Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
FunkyGibbon

The Curse Of The Ea Fish-eye Lens

Recommended Posts

I am currently browsing properties on Rightmove and the number of EA's that seem to have a fish-eye lens attached to their cameras when taking property photographs is astounding. It is particularly annoying because I can't even find any easy way of correcting this to have an accurate representation of what a property looks like. Could we start a petition to have this banned? It is quite clearly a material misrepresentation.

See examples attached:

fish1.JPG

fish2.JPG

post-939-1217757679_thumb.jpg

post-939-1217757691_thumb.jpg

Edited by FunkyGibbon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am currently browsing properties on Rightmove and the number of EA's that seem to have a fish-eye lens attached to their cameras when taking property photographs is astounding. It is particularly annoying because I can't even find any easy way of correcting this to have an accurate representation of what a property looks like. Could we start a petition to have this banned? It is quite clearly a material misrepresentation.

I have no sympathy with EAs, but I’ve defended this before on a similar thread. Have you ever tried photographing the interior of a room, even a good-sized room, using a regular camera lens? I have tried many times in the past, and I can assure you that you’ll be lucky to fit in half of one wall. The only way to fit a whole room in one shot is to use a wide-angle lens – not a fish-eye lens, which really would distort things, but a wide-angle lens with a focal length of about 10 mm. Inevitably this leads to distortion in the image, and can, admittedly, make a room look deceptively larger, but it at least gives a flavour of what the room looks like. It is up to the reader to make sense of the images in conjunction with the floorplan (if the EA belongs to the small proportion that has the decency to provide one) or room dimensions, and not just to look at the pictures!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This came up before in another thread. Some flats in Barnet ISTR. The agent hadn't used a fish-eye lens, but had photoshopped the images, stretching the horizontal axis by 60% or more. The giveaway was the unnaturally oviod washine machine. The interior picture in the posting above has been treated the same way, note the proportions of the furniture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have no sympathy with EAs, but I’ve defended this before on a similar thread. Have you ever tried photographing the interior of a room, even a good-sized room, using a regular camera lens? I have tried many times in the past, and I can assure you that you’ll be lucky to fit in half of one wall. The only way to fit a whole room in one shot is to use a wide-angle lens – not a fish-eye lens, which really would distort things, but a wide-angle lens with a focal length of about 10 mm. Inevitably this leads to distortion in the image, and can, admittedly, make a room look deceptively larger, but it at least gives a flavour of what the room looks like. It is up to the reader to make sense of the images in conjunction with the floorplan (if the EA belongs to the small proportion that has the decency to provide one) or room dimensions, and not just to look at the pictures!

I agree, these are shots I took with a Fisheye.

Fisheye1.jpg

fisheye2.jpg

post-7381-1217762148_thumb.jpg

post-7381-1217762158_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This came up before in another thread. Some flats in Barnet ISTR. The agent hadn't used a fish-eye lens, but had photoshopped the images, stretching the horizontal axis by 60% or more. The giveaway was the unnaturally oviod washine machine. The interior picture in the posting above has been treated the same way, note the proportions of the furniture.

This doesn't make sense to me, the pic above looks like a wide-angle lens and not photoshop; such pics, complete with wide-angle distortions, were around long before photoshop was commonplace (or even invented). Think about it -- how many EAs have photoshop skills and if they do why are they still in the job? :lol: and why would they fire up photoshop when they can achieve the desired effect at the click of a shutter release?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with this point. It may not be a fish eye lens but their is some trick photography being performed. Look at this picture below. It is a house round the corner from me. The drive looks large but when you actually stand and have a look their is barely enough room for the Citroen C1 and fiesta that actually park.

i5y9gw.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a feeling that this is a happy coincidence for the EAs. As others have pointed out, you do need a wide angle lens to fit in a decent proportion of a room (I'd say between 21 and 24 mm for film or full-frame digital) especially the smaller rooms found in luxury shoeboxes (sorry flats).

Luckily for them this has the advantage of converting a modest room into something that looks as if it ought to come with free semaphore lessons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree with this point. It may not be a fish eye lens but their is some trick photography being performed. Look at this picture below. It is a house round the corner from me. The drive looks large but when you actually stand and have a look their is barely enough room for the Citroen C1 and fiesta that actually park.

i5y9gw.jpg

Not so much trick photography IMO, as needing to use a wide-enough angle lens to get the house in from that particular vantage point. Avoiding such lenses which would severely limit what could be shown -- I'd rather have a distorted representation of what a space is like, than perfect reproduction of one corner!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This doesn't make sense to me, the pic above looks like a wide-angle lens and not photoshop; such pics, complete with wide-angle distortions, were around long before photoshop was commonplace (or even invented). Think about it -- how many EAs have photoshop skills and if they do why are they still in the job? :lol: and why would they fire up photoshop when they can achieve the desired effect at the click of a shutter release?

They use a wide angle lens to fit in the whole room, but then they stretch the horizontals. It's trivial to do with photoshop (or paintshop, which I prefer). I'll try to dig up the Barnet example again, because I corrected the EA's photos by shrinking the horixontal axis only until I got a sensible shape on the washing machine door. I needed x 0.6 I recall, to recover correct perspective. 1/0.6 = 166%.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You are not going to buy a property based on a photograph in Rightmove, however distorting it is.

Unless you're a BTL investor buying flats in a city you've never visited.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We're through the looking glass here, people.

Isn't that what happens to something as it approaches the speed of light?

Ahead fact warper 7.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 395 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.