can get caught with all sorts of clean-up costs. Then there’s the architectural, engineering and quantity surveying fees if the house is a one-off.

    There’s also an economy of scale – if you take a compact house design, and then re-work it so you have the same number of rooms, but twice the floor area, your build cost only rises by about 50% (or less).

    However, on average, you can build a family house for around £40k if you keep your costs under control, and you can build something pretty special for £100k

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • Well hopefully nowadays if you did actually want to buy you would have plenty of time to prepare a snagging list. In the boom times by the time you did this someone else would have bought the property and so they would have been hoolding the snags!

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • Uncle
    Thats Very and i mean Very unlikely, for a new build 3 bed house with the excavations to current build regulation expect the foundations to cost 40K ( i know i have done it ), current build costs above ground are about £700 a square metre if you do all the fitting ( thats £700 per square metre floor area per story naturally ) for the shell.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



Add a comment

  • Your email address is required so we can verify that the comment is genuine. It will not be posted anywhere on the site, will be stored confidentially by us and never given out to any third party.
  • Please note that any viewpoints published here as comments are user´s views and not the views of HousePriceCrash.co.uk.
  • Please adhere to the Guidelines

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>