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Mrs Bear

Where The Money Goes

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From a colleague: told by a relative a few days ago that the son and daughter in law who were ‘doing incredibly well’, lovely house, two flash cars, expensive clothes, extensions, etc. were in fact constantly coming to her for money.

Not long previously the same relative had taken the little granddaughter shopping to Tesco’s.

In the clothing dept. she saw a pink jumper with sparkly fairies on it – just the thing (as she fondly thought) to appeal to her little granddaughter. ‘Would you like Granny to buy it for you?’

From her perch in the shopping trolley the child looked down her nose. ‘I only wear designer.’

She was THREE.

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:(

I also know of people who won't put their kids in anything cheaper than Next clothes (admittedly bought ahead in the sales, so I guess they're last season's fashion - not that pink and purple and blue and khaki really ever change) party clothes come from miniature Monsoon and the like...

Supermarkets do some great stuff, and bearing in mind how quickly little people grow, it's not worth the financial outlay for anything more really - I wonder what'll happen when that family start to feel the pinch - and the little girl turns her nose up at the supermarket stuff her parents have had to buy, as it's cheaper?!

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Maybe the child just had some taste and didn't like pink ? My three can't stand it.

I just knew someone would say that.

Neither did my elder daughter (hated anything over-girly and still does), but that's hardly the point. The child didn't say, 'Granny, I don't really like pink things.'

I find it shocking and sad that any three year old, FGS, should use the word 'designer' or even be conscious of such things.

But maybe I'm weird.

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From a colleague: told by a relative a few days ago that the son and daughter in law who were ‘doing incredibly well’, lovely house, two flash cars, expensive clothes, extensions, etc. were in fact constantly coming to her for money.

Not long previously the same relative had taken the little granddaughter shopping to Tesco’s.

In the clothing dept. she saw a pink jumper with sparkly fairies on it – just the thing (as she fondly thought) to appeal to her little granddaughter. ‘Would you like Granny to buy it for you?’

From her perch in the shopping trolley the child looked down her nose. ‘I only wear designer.’

She was THREE.

Maybe the child just had some taste and didn't like pink ? My three can't stand it.

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Absolutely.

One of the most shocking things I find about the modern world is the amount of money parents spend on kids. Children don't need all this rubbish. My lad has his clothes bought at Asda or Sainsbury and he's fine with it.

The other thing that annoys me is that parents won't accept second hand clothes from a relative. My son had a cousin who was a year younger so we washed a whole load of his clothes that were virtually new but were too small, only the very best stuff, to give to his cousins mum. She didn't want to know (this was when the lad was 2 btw), said she only wanted him to have new stuff.

You can't deal with idiots like that can you.

I've got a 4 motnh old baby and I can't believe how much 'used' clothing we've been given from friends and family. Loads of it looks like it was never worn. I have to stifle a "How much did all this cost, you fools?" in between very, very, very gratefully accepting it.

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A sad reflection on the shallow brand led consumer society we exist in. A recession / depression is just what such spoiled brats need in my opinion.

Absolutely.

One of the most shocking things I find about the modern world is the amount of money parents spend on kids. Children don't need all this rubbish. My lad has his clothes bought at Asda or Sainsbury and he's fine with it.

The other thing that annoys me is that parents won't accept second hand clothes from a relative. My son had a cousin who was a year younger so we washed a whole load of his clothes that were virtually new but were too small, only the very best stuff, to give to his cousins mum. She didn't want to know (this was when the lad was 2 btw), said she only wanted him to have new stuff.

You can't deal with idiots like that can you.

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Absolutely.

One of the most shocking things I find about the modern world is the amount of money parents spend on kids. Children don't need all this rubbish. My lad has his clothes bought at Asda or Sainsbury and he's fine with it.

The other thing that annoys me is that parents won't accept second hand clothes from a relative. My son had a cousin who was a year younger so we washed a whole load of his clothes that were virtually new but were too small, only the very best stuff, to give to his cousins mum. She didn't want to know (this was when the lad was 2 btw), said she only wanted him to have new stuff.

You can't deal with idiots like that can you.

The economy will deal with these designer tarts and the brats they are raising hopefully. Some "old fashioned" values and a bit of worry/stress/making do/ cutting back etc is character building in my opinion. With no latest toys or computers kids may even go back to playing outside again.

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From a colleague: told by a relative a few days ago that the son and daughter in law who were ‘doing incredibly well’, lovely house, two flash cars, expensive clothes, extensions, etc. were in fact constantly coming to her for money.

In my experience, people like the above couple are usually (a) liars, up to their ears in debt, or (B) all of [a] and scroungers as well, or © drug dealers who are scroungers as well.

During the last recession I saw a few of these literally disappear overnight, leaving empty house and frequent subsequent callers, who asked the neighbours for 'present whereabouts' info.

Nothing changes....

PS That daft emoticon with the dark glasses has appeared above of its own volition. There's nothing cool about the w**nkers I'm talking about.

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When I list items, I use the square bracket

1] because it works

2] because it never turns into an annoying emoticon

3] because it shows I know about these things and care enough

:)

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From a colleague: told by a relative a few days ago that the son and daughter in law who were ‘doing incredibly well’, lovely house, two flash cars, expensive clothes, extensions, etc. were in fact constantly coming to her for money.

Not long previously the same relative had taken the little granddaughter shopping to Tesco’s.

In the clothing dept. she saw a pink jumper with sparkly fairies on it – just the thing (as she fondly thought) to appeal to her little granddaughter. ‘Would you like Granny to buy it for you?’

From her perch in the shopping trolley the child looked down her nose. ‘I only wear designer.’

She was THREE.

That makes me feel almost physically sick. Putting the title as "out of the mouths of babes" is good, because of course this little girl doesn't know any better - she is just parrotting what her mummy has told her. What is scary is that the mummy (or the daddy) are so pathetically insecure that they must tell their child as a way of feeling superior to others that the clothes they wear make them "better". If it was morals, religion etc I could at least understand it, but bloody clothes for a child... :ph34r:

For the non-parents amongst readers (I honestly wouldn't have appreciated the full extent before fathering), I am merely stating a commonplace observation when I say that while a couple of items fancy brands are nice to receive as presents or to wear for special occasions, children's clothes last for 6 months in size and are constantly covered with food, vomit, dirt or dribble and so "designer branding" for kids is one of the silliest vanities one can conceive.

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When my daughter started school one of her classmates mothers told with great pride a story of when her young daughter pointed at a ladies accessory and said "handbag" to which the mother replied "It''s not handbag darling, it's Prada".

In my experience, people like the above couple are usually (a) liars, up to their ears in debt, or (B) all of [a] and scroungers as well, or © drug dealers who are scroungers as well.

Not so in this case. The mother in question features in the marketing material of a property club explaining how they helped her to buy an off plan luxury appartment in Wolverhampton (unseen) as an investment. "They even arranged the finance". She is now looking to buy an overseas property through the same firm. How does such a shrewd cookie manage to turn a pre-school age child into a label slut ?

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Absolutely.

One of the most shocking things I find about the modern world is the amount of money parents spend on kids. Children don't need all this rubbish. My lad has his clothes bought at Asda or Sainsbury and he's fine with it.

The other thing that annoys me is that parents won't accept second hand clothes from a relative. My son had a cousin who was a year younger so we washed a whole load of his clothes that were virtually new but were too small, only the very best stuff, to give to his cousins mum. She didn't want to know (this was when the lad was 2 btw), said she only wanted him to have new stuff.

You can't deal with idiots like that can you.

Doesn't it make you want to weep with frustration?! No chance for a planet when it is over populated with follicly challenged chimpanzees like this. I know I would be very pleased if someone provided me such hand me downs. Why waste perfectly good items.

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The economy will deal with these designer tarts and the brats they are raising hopefully. Some "old fashioned" values and a bit of worry/stress/making do/ cutting back etc is character building in my opinion. With no latest toys or computers kids may even go back to playing outside again.

Ms D'oh and I have just moved into a new rental on an estate built in the late 70s. A lot of the houses are focussed on a LARGE park and there are smaller parks and green spaces dotted around...unlike any recent estate I have seen in Oxfordshire. Kids are outside all the time playing and screaming and being kids. Lovely to see and hear...instead of the dead silence of our previous, more recent, estate. How can town planners have let this happen?!

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That makes me feel almost physically sick. Putting the title as "out of the mouths of babes" is good, because of course this little girl doesn't know any better - she is just parrotting what her mummy has told her. What is scary is that the mummy (or the daddy) are so pathetically insecure that they must tell their child as a way of feeling superior to others that the clothes they wear make them "better". If it was morals, religion etc I could at least understand it, but bloody clothes for a child... :ph34r:

For the non-parents amongst readers (I honestly wouldn't have appreciated the full extent before fathering), I am merely stating a commonplace observation when I say that while a couple of items fancy brands are nice to receive as presents or to wear for special occasions, children's clothes last for 6 months in size and are constantly covered with food, vomit, dirt or dribble and so "designer branding" for kids is one of the silliest vanities one can conceive.

After the OP I remembered another story: article in one of the Sunday mags about some footballer and his family. A son of 9 or 10 told the interviewer that all his clothes were designer. He had to wear all designer things or "people will just think I'm a horrible little boy."

I'm beginning to wonder whether Prada will start doing nappies. Or have they already? :(

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When my daughter started school one of her classmates mothers told with great pride a story of when her young daughter pointed at a ladies accessory and said "handbag" to which the mother replied "It''s not handbag darling, it's Prada".

Not so in this case. The mother in question features in the marketing material of a property club explaining how they helped her to buy an off plan luxury appartment in Wolverhampton (unseen) as an investment. "They even arranged the finance". She is now looking to buy an overseas property through the same firm. How does such a shrewd cookie manage to turn a pre-school age child into a label slut ?

Have you asked lately how the Wolverhampton investment is doing? She might have had to pawn that Prada bag by now. ;)

I like 'label slut' BTW.

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i think immaculate and/or trendy children look a bit wierd. It often appears to be oppressive mums playing barbie with their offspring.

Children are supposed to be a bit scruffy and sticky faced. The cheaper the clothes the more okay it is for the kid to roll around in the mud

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Doesn't it make you want to weep with frustration?! No chance for a planet when it is over populated with follicly challenged chimpanzees like this. I know I would be very pleased if someone provided me such hand me downs. Why waste perfectly good items.

Anyone else with such things to give away (or wanting similar, come to that) do try Freecycle. We used it to offload a practically prehistoric TV* we thought nobody could possibly want, but someone did, and the listings had masses of baby clothes and equipment. It's split into very local areas - the bloke who took our TV only lived about a mile away.

*Mr Bear had bought it for his folks back in the 70s - a state-of-the-art Sony at the time - and it had been sitting in our loft for the ten yrs since his old man died. And still working perfectly.

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I just knew someone would say that.

Neither did my elder daughter (hated anything over-girly and still does), but that's hardly the point. The child didn't say, 'Granny, I don't really like pink things.'

I find it shocking and sad that any three year old, FGS, should use the word 'designer' or even be conscious of such things.

But maybe I'm weird.

You're not weird in my book. That poor three year old has already been conditioned into thinking in terms of competing with the neighbours on outward things. That is the saddest part.

In my experience, only the poor and the people used to having plenty of money know the true value of money - and live accordingly. And don't give a rat's **** for what the neighbours think.

Edited to add: ... and posters on this website, obviously.

Edited by OverseasInterest

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The other thing that annoys me is that parents won't accept second hand clothes from a relative.

Jim I agree with your general annoyance, but there are some people just have a thing about second hand clothes, and not always an affluence/brand thing.

For example my wife finds it slightly strange that I'm happy wearing clothing that belonged to my late step-father. She's Ok about me doing it but would feel really uncomfortable wearing second hand herself. Its odd, she's 100% with you on childrens clothing - I've a loft full of kids stuff waiting for the possibility of grandchildren.

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Jim I agree with your general annoyance, but there are some people just have a thing about second hand clothes, and not always an affluence/brand thing.

For example my wife finds it slightly strange that I'm happy wearing clothing that belonged to my late step-father. She's Ok about me doing it but would feel really uncomfortable wearing second hand herself. Its odd, she's 100% with you on childrens clothing - I've a loft full of kids stuff waiting for the possibility of grandchildren.

When my dad died my mum gave me a couple of his hardly worn formal shirts, which I wear now if I need to wear a suit.

I grew up as the youngest of three brothers, so I had no choice really. The only problem was that my next brother up was a lot fatter than me so his jeans were always too baggy ;)

The best bargain I ever got was one of those Joy Divison/Echo & Bunnymen long coats if you know what I mean. 50p at a jumble sale, practically new, saw me through many winters.

I think women feel more pressure in terms of looks and fashion than men, due to our sexist society, so perhaps it is harder for women to wear second hand items. Though I don't think they have a problem buying these second hand designer dresses from Oxfam or whatever.

Still, the kids thing is on a whole different level.

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My youngest two wear anything from designer down to tescos, Primark and George. I always buy the designer clothes in the sale and prices are therefore not much different to Tescos etc. IMO Tescos is prety naff for Boys clothes anyway and toddlers clothes are pretty cheap anyway so its never going to break the bank. My 17 month old has had so much clothes that some still have the labels in them. its lucky that we have a younger boy as well.

Its when your child gets to secondary school and they tell you that its not fair that they cant have a PS3, XBOX 360, WII, Latest Phone etc that the fun starts. They also want to go on the schools yearly holiday which can costs anywhere between £900-£1500 in my experience.

Ive seen parents go bankrupt due to giving their kids every latests gadget.

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  • 399 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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