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I am over fifty.

I remember;

1973 power cuts, strikes, three day week. Bloody marvellous time for me. Started drinking, night-clubing, ceased to be a virgin. (I was better off on three days, as social security paid three days of benefits, without tax)

1978. Bought my first house, got married. Two incomes, no children. plenty of cash, out every night. Got my first credit cards.

1979. Thatcher became PM. I remember a sense of optimism. Here was a person who seemed to have a purpose, after the dithering of the late sixties and seventies.

1982. Falklands conflict. Sense of great National pride. We kicked the Argies good and proper.

1984. Miners strike. I was beginning to get the feeling that all was not quite right.

1985/6. Somewhere around this time, the banks started to offer mortgages, and building societies were pushing "home improvement loans". I remember loads of TV adds, encouraging people to release the equity in there homes. Retail was booming. The banks were giving money away, and I got into deep debt.

1987 ish. The easy credit seemed to be drying up. My bank was clawing back the overdraft, and the Budget Account. I managed to sell my house, and downsize to a smaller repossessed house, paid off all my debts.

1988. Started a family, did it right, twins.

1989. Inherited a modest amount of money.

1990. Needed a bigger house. The property I had bought in 1987 for £14k was now valued at £43k. Well house prices only ever go up. So we sold and bought present house £60k.

1991. Started my first business, a carpet shop. My timing was fantastic.

1993. Lost my first business, and £11k in debt.

1994 to 1999. Self employed, Negative equity, came close to losing my house a couple of times.

1999. Went back into employment, retail furniture. Boom times until 2001. Downhill ever since.

The point of the above rambling.

Seventies recession, didn't notice it, I was a young guy, out to enjoy himself.

Eighties recession, didn't know what was happening, just that I got into debt, and had to sell my house.

Nineties recession. This was the first one that I took notice of, and hurt me and my family badly.

What do you remember of the previous hard times?

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28.

Dont remember it. Too busy BMX'in and trying to programme my Spectrum. I remember we didnt have much.

You have fond memories of this book too then Bob?

basic.jpg

Can't believe I was programming at 4. Something must have gone wrong though cos I wouldn't have a clue now.

I remember the 90's recession, but was at school so it passed me by really. Folks never spent what they didn't have so we got through it, even though my Dad was made redundant.

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable

1976 - Was mugged by a strange boy in hospital for my orange juice whilst recovering from tonsillectomy. Later research discovered that the 'Fat Chinese Boy' had Down's Syndrome.

2008 - Still anxiously check the fridge three times a day in case the orange juice has been stolen. Showing great economy of effort, I have mastered karate to brown belt level. Statistically this should far outskill the martial arts abilities of anyone with Down's Syndrome. Use your past to guide you to become stronger.

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You have fond memories of this book too then Bob?

basic.jpg

Can't believe I was programming at 4. Something must have gone wrong though cos I wouldn't have a clue now.

I remember the 90's recession, but was at school so it passed me by really. Folks never spent what they didn't have so we got through it, even though my Dad was made redundant.

Well actually, the first computer I ever had was something called a Dragon 32. It was a hand-me-down, so I would sit at the desk pressing the keys 'imagining' it working.

Thats how poor me were in my day, none of these fancy multi-cell ps3 processors,just a glass of water and some imagination. We had to get up five minutes before me went to bed etc etc etc

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I think you need a finer-grain to this poll to get useful results.

I'm 33. I was doing my A-levels when we had the last recession... Much of it passed me by - I was entirely focused on other things... plus I had nothing with which to compare my adult experiences at the time.

I remember there being very few J reg cars - and that the price of scrap metal lead to thefts from building sites and the like... I don't remember any of the financial news.

I remember watching the news about Black Wednesday in 1987 - and watching "The Money Programme" which talked about M4 a lot - which I didn't understand... and could find no-one to explain - such news was followed as if it were a religion - and, like with much of scripture, very few would admit that it didn't make perfect sense to them.

I don't remember the trials and tribulations of the 70s - save for a vague recollection of power cuts and candles... I'm informed that I owe my genetic origin to power cuts and alternative forms of entertainment arising...

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Then came the commodore amiga.A fabulous machine at the time capable of, ahem, jaw dropping graphics. How times change.

I was an Atari fanboy. My mate had an Amiga and it was constant bickering whos machine was best. Happy days.

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1976 - Was mugged by a strange boy in hospital for my orange juice whilst recovering from tonsillectomy. Later research discovered that the 'Fat Chinese Boy' had Down's Syndrome.

2008 - Still anxiously check the fridge three times a day in case the orange juice has been stolen. Showing great economy of effort, I have mastered karate to brown belt level. Statistically this should far outskill the martial arts abilities of anyone with Down's Syndrome. Use your past to guide you to become stronger.

Depends how big he is now. Myabe you should brush up on your Judo, use his momentum against him, thieving ****.

p.s. I agree with your name, a dissipated youth is valuable. Discuss.

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44,and started work in 1980 and bought my first house in 1985.

This is not like the 80s or 90s when we went into recessions with low structural deficits.Then it was business as usual,houses were bought and sold(even rising some of the time),your money was safe in the Bank, there were no hidden nasties like trillions of pounds of credit default swaps waiting to be reneged on or public sector debt that was hidden off the balance sheet like the trillion superannuation deficit.This time it really feels like the Labour and the MPC c**ts have bankrupted the country .The latter with lax base rates during 2001-2003 and Labour in its desperation to spend for ''social justice'' whatever the long term repercussions..

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I'm in my 60s, so I remember a few previous 'downturns'.

The worst aspect was the mass redundancies and the constant job insecurity. On one occasion everyone in the company I worked for at the time (a medium sized business) was driven in coaches to a nearby venue and each of us was directed to one of two large halls. We were then told that everyone in the other room was being told their jobs had gone. It was over a third of the employees.

I think this time it's going to be much worse than any of the previous downturns that I can remember.

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I was a kid in the seventies but was aware of inflation, as in retail price inflation. Before barcoding it was when they had little stickers on supermarket items, and I remember they were often stuck 3 or 4 on top of one another with a new higher price each time.

Work was hard to find in the early 80s in the north, Thatcher's policies were starting to bite.

Then came the boom of the mid-late 80s, people seemed richer for a while, but then came the bust.

I remember much of the early-mid 90s as being a kind of automaton, just trudging back and forth to work to pay the mortgage/bills on a house I bought in summer 89. Got wasted, on whatever was available, as often as possible, to escape the drudgery of it all.

It passed as things do but it made me scared of debt, which is why I probably never really took part in the recent boom, rather saving for the bad times ahead.

Did well late 90s early 00s. Self-employed now, but if that goes t1ts up I could survive quite comfortably on minimum wage, or even no wage at all for a few years.

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable
Depends how big he is now. Myabe you should brush up on your Judo, use his momentum against him, thieving ****.

p.s. I agree with your name, a dissipated youth is valuable. Discuss.

I assumed a normal human growth curve, but you are right, he could be over 80ft tall by now.

Perhaps defeat by mental arithmetic is the only way.

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I assumed a normal human growth curve, but you are right, he could be over 80ft tall by now.

Perhaps defeat by mental arithmetic is the only way.

A lower risk option. Nassim Taleb might advise you to be mindful of this course of action, no-one has encountered a downs idiot-savante. Yet.

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I'm really, really ancient. I was born a Gutter Snipe...at primary school was shown how to shape and cut cardboard to put in my school shoes. Lived in care homes. Joined the Army at 17. Lost count of the number of recessions I've seen. They are bad news...but the sun always shines again...100% guaranteed. :)

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable
A lower risk option. Nassim Taleb might advise you to be mindful of this course of action, no-one has encountered a downs idiot-savante. Yet.

I have already covered this black swan event. I have a single toothpick attached to a fine gossamer cord as used widely by all magicians.

Upon throwing down the toothpicks and challenging instant counting, all that remains is to quickly wind in the cord and attached toothpick using a left leg gyration which, whilst it could be mistaken for a partial seizure, with the accompaniment of the song 'Surfing Bird' played through a portable cassette recorder, will be disguised as a dance.

Ajudication by third party will show my adversary to be wrong, and due to the length of this distraction, my getaway driver will have moved my stocks of juice to a safe distance.

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Age 45

I remember the recessions of the 70's, 80's and 90's.

However the memory that was my most abiding economic schock predates all of these.

As a small boy I remember decimalisation, and how a mars bar went from 3 old pence to 3 new pence seemingly overnight. If you think 20% food inflation is bad now try instant 100% inflation.

Of course my parents managed to convert the currency more accurately so my pocket money stayed the same in real terms -- B**stards

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Guest AuntJess
I'm in my 60s, so I remember a few previous 'downturns'.

The worst aspect was the mass redundancies and the constant job insecurity. On one occasion everyone in the company I worked for at the time (a medium sized business) was driven in coaches to a nearby venue and each of us was directed to one of two large halls. We were then told that everyone in the other room was being told their jobs had gone. It was over a third of the employees.

I think this time it's going to be much worse than any of the previous downturns that I can remember.

Me too...just :P . I agree with you. This is going to be a real fiasco. Before, people weren't as obsessed about property as 'investments' :rolleyes: . Houses were just summat one lived in - if only folk had not allowed themselves to lose sight of THAT fact :( .

Now some homeowners are acting as tho' it is an essential aspect of their life that they get a humungous dollop of cash for their domicile..... Their thought processes seem to operate along pyramid selling lines.

I heard a banker chap on a radio prog. saying that he WON'T be getting a bonus this year, since the Credit Crunch. (All together now...AWWWWWWWW)

Cor, that's tough. Guess they'll have to lay off the butler and cancel the caviar and champers weekly consignment. <_<

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I was a teenager in the 70's, I remember the recession then and especially the big increase in petrol prices as I had a Sunday job working at a garage forecourt. There was definitely a sense of gloom about, with things in the news about how people were cutting back on non-essential travel. The recession didn't really affect me much, my parents were both teachers so they weren't worried about losing their jobs, and we'd always been fairly skint so just made do as usual.

Was affected more in the next recession as I'd taken a new job in 1990 and had to sell the house to move to a different part of the country, the short story is it took 21 months to sell and a 25% cut in price. Still it worked out in the end as the new job was much better paid and there was no likelihood of layoffs.

The business I'm in (hi tech) hit the skids in 2001 with the dot com crash and ever since then I've been in frugal mode, saving as much as I can. Much more worried about unemployment these days as jobs in this area aren't so easy to come by, especially when you're older.

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Can't believe I was programming at 4. Something must have gone wrong though cos I wouldn't have a clue now.

I remember the 90's recession, but was at school so it passed me by really. Folks never spent what they didn't have so we got through it, even though my Dad was made redundant.

You were ahead of me then. I didn't start till I was 7.

Of course, I'm still doing it...

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You were ahead of me then. I didn't start till I was 7.

Of course, I'm still doing it...

I was 12. Talk about a late starter. And never was any good at it apart from getting a couple of games published in magazines. Those were the days when magazines published the code, and if you wanted to play the game you had to type it all in to your own machine. Usually several pages of it at 80 lines per page.

Anyway, I worked for the NHS during the last recession. Bombproof. Now i'm preparing to be unemployed.

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