Wednesday, February 14, 2007

Suffer little children

UK bottom of assessment on childrens wellbeing -- UNICEF

The UK has been ranked bottom in an assessment of child wellbeing across 21 industrialised countries, UNICEF said Wednesday. The report said the UK lags behind in terms of relative poverty and deprivation, the quality of children's relationships with their parents and peers, child health and safety, behaviour and risk-taking, and young people's own sense of wellbeing.

Posted by converted lurker @ 11:01 AM (533 views)
Please complete the required fields.



13 thoughts on “Suffer little children

  • dohousescrashinthewoods says:

    I heard this on Radio 4 last night and thought it was a very sad assessment of our nation.
    Children are, after all, tomorrow’s leaders.
    Add in the OECD’s comments about British infrastructure, etc. and you get a pretty bleak picture.
    No wonder the natives are leaving in droves and people here (including me) are posting unhappy thoughts about life in the UK and plans to leave.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • The UK is not a very nice place to live, it is very expensive and when road tolls come in it is only going to get worse.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • tyrellcorporation says:

    I have a second nipper on the way and the thought of both of them having to literally fight their way through the UKs crappy education system fills me with dread.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • From a similar report elsewhere in today’s media

    “The scathing report by the UN children’s fund, Unicef, says youngsters are better off overall in every other industrialised country, including less wealthy nations such as Poland and the Czech Republic. According to today’s report, the UK lags in other areas too such as the number of children living in relative poverty, vaccination rates, and the time spent talking, or eating with a parent or parents.

    It also has high rates of obesity, drunkenness, bullying, early sexual intercourse, cannabis-taking and teenage pregnancy.”

    In other words something is seriously wrong in this country. They were banging on about this on the BBC TV news this morning saying “how terrible all this is, how awful etc ? And we are a wealthy nation as well”. Perhaps this at the heart of the problem. Is the nation really that wealthy? I thought that the country is basically bankrupt taking into account it’s future liabilities pensions etc. The list is endless. If the BBC can’t even get to grips with the fundamentals what hope is there? Presumably they are talking about housing wealth contributing to the wealth but is this really wealth or just fictitious wealth unless you sell your house. In any case high house prices just push the standard of living down for most people unless you sleep in a field. Sad to say it but things did seem alot lot better here 10 years ago inspite of 18 years of underinvestment by the previous lot.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • I live in Bath it’s not exactly the worst place in the world to live but my next door neighbour who’s a pensioner and nearly blind has had a bogus caller rob her once then came back and tried again, she’s now frightened to leave the house for fear of being mugged. What’s it going to be like in twenty years for pensioners I certainly don’t intend finding out.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • soviet uk – my thoughts exactly. If indeed we are the 4th richest nation, why do we come bottom of just about every league table that’s ever published? We must be mightily incompetent if so.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • In other EU Countries for example Germany, the government encourages and financially supports the family to look after their children for the first three years. The employer also keeps their post open for the same time. The kids start school at age 6 and the school day finishes at lunch time (even when their are teenagers). It is very common that one parent stays at home or works on a part time basis to be able to look after their kids after school. I think what I am trying to say is that maybe the bond between parents and children is more established and they have spent so much more time with each other. That has to be a good thing and might be the reason why the UK came last in the UNICEF report.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • Cyril

    Take out the cost of first properties – and then see if we are the 4th richest nation. Bet we are not. It is the property hype again.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • I was listening to this debate on LBC this morning. Apparently the definition for living below the Poverty line was for a family living on £250 per week after housing expenses. Am I the only one here who thinks that £1000 per month is hardly poverty line!

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • Can’t help but wonder what will happen to todays 20 somethings buying their first grossly overpriced property, in all probability a small flat on a new development when they try to move to a proper house to raise a family burdened by large borrowings, no job security and poor pension prospects. I can see that things will get a lot lot worse here before they stand any chance of getting better.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • The Capitalist says:

    Someone said (a Roman or Greek chap) “laws without morality are meaningless”

    And so fast forward to UK in 2007 – a culture of all our ills is seen as a “government” problem to sort out. This is fostered of course by the welfare/dependency state. But really it is us as adults to set an example to future parents and leaders. In Africa they say it takes a whole village to raise a child…

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • dohousescrashinthewoods says:

    ..and the systemic fragmentation, disintegration and individual-focus of our accepted way of thinking stands contrary to this.

    I have been thinking of society like a piece of fabric. If there are a few broken threads, or missed links here and there, it can still hold together, but if these become the norm, then you are left with bits of threads and the odd remaining fraying patch.

    Conclusion? Invest in building a society that values people and relationships. A good (but not stellar) economy will follow. Go after a stellar economy at the expense of these and you pretty soon have nothing left. Sound familiar?

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



  • the Uk stinks – time to get out if you can. I would not bring kids up here unless i could pay private education, private health and the rest. This country has become a shambles.

    Reply
    Please complete the required fields.



Add a comment

  • Your email address is required so we can verify that the comment is genuine. It will not be posted anywhere on the site, will be stored confidentially by us and never given out to any third party.
  • Please note that any viewpoints published here as comments are user´s views and not the views of HousePriceCrash.co.uk.
  • Please adhere to the Guidelines

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>