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I would totally recommend Brno in the Czech Republic....

I have posted in detail on here before about reasons....

You do not need a car - so you can sell those, you can rent a nice appartment for 2-300 pounds in a new block. You can eat a 2 course meal in a restaurant for 2.50 pounds and get unlimited travel day and night on trains, trams, busses and trolley buses for 10 pounds a month. If you can realise 100k you would unlikely eat much capital even if you sat on your **** and enjoyed all the free festivals, fireworks displays, country side etc.

Night life is great and Beer is 30pence for half litre - and it is czech beer.

There are a number of multinationals expanding there such as IBM, Infosys etc.... and there are 6 univesities teaching many courses in English - so you could just hang out and learn something.

From Next May, you will only have to ask to then be allowed to buy a property there - in the countryside, you can still find a self sufficient type property for under 50k.

Here is a typical property that would cost you 67k (last week 62k) - That is for 100% ownership

http://www.rksting.cz/cs/detail/BR080200738/

Here is a new appartment for rent for around 360 pounds (Last week nearer 300) +bills

http://www.rksting.cz/cs/detail/BR081200899/

There are lots of second hand funiture shops where you can pick up the basics for a song.

The czech have a culture of only buy what you can afford - indeed outside of Prague you can't pay for things with cards in many places still. The younger generation were being converted to a debt culture, but the Crash has saved them the same fate as the west and the rest of eastern europe (including Slovakia).

The language is an issue, most people over a certain age, just speak czech - but block buster films are often in English at the great cinemas and with a little effort you can get buy.

Internet is cheap - Even if you want 25MB/second with 32ms ping. Also council tax on my 120m2 appartment was a massive 30 pounds a year!!!

It does get cold in the winter - but it is proper cold - with snow and stuff - and they are used to it. You can ski there! summers are long and glorious with fine al-fresco dining.

Vienna is 2 hours away, as is Prague, Bratislava 1.5 hours away.

Airport is a 15min 50pence bus ride from town centre with daily Ryanair flights to stanstead...... Just booked some in march, for me, My wife and our infant - for around 120 - babycost half that.

Easy to set up a bank account there which can hold multiple currencies and with great on-line facilities.

I Love it - and can't wait to get back there!

3DBob

Edited by 3DBob
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I've lived overseas for 18 of the last 20 years. USA, Middle East, Australia.

I worked harder, and made more money, overseas. I paid less taxes overseas (except Australia, the taxes there are horrific, but the lifestyles good)

I played harder, had more toys, and had more fun overseas.

The weathers better overseas.

But there also comes a time when it's just time to move home. Theres nothing sadder than the old has-been expats reliving the glory days and fighting the inevitable income decline that comes with being out of touch in most of those markets.

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Theres nothing sadder than the old has-been expats reliving the glory days and fighting the inevitable income decline that comes with being out of touch in most of those markets.

I am not understanding why you are describing places as markets. Is this because of your job? In which case, why generalise?

I think the weak pound, the weak economy, the cultural poverty, and the total lack of public transport is about to show us what 'out of touch' really means. It's hard to get any work done here, because things are so often broken that most people don't even realise they're broken at all.

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Nope, self-employed in as an IT consultant. Only working 3 days a week (through choice) since the age of 27, never involved in any property development stuff. Far too lazy.

I just don't recognise the vision of the country I live in being portrayed lately on this site.

When I think of my friends I don't see people living vastly beyond their means I just see normal, nice people.

If I look around the area I live in I don't see vile, repelent, chavs. I see young couples with babies, families with a few older kids, pensioners going to the shops. When I go onto my sites I see normal people going about normal life.

lol, your obviously on drugs.

What I see is, er...... dang I keep trying to tone down my French, its er, 'orrible.

So,,, er, you dont see rich people being drip fed the life force of the poor? you dont see children lying torn and tortured in a dying wasteland of dispair?

oooh, i feel a song coming on

Across the hills, black clouds are sweeping

Carry poison far and wide

And the grass has blackened underfoot

And the rose has withered and died

But the rose is still as red love

And the grass is still as green

And it must have been a shadow in the distance you have seen

Yes it must have been a shadow you have seen

But can't you hear the children weeping?

Can't you hear the mournful sound?

And no birds sing in the twisted trees

In the silent streets around

I can hear the children laughing

In the streets as they play

And you must have caught the dying of an echo far away

Yes it must have been an echo far away

But can't you see the white ash falling?

From the hollow of the skies?

And the blood runs red down the blackened walls

Where a ruined city lies

I can see the red sun shining

In the park on the stream

And you must have felt a shiver from the darkness of a dream

Yes it must have been the darkness of a dream

But the rose is still as red, love

And the grass is still as green

And it must have been a shadow you have seen

But the rose is still as red, love

And the grass is still as green

And it must have been a shadow you have seen

And death shall reap a hellish harvest

Make a desert of this land

And it must have been a shadow you have seen

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Did I mention, a mass inability to use the native language which is quite unusual by global standards?

All of which begs the question while you're telling others to 'travel a bit', what's your frame of comparison? Compared to where does the UK really look like the hetero white middle-class wonderland of your description?

Or, having brought it up yourself, do you not now accept that I do have the perspective to make these judgments?

Did I makes a speling mstake on an interent froum? call teh ploice!?

I've no doubt if you move overseas, work in a well paid job and socialise with ex-pats and friendly, welcoming locals it is great. You are hardly open cast mining with the locals in Bolivia.

I've travelled all over the world, a lot of Asia , spent time living and working in Australia and New Zealand, a month travelling around Africa, several trips to North America and go to Europe at least twice a year.

There are lovely aspects to all these places and I certainly wouldn't rule out living and working overseas again.

In England I've lived in Kent, the Midlands and currently in Cambridge. I like living here as do my friends from Germany, France, Denmark, New Zealand etc who have settled here after finishing their education.

I apologise for liking where I live and getting on with it rather than blaming my country for not being happy.

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While I agree that the UK has it's bad points, I'm not sure that it's quite the hellhole that some posters are making it out to be! :)

I'm more concerned about the looming tax rises on the horizon. I've got a fair idea of the financial position that the UK is now in and whatever measures are taken to resolve the situation are going to be nasty for anyone with a job (like me, for example). I'd like to avoid getting caught up in it all if I can and short of going on the dole, heading abroad seems like a good plan.

Nobody's really mentioned Canada yet in this thread. How's that as a potential place to work in? I work in manufacturing and am currently studying towards a full engineering degree, so I reckon some employer out there would have me. Any comments/ suggestions?

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I've travelled all over the world, a lot of Asia , spent time living and working in Australia and New Zealand, a month travelling around Africa, several trips to North America and go to Europe at least twice a year.

So you've had a gap year. Whoop-di-fukn-doo.

'Several trips'. Are you hearing yourself here?

It was you who brought up the 'you should travel a bit'. But you basically haven't, have you?

Did I makes a speling mstake on an interent froum? call teh ploice!?

Those are typos dipsh1t, not spelling errors.

Why don't you get one of those jpgs that talk about spelling nazis? Just in case you've failed to hit this extremely wide target?

The point being, if you have lived outside the UK longterm, which you haven't, the literacy problems are one of the things that are very noticeable. And they are central to culture, to the way we conceive of ourselves. And every time, every single time, you see someone banging on about how great the UK is, how we should shut up and love 'our' culture, the people who are arguing for that culture inevitably have a ropey grasp of the language themselves. Check the BNP website.

And you need to fix that habit of telling people about their own lives - 'well you were living amongst friendly natives, you weren't tin mining...' You have no idea what I was doing. An hour ago you were sure I'd never travelled.

And listen, just because you don't see inequality in your part of Cambridge, does NOT make the UK a Brownian paradise.

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While I agree that the UK has it's bad points, I'm not sure that it's quite the hellhole that some posters are making it out to be! :)

I'm more concerned about the looming tax rises on the horizon. I've got a fair idea of the financial position that the UK is now in and whatever measures are taken to resolve the situation are going to be nasty for anyone with a job (like me, for example). I'd like to avoid getting caught up in it all if I can and short of going on the dole, heading abroad seems like a good plan.

Nobody's really mentioned Canada yet in this thread. How's that as a potential place to work in? I work in manufacturing and am currently studying towards a full engineering degree, so I reckon some employer out there would have me. Any comments/ suggestions?

depends where you live, you move farther north and it is a hell hole, places like bolton with 25% unemployment, bury about the same,

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So you've had a gap year. Whoop-di-fukn-doo.

'Several trips'. Are you hearing yourself here?

It was you who brought up the 'you should travel a bit'. But you basically haven't, have you?

Those are typos dipsh1t, not spelling errors.

Why don't you get one of those jpgs that talk about spelling nazis? Just in case you've failed to hit this extremely wide target?

The point being, if you have lived outside the UK longterm, which you haven't, the literacy problems are one of the things that are very noticeable. And they are central to culture, to the way we conceive of ourselves. And every time, every single time, you see someone banging on about how great the UK is, how we should shut up and love 'our' culture, the people who are arguing for that culture inevitably have a ropey grasp of the language themselves. Check the BNP website.

And you need to fix that habit of telling people about their own lives - 'well you were living amongst friendly natives, you weren't tin mining...' You have no idea what I was doing. An hour ago you were sure I'd never travelled.

And listen, just because you don't see inequality in your part of Cambridge, does NOT make the UK a Brownian paradise.

Brill!!! :lol:

Timak seems to be taking the place of Sibley - we should ask him what he thinks about the economy/House prices....... errr...... then again maybe not.

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Obviously we all have different experiences of the uk depending on where we live and our lifestyle and income/wealth/job etc. Which begs the question, if you're not living in a place you like, don't look abroad yet, why not look at nicer places in the uk first. HPC will make these places more affordable, see what's out there. Every country has problems, and good and bad areas to live. The one thing you will lose if you emigrate is that you'll be living in a place where you are not from. There's nothing you can do about that, and for me it would colour a lot of the experience. You'll always be seen by the natives as an outsider, you'll have no roots.

Look before you leap. And consider stepping instead.

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The prob with emigrating at this point, is the purchasing power of the pound is now pretty poor.

That said, Brazil has more or less stayed the same wrt weakness/strength vs the pound.

An up & coming country (days of hyperinflation are long past), cheap property, beautiful weather, culture, beaches, caiparinhas, music ....oh yeah, & the best babes in the world. (& they keep their fuzz in order)

Edited by shakenvac
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So you've had a gap year. Whoop-di-fukn-doo.

'Several trips'. Are you hearing yourself here?

It was you who brought up the 'you should travel a bit'. But you basically haven't, have you?

Those are typos dipsh1t, not spelling errors.

Why don't you get one of those jpgs that talk about spelling nazis? Just in case you've failed to hit this extremely wide target?

The point being, if you have lived outside the UK longterm, which you haven't, the literacy problems are one of the things that are very noticeable. And they are central to culture, to the way we conceive of ourselves. And every time, every single time, you see someone banging on about how great the UK is, how we should shut up and love 'our' culture, the people who are arguing for that culture inevitably have a ropey grasp of the language themselves. Check the BNP website.

And you need to fix that habit of telling people about their own lives - 'well you were living amongst friendly natives, you weren't tin mining...' You have no idea what I was doing. An hour ago you were sure I'd never travelled.

And listen, just because you don't see inequality in your part of Cambridge, does NOT make the UK a Brownian paradise.

Why the anger?

I started off by saying people who constantly go on and on about how awful everything is here should travel a bit. They should talk to people of similar ages in other countries and see what opportunities they have in life. You'll find by the very fact you can afford to go there and get paid holiday you are already better off than 90% of people on this planet.

I can't see that anybody could disagree with that.

I have travelled, I've probably spent about 18 months of the last 8 years outside of Europe in a variety of places. I do this by saving up leave and going away for 6 weeks at a time, or by taking career breaks. I've had 2 so far. Again this simply wouldn't be an option for most of the worlds population but the fact I was lucky enough to be born British means the world is my oyster. Heck, I could even go and live in Japan if I wanted.

I see lots of inequality in Cambridge, but I also see a safety net in place for the poorest people and unlimited opportunity for people to do what they want with their lives. This simply doesn't exist in most of the rest of the world.

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I lived in Holland for 5 years, great place.

It's hard to learn Dutch as being multilingual is a point of national pride, you walk into a shop or start a conversation and get replies back in perfect english.

Take some marmite and brown sauce with you it's impossible to get over there and get used to cycling everywhere. The Some dutch also eat vla (cold, flavoured custard) for breakfast, with chocolate sprinkles on top and serve chips smothered in mayonnaise.

I had that yesterday, but in reverse order since it was my evening meal. :rolleyes:

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Brill!!! :lol:

Timak seems to be taking the place of Sibley - we should ask him what he thinks about the economy/House prices....... errr...... then again maybe not.

Err I found this site because I thought there was a dangerous housing bubble in the economy and was worried about the huge levels of debt people seemed to be taking on.

I think "we" are in for a very tough financial time but that doesn't follow that I have to express hatred for everything to do with life in Britain. Any country where you can sit at home in your pants ramping Gold on internet forums all day is surely not one that need worry about putting food on the table.

I haven't STR'd because I like my house and renting would be more expensive than my mortgage. I appreciate my equity is now minimal but the house is big enough to raise a family in when the time comes.

I'd better run now....the sky seems to be falling.

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Why the anger?

I started off by saying people who constantly go on and on about how awful everything is here should travel a bit. They should talk to people of similar ages in other countries and see what opportunities they have in life. You'll find by the very fact you can afford to go there and get paid holiday you are already better off than 90% of people on this planet.

Wow thats a bit of a straw man argument isn't it? , in that people are not comparing every country in the world vs the UK,

compare zimbabwe or North Korea to the UK and of course the UK comes out on top...

In that you are not comparing like for like ie 1st world industrialised country....and the the only fair comparisoms you can really make are:

Western/northern Europe.

Singapore

Hong Kong

Macau

Taiwan

Japan

S Korea

US

Ireland

Canada

Aus

NZ

And thus out of the 195 countries in the world the UK is going to remain in the top 30 at the very least and thus your comparisom is unfair.

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Wow thats a bit of a straw man argument isn't it? , in that people are not comparing every country in the world vs the UK,

compare zimbabwe or North Korea to the UK and of course the UK comes out on top...

In that you are not comparing like for like ie 1st world industrialised country....and the the only fair comparisoms you can really make are:

Western/northern Europe.

Singapore

Hong Kong

Macau

Taiwan

Japan

S Korea

US

Ireland

Canada

Aus

NZ

And thus out of the 195 countries in the world the UK is going to remain in the top 30 at the very least and thus your comparisom is unfair.

I'm not trying to prove anything really, I just simply like living in Britain and don't regard my fellow citizens as scum.

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Err I found this site because I thought there was a dangerous housing bubble in the economy and was worried about the huge levels of debt people seemed to be taking on.

I think "we" are in for a very tough financial time but that doesn't follow that I have to express hatred for everything to do with life in Britain. Any country where you can sit at home in your pants ramping Gold on internet forums all day is surely not one that need worry about putting food on the table.

I haven't STR'd because I like my house and renting would be more expensive than my mortgage. I appreciate my equity is now minimal but the house is big enough to raise a family in when the time comes.

I'd better run now....the sky seems to be falling.

You are mistaken and quite unable to understand what is being said in these posts.

Comprehension 2/10 - go back to school!

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nice one shakenvac!!!

i back up your comments an add what charm they have . life a bit more "lived"and to be enjoyed,im sure thats partly climatic. i took the family for a first visit(ive been many times before) they loved it,lost my wallet on the sugar loaf cable car though!!!

tudo bein!! chow ,obrigado!

So have you bought in Brazil? (I've been there 6 times)

I nearly bought a waterfront rock star-esque house complete with huge motorboat three years ago...for just £185,000 - I'm kicking myself that I didn't. I've 'missed my chance now, as the currency was 5 to £1 then, now it's about 3.3 to £1, therefore about 35% more expensive plus their HPI which is probably about 10=15%pa, so it's probably be about £400,000 now :-(

By the way it's Tudo Bem & Tchau!

Edited by shakenvac
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Wouldn't worry too much - the Dutch are masters in building sea walls.

Seriously though, I have wondered about emigrating to the Netherlands myself - it looks a pretty nice country, and fairly liberal too, which is always good.

I know nothing about the taxation though. Is it really that bad?

I understand from a Dutch acquaintance that they're quite worried ... he reckoned they'd all end up living in Germany or around Arnhem :ph34r:

Check this out for Dutch taxation. As a foreigner you should pay special attention to the 30% rule (used to be the 35% rule when I worked there, but I didn't qualify due to the way I was recruited ... if I'd known in advance I'd have done it differently).

Taxation is high but not as bad as it used to be, I was on a marginal rate of 89% in the 1980s :o and being under 26 didn't help, they taxed the young more highly, don't know if that's still the case.

Also someone from the sickness-insurance company was liable to come round to your place if you called in sick, to make sure you weren't skiving.

A very easy and comfortable place to live/work though.

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I started off by saying people who constantly go on and on about how awful everything is here should travel a bit. They should talk to people of similar ages in other countries and see what opportunities they have in life. You'll find by the very fact you can afford to go there and get paid holiday you are already better off than 90% of people on this planet.

Having "traveled a bit", I found it brought Britain's problems into sharp perspective, it spurned me on to get out - at least for a while. Its easy to 'just put up with it' in the UK, become blind to the vast social, economic and political problems. Sure, you can make yourself feel better by saying you are better off than some others, but when compared to other developed nations Britain is not in high standing.

Britain has a nasty little authoritarian government, crime is a daily experience("no its not" you yell - but those burned out cars, graffiti, that fly tipping, smashed in shop windows on Sunday morning and Saturday evening brawls - thats all crime and it is a part of the British experience), the weather is awful, the streets are dirty, the benefits culture is rife, the traffic is terrible, local government is spiteful and invasive, the cost of living is crippling, the taxation is painful and house prices are ridiculous.

If you want to just grin and bare it in the UK thats fine, the world has a lot more to offer.

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You are mistaken and quite unable to understand what is being said in these posts.

Comprehension 2/10 - go back to school!

I bow to your superior knowledge.

How much better would this country be if only everyone spent all day ramping Gold on the internet and moaning about the Government?

Edited by Timak
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