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Guest happy?

You can chose between the following:

1. No ZanuLabour have put paid to democracy.

2. Yes, but only if you vote "Yes" as ZanuLabour have put paid to democracy.

3. Yes, but whichever way you vote we're going in as ZanuLabour have put paid to democracy.

Alternatively, some might suggest that the faultlines in the Euro are getting stronger and will the party have ended before we've been to the offy to get a bottle of thunderbird wine.

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It's hard to imagine that there wouldn't be a vote. There are lots of people with a great emotional tie to the pound. Hanging on to it would have to be shown to be pretty dire before many people would agree to dump it.

p

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It's hard to imagine that there wouldn't be a vote. There are lots of people with a great emotional tie to the pound. Hanging on to it would have to be shown to be pretty dire before many people would agree to dump it.

p

I agree - Gordon is doing a fine job of making the Pound pretty dire in preparation for joining the Euro.

HAL

Edited to say that you think just like a NuLabour troll.

Edited by IMHAL

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Could the Eurozone really sustain another basket-case economy?

Would we get a vote? Only when the economy has been destroyed to such a degree that there seems to be no other solution.

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Could the Eurozone really sustain another basket-case economy?

Would we get a vote? Only when the economy has been destroyed to such a degree that there seems to be no other solution.

If there's going to be no other solution why so much complaining about it?

Me I've always thought we should be in. Its the Daily Mail 'can't live without my traditional words for everything' folk who will sulk. Mind you if they were offered the return of ounces they might be happy. Swap one pound for 16 ounces.

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Probably not. Have a look at the BBC News version of the story: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7757830.stm

As far as Barroso is concerned, a referendum would matter little:

"I know that the majority in Britain are still opposed, but there is a period of consideration under way and the people who matter in Britain are currently thinking about it", he said.

The "people who matter" obviously do not include the "majority".

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The Nation voted for the EU, and for the current labour government, so what is there to vote on. Of course the majority of the public wish to join the Euro, what would the point of voting labour be for ?

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Britain is considering joining the eurozone as a direct consequence of global financial turmoil, European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso said Sunday.

Well, he has no axe to grind, does he? ;) Could it be possible, I wonder, that the 'some politicians' who have been saying, "If we had the euro, we would have been better off" to him, were already pro-euro?

Either way, events in Ireland should give us some clues about whether the statement of those politicians is correct. Let's watch and learn.

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If there's going to be no other solution why so much complaining about it?

Me I've always thought we should be in. Its the Daily Mail 'can't live without my traditional words for everything' folk who will sulk. Mind you if they were offered the return of ounces they might be happy. Swap one pound for 16 ounces.

There is another solution, sound money. The Euro will be presented as the only solution.

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We'll have to get a vote, however the question will be so loaded as to make the vote meaningless as you will only be able to choose YES. This will be guaranteed by putting a tiny NO box inside the yes box so when you vote no in fact you'll be voting YES.

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Great news, I hope the UK joins soon! Our aerospace parts business both buys from and sells to Euro countries, and the volatility of the exchange rate causes a lot of problems for us. I am also fed up with ever rising costs every time I go to Austria or Spain on vacation. As most of my family is from Austria, and as we want to escape the English weather to Spain every now and then not going is not really an option. So bring it on - dump the pound sooner rather than later. I think the current exchange rate of 1.2 is about right after the exchange rate was too high for many years. Even the interest rates are currently almost the same. Many reasons why the UK should join now.

And no - there should be no vote, the British public is biased against the European Union and the Euro because of influential rubbish media like The Sun. After all, the government also does not allow votes on important (but unpopular) issues like "Do you want to pay taxes or would you rather keep all of your salary for yourself"? And I cannot remember there was a vote on the unpopular Iraq war which already cost numerous lives and billions of pounds.

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The Nation voted for the EU, and for the current labour government, so what is there to vote on. Of course the majority of the public wish to join the Euro, what would the point of voting labour be for ?

Indeed. <_<

But people voited for NuLabour. What we have now is New-Labour. Nothing like we have seen before. Nothing we would have dreamed would have been foisted on us without a popular vote.

1 GBP = $ 1.51948 Euro: 1.19968

Up vs. Euro, down vs. $. IMO the Euro is about to drop heavily.

Edited by Realistbear

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Agreed

And why do I see the Euro as being vulnerable to the next big sell off?

Here it is:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/comment...to-unravel.html

World stability hangs by a thread as economies continue to unravel
The political bubble is bursting. Spreads on geo-strategic risk are now widening as dramatically as the spreads on financial risk at the onset of the credit crunch.
...../
As for Europe, it is already fragile. Iceland, Hungary, Ukraine, Belarus, Latvia, and Serbia have turned to the IMF. Russia is a hostage to oil prices. If Urals oil stays below $50 a barrel for long, we are going to see an earthquake of one kind or another.
It is too early in this crisis to conclude whether Europe's monetary union is a source stability, or is itself a doomsday machine. The rift between North and South is growing. The spreads on Greek, Irish, Italian, Austrian, and Belgian debt remain stubbornly high. The lack of a unified EU treasury has become glaringly clear. Germany has refused to underpin the system with a fiscal blitz.

I have long held that the imbalances in the EZ will be the Euro's undoing. IMO, sterling is a safer bet than the Euro at this stage of the economic collapse. Flight to US $ is not over--the BRIC countries are teetering and China will not survive in its present form as it is too dependent on what Brown was too dependent on--a continuous boom without a bust.

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Indeed. <_<

But people voited for NuLabour. What we have now is New-Labour. Nothing like we have seen before. Nothing we would have dreamed would have been foisted on us without a popular vote.

1 GBP = $ 1.51948 Euro: 1.19968

Up vs. Euro, down vs. $. IMO the Euro is about to drop heavily.

Eh? Pound's down against both today, by over a cent against the euro. Since I have to exchange another couple of thousand euros for sterling this week, I'm watching the rate carefully. Of course, if the UK had the euro, I wouldn't have this hassle; I pay, on average, about a tenner a month for the UK to stay outside the euro. :angry:

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It is too early in this crisis to conclude whether Europe's monetary union is a source stability, or is itself a doomsday machine. The rift between North and South is growing. The spreads on Greek, Irish, Italian, Austrian, and Belgian debt remain stubbornly high. The lack of a unified EU treasury has become glaringly clear. Germany has refused to underpin the system with a fiscal blitz. [/indent]

I have long held that the imbalances in the EZ will be the Euro's undoing. IMO, sterling is a safer bet than the Euro at this stage of the economic collapse. Flight to US $ is not over--the BRIC countries are teetering and China will not survive in its present form as it is too dependent on what Brown was too dependent on--a continuous boom without a bust.

I've been making similar points for a while on this forum - but I disagree with Ambrose EP's view that the Euro will not survive.

There is simply too much at stake politically for it to happen.

What will happen is a severe correction from the Euro's recent highs.

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I've been making similar points for a while on this forum - but I disagree with Ambrose EP's view that the Euro will not survive.

There is simply too much at stake politically for it to happen.

What will happen is a severe correction from the Euro's recent highs.

Sterling down by around 25% vs the $ so perhaps the Euyro has a similar amount to fall from its peak of around 1.60 down to 1.20. However, it is almost there today having dropped to a recent near record low of:

1.26458

THe flight from China and India is boosting the $ again today but it seems to be hurting the Euro more than it is sterling which is still holding above recent record lows (well into the mid 1.40s):

1 GBP = $1.51190

IMO we are seeing a trendn lower for the EUro and higher for Sterling relative to it.

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As someone with the vast majority of their savings in sterling, but living/working in France and mainly paid in sterling, the exchange rate isn't doing me too many favours. I also receive some payment in dollars and euros, so am building up savings in several currencies. I couldn't exchange my sterling when the going was good as it was tied up in long-term investments (fortunately no risk ones).

I can't decide what I'd like as the outcome. It's several years before I need to contemplate buying another house, and have an apartment in Paris I can rent out come that time, but I would like my sterling savings to use as a larger deposit. If the euro plummets and the pound gains momentum in the next 3-4 years, this would work well for me, but if the UK switches to the euro in the shorter-term at least the decision will be made and out of my hands. Shame about the exchange rate, but it's already costing me now so I can't really win whatever happens.

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I've been making similar points for a while on this forum - but I disagree with Ambrose EP's view that the Euro will not survive.

There is simply too much at stake politically for it to happen.

Just because there is a lot at stake politically doesn't mean it won't happen. What are they going to do if it does start collapsing? Pretend it's not happening? Politicians cause the problems - don't look to them to solve the very problems they created as they can't...

Regards,

crude.

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Just because there is a lot at stake politically doesn't mean it won't happen. What are they going to do if it does start collapsing? Pretend it's not happening? Politicians cause the problems - don't look to them to solve the very problems they created as they can't...

Regards,

crude.

What exactly do you mean, "start collapsing"? Countries pulling out unilaterally? Please explain.

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  • 407 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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