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ken_ichikawa

Education Wise What Is Useful?

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What would be useful in terms of getting a tad higher on the job ladder, if I were to go back to university?. (currently an accountant but want to move into teaching in college/high school).

My thoughts as in the other thread are PGCE , as the government pays for it via a bursary (£6K) and it counts towards your masters degree.

I already hold a couple of degrees , computer science and an economics/business/accounting degree (paid for on my dad's dollar). And thinking of something economics based for my masters maybe an MBA.

But what would be useful to learn in university post grad if I were to go back for full time (which means going down to 4 days a week at work and the other day spent at university).

My theory is that my war chest which I was going to buy a house with , but never did and probably never will is depreciating fast real fast, so I might as well spend it , but rather than hols , drugs and fast bikes which last only a short time , some education may come in handy?.

Any thoughts?

Ta

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Nothing.

Do something like History - learn to think, learn its all a pack of lies.

Try something exotic like joint honours Physics and Classical Studies. Get both sides of it - a 'hard' science and something where you analyze both written texts and human events. Good preparation for anything.

Whereas if you train as a vet and 5 years in realise you hate it and thats it down the pan.

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Nothing.

Do something like History - learn to think, learn its all a pack of lies.

Try something exotic like joint honours Physics and Classical Studies. Get both sides of it - a 'hard' science and something where you analyze both written texts and human events. Good preparation for anything.

Whereas if you train as a vet and 5 years in realise you hate it and thats it down the pan.

That's a bit sweeping. I'm sure a veterinary degree is just as well thought of in terms of transferable skills as any other degree.

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I'd suggest physics.

Not only did it turn cells into a scientist inside 12 months, but it made him an expert on practically anything else you care to name.

Except spelling of course.

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Physics is great but it needs done properly. Can you go and do a PGCE directed towards physics without actually having a primary degree? It would explain why so many of our undergrads are such utter idiots!!

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That's a bit sweeping. I'm sure a veterinary degree is just as well thought of in terms of transferable skills as any other degree.

Doubt it.

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I thought an accountant (assuming you mean chartered) already was higher on the job ladder than a teacher? I'm not saying that's how it should be, but it does seem that way in the real world. Either way, I'm not convinced from what you're saying your primary reason for lack of career progression is much to do with a lack of education, it sounds more like you don't quite know what you want to do and are, therefore, not putting in the kind of commitment you'll need to get better and bigger jobs - not that I think that's necessarily a way to fulfillment in life but it does seem to be what you're asking about. I'd suggest spending a bit of money on some career counseling before doing anything else.

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I thought an accountant (assuming you mean chartered) already was higher on the job ladder than a teacher? I'm not saying that's how it should be, but it does seem that way in the real world. Either way, I'm not convinced from what you're saying your primary reason for lack of career progression is much to do with a lack of education, it sounds more like you don't quite know what you want to do and are, therefore, not putting in the kind of commitment you'll need to get better and bigger jobs - not that I think that's necessarily a way to fulfillment in life but it does seem to be what you're asking about. I'd suggest spending a bit of money on some career counseling before doing anything else.

I know what I don't want to do I don't want to be an accountant, I want something more fulfilling and interesting to do than accounting which is possibly the most unrewarding boring job you can imagine , to boot its not very well paid I don't even make £10 an hour gross. And I'm nearly qualified... 3 years experience...

As said my job involves generally being moaned at all the time and it is depressing me badly...y 4-6 months while I get promised such things , they never occur, sure I could jump firm but they just lie to you as well.

And the commitment thing is a bit of a barbed comment, I worked hard the first year didn't take any time off and was 2nd or 3rd highest billing every month for 12 months , did I get an recognition a promotion or interesting jobs?.

My accountancy role seems to be a sisiphian affair ie its pointless , its the same thing day in day out and I get moaned at all the time, have a look at my other thread about should I go into work on Monday.

People keep telling me to change firm but I have done , and in effect I just change the view from my desk I still do drudgery frustringly boring work which is killing me inside.

Thus I want to cut and run before its too late to do anything about it, you pass 30 and try start a new career NOBODY will take you on and thus your qualification becomes worthless.

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Back on topic I'm looking for something to do my masters in something post graduate, as I already am a double graduate, suggestions like being a vet are somewhat unhelpful since it takes a very long time to study qualify and very few people get to be them as competition for places is incredibly high.

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Back on topic I'm looking for something to do my masters in something post graduate, as I already am a double graduate, suggestions like being a vet are somewhat unhelpful since it takes a very long time to study qualify and very few people get to be them as competition for places is incredibly high.

I'm not sure a masters is what you should be looking to do. To be perfectly honest, I don't mean to sound unkind but from what you've posted the problem doesn't lie with your education, or lack thereof, but yourself. Your motivation and so on and so forth.

Why don't you retrain to be an electrician and be self employed? Or be a gas fitter, or mechanic. If you have a few quid in the bank and can afford a bit of time off to do these things the world really is your oyster.

The last thing I would recommend is teaching. Or an MBA, I doubt you'd be offered a place at your stage of your career. I wouldn't have thought a knock back would do much for your confidence.

How about doing an EngD? I think you'd meet the qualification criteria and would be looking at picking up almost 20k a year tax free whilst you do it. Miles better than the teaching bursary.

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What makes you say that?

Most of the biological sciences are the same in this regard.

Whereas Physics/Maths/Astrophysics/Engineering disciplines provide a very sound foundation in heavy duty numerical/logical work (hence are good for getting into banking etc), History based subjects tend to expose you to a lot of very differing viewpoints of the same issue and so give a thorough grounding in critical and comparative analysis of human events. History and classics were always considered good for eg civil service/management for these reasons.

Vets and biologists on the other hand are taught neither the rigour of the physicist nor the critical unbiased analysis of the historian. While they learn complex systems, these have little relevance outside the lab to anyone other than another biologist or 'nutritionist'. Ok you may learn to apply yourself for years at something that you know will be ultimately fruitless and therefore be innately attractive to an employer who needs that special skill (anyone remember their first grad jobs...?) but fundamentally little else. Yes, you learn to learn, but you learn to learn a very focussed field that is rarely reproducable outside that environment.

Just my opinion of course.

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Most of the biological sciences are the same in this regard.

Whereas Physics/Maths/Astrophysics/Engineering disciplines provide a very sound foundation in heavy duty numerical/logical work (hence are good for getting into banking etc), History based subjects tend to expose you to a lot of very differing viewpoints of the same issue and so give a thorough grounding in critical and comparative analysis of human events. History and classics were always considered good for eg civil service/management for these reasons.

Vets and biologists on the other hand are taught neither the rigour of the physicist nor the critical unbiased analysis of the historian. While they learn complex systems, these have little relevance outside the lab to anyone other than another biologist or 'nutritionist'. Ok you may learn to apply yourself for years at something that you know will be ultimately fruitless and therefore be innately attractive to an employer who needs that special skill (anyone remember their first grad jobs...?) but fundamentally little else. Yes, you learn to learn, but you learn to learn a very focussed field that is rarely reproducable outside that environment.

Just my opinion of course.

How could I, as a Chemical Engineer and Materials Scientist disagree with that? :lol:

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How could I, as a Chemical Engineer and Materials Scientist disagree with that? :lol:

+1 Mech Eng

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What would be useful in terms of getting a tad higher on the job ladder, if I were to go back to university?. (currently an accountant but want to move into teaching in college/high school).

My thoughts as in the other thread are PGCE , as the government pays for it via a bursary (£6K) and it counts towards your masters degree.

I already hold a couple of degrees , computer science and an economics/business/accounting degree (paid for on my dad's dollar). And thinking of something economics based for my masters maybe an MBA.

But what would be useful to learn in university post grad if I were to go back for full time (which means going down to 4 days a week at work and the other day spent at university).

My theory is that my war chest which I was going to buy a house with , but never did and probably never will is depreciating fast real fast, so I might as well spend it , but rather than hols , drugs and fast bikes which last only a short time , some education may come in handy?.

Any thoughts?

Ta

I have changed career a couple of times... once to teach at high school, and once to leave teaching. My motives were the same as yours seem to be. I was working as an account manager in the design industry, and wanted to do something more meaningful. My route was to study for a PGCE (secondary), which was followed by a year's teaching at a pretty tough school - at a significant cut in salary in comparison to my previous role.

I have two bits of advice.

1/ If you are interested in teaching at a High School or College, go and spend a couple of weeks in this environment shadowing teachers, talking to them and observing what they do day to day. Many absolutely love their jobs, and wouldn't do anything else. Some hate it, yet feel trapped and believe they are unable to transfer the considerable and relevant skills they have to a non-educational role. It will be an eye opener.

2/ The establishment that you work in is everything, much in the same way as in any commercial organisation. That's not to say that challenging schools are a non-starter. It means that the quality of leadership, the vision and the ethos of the school/college will be an enormous factor to consider.

My personal experience was that I jumped ship from the world of teaching after a year - but the skills, confidence, knowledge and experience that I gained was absolutely invaluable. I've no doubt that when the time comes, I will be a better parent as a result, and have a much better appreciation of people and what motivates them. I also value it as a qualification, and should I ever wish to supply teach, or return to something educational, the skills and qualification will never go away.

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Anyone watch Armstrong and Miller? It's funny because it's true :lol:

Not seen those before - thanks!! Quality...

Teaching does attract a lot of career changers. LOL

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  • 399 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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