Monday, March 10, 2008

But you do still need the land, and planning permission

How to build a house for £4,000

A £24m funding package was put together earlier this year to help first-time buyers in Scotland get a foot on the property ladder. But just how much would they have to spend to build their own home? The answer could be as little as £4,000. That is the estimated price tag attached to a property which has been built in southern Scotland over the past four years.

Posted by sacred contracts @ 01:32 PM (850 views)
Please complete the required fields.



11 thoughts on “But you do still need the land, and planning permission

  • apart from go to ikea or visit secondlife?

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • An Bearin Bui says:

    It’s a good article to highlight just how ridiculous planning laws are and how much they contribute to the high price of housing. If more self-build plots were released for people to build their own homes then this would be hugely effective in bringing down the cost of housing. With self-build projects you will get quite diverse buildings that will not always suit the average taste but on the upside you will also get high-quality homes for less money as no-one is going to build a shoddy shoebox to live in for themselves. The problem with Barratt et al is that those designing and financing such developments will never have to live in them so will approve the cheapest materials and poorest standard of workmanship.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • Walls made of straw, eh? Well, little piggy wig, I’ll huff and I’ll puff and…

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • rule of thumb of housebuilding economics:

    1/3 cost of land
    1/3 building costs
    1/3 profits before marketing costs and overheads

    anything else is fantasy

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • it_is_going_with_a_bang says:

    You would have to pay me £4000 to live in that.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • That house would fail many building regulations. There are rules about wall thickness, heat insulation, sound-proofing, ventilation, hygiene, drainage, waste disposal, electrics, windows, etc etc. All these regulations discourage small-time builders and serve to protect the large house builders (Bovis & friends).

    In this example, the “house” is probably classified as either a garden shed or a summer-house, both of which are exempt. Alternatively the rules might just be different in Scotland.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • > Walls made of straw, eh? Well, little piggy wig, I’ll huff and I’ll puff and…

    straw is an excellent insulator.

    I’ve built my own house (now sold but still standing 😉 out of traditional materials… you know bricks ‘n’ mortar – it is an expensive business. You’ve have to be very innovative to do it for £4000,

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • Tastingstars says:

    Simple economics will kick in as well – if everyone were to start doing this then demand would go up and the value of the scrap used would rise. Exactly the same thing is happening with people recycling waste chip fat to use in their cars – as demand is rising, it is becoming a sought-after commodity and it has moved from something one pays to dispose of into one with economic value. And the taxman is taking an interest too.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • As a reply to drewster’s comments
    “That house would fail many building regulations. There are rules about wall thickness, heat insulation, sound-proofing, ventilation, hygiene, drainage, waste disposal, electrics, windows, etc”

    I am an architect and have designed straw bale buildings before, and although not to the same degree of self building, they all passed building regulations. I only point this out because I support alternative house design and dont want it disparaged by a lack of accurate information

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • Back in 1996 you could buy a Brand New two bedroom Crest house in New Milton, Hampshire for about £55000.
    Given that wages haven’t been going up by much and there has been a huge influx of Polish plumbers etc what
    I would like to know is how much (excluding the land) the same houses cost to build now.

    :- Duncan

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



Add a comment

  • Your email address is required so we can verify that the comment is genuine. It will not be posted anywhere on the site, will be stored confidentially by us and never given out to any third party.
  • Please note that any viewpoints published here as comments are user´s views and not the views of HousePriceCrash.co.uk.
  • Please adhere to the Guidelines

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>