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Flat For Rent - No Pets, No Kids!

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A lot of rentals are "no kids", it's one of the main reasons why people aren't having as many kids as they used to... their landlord won't let them.

It's outrageous nimbyism... "ooh, I wouldn't want grubby fingerprints on my nice magnolia walls" etc. from the UK's cartel of landowner barons.

I don't see any practical reason for it either... if the kid damages something, it comes out of the deposit, the same way as anything else does. What the hell is the problem with landlords? Are they all born with a mole in the shape of a swastika and a predetermined preference for eugenics?

Seriously, what the hell is going through their heads?

"Only the rich and the chavs have the right to breed, I will support this eradication of the middle and working classes by making my property portfolio no-kids-allowed".

Edited by DementedTuna

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Since it's only a 1 bed you might find it difficult to have kids there too.

More to the point, these LLs will have to loosen up soon because less and less people will want to rent their crapholes. Of course plenty will think the solution to not getting a tenant immediately is to raise rent and tack on restrictions, but then the average BTLer only has an IQ of around 10

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I've constantly been coming across this problem for a few months now. Bit of a problem for me as I have a six month old and cannot afford to buy. I am taking legal advice and have been consulted on the possibility of taking this to european court of human rights. This could be a biggy.

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It's a 1 bed flat. You'd have to be insane to put a child in there a anyway.

Unless if the parent was to sleep in the room deemed as the living room, but I take your point.

But is it legal to actually specify 'No Kids?'

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I've constantly been coming across this problem for a few months now. Bit of a problem for me as I have a six month old and cannot afford to buy. I am taking legal advice and have been consulted on the possibility of taking this to european court of human rights. This could be a biggy.

Good for you. I'm not a particular fan of the ECHR, but finally, a worthy cause.

Good luck.

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable
A lot of rentals are "no kids", it's one of the main reasons why people aren't having as many kids as they used to... their landlord won't let them.

Surely there must be some pro-child NGO which can lobby on the basis of equality?

This would seem to be a pretty easy target.

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Surely there must be some pro-child NGO which can lobby on the basis of equality?

This would seem to be a pretty easy target.

Yeah, you'd think they would, especially since the Dogs Trust have already called on landlords to let tenants have pets.

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I've got no problem with a 'no kids' rule. They create a huge amount of noise and disruption, of the sort that can easily be accommodated in a larger property but not in a small flat without disturbing the neighbours' peace. The last thing the LL wants is for the neighbours around his flat to try and get a noise abatement order slapped on him, which they'd be perfectly reasonable in doing (and which if it was me, I wouldn't hesitate to do) if they were repeatedly kept up by screaming and crying in the middle of the night before getting up to go to work.

I wish they'd also introduce 'no kids' long-haul flights, too. If your average airline which operates 5-6 transatlantic flights a day introduced a minimum passenger age of 21 for just one of them, it wouldn't seriously inconvienience Gordo's beloved 'hard working families', but it would give passengers who don't want to spend nine hours next to a screaming brat the chance to avoid doing so. I'd be willing to pay a significant mark-up to travel on such a flight.

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable
I've got no problem with a 'no kids' rule. They create a huge amount of noise and disruption, of the sort that can easily be accommodated in a larger property but not in a small flat without disturbing the neighbours' peace. The last thing the LL wants is for the neighbours around his flat to try and get a noise abatement order slapped on him, which they'd be perfectly reasonable in doing (and which if it was me, I wouldn't hesitate to do) if they were repeatedly kept up by screaming and crying in the middle of the night before getting up to go to work.

I wish they'd also introduce 'no kids' long-haul flights, too. If your average airline which operates 5-6 transatlantic flights a day introduced a minimum passenger age of 21 for just one of them, it wouldn't seriously inconvienience Gordo's beloved 'hard working families', but it would give passengers who don't want to spend nine hours next to a screaming brat the chance to avoid doing so. I'd be willing to pay a significant mark-up to travel on such a flight.

I'm assuming you've never pissed, shat, vomited or made much noise?

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I've constantly been coming across this problem for a few months now. Bit of a problem for me as I have a six month old and cannot afford to buy. I am taking legal advice and have been consulted on the possibility of taking this to european court of human rights. This could be a biggy.

I wonder if your kids would be 18 by the time the case was heard?

Dumb question but if you adopt or have kids whilst you are in there, can the landlord kick you out for violating the tenancy?

VMR.

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I wonder if your kids would be 18 by the time the case was heard?

Dumb question but if you adopt or have kids whilst you are in there, can the landlord kick you out for violating the tenancy?

VMR.

Landlord can kick you out whenever he likes with absolutely no reason. Doesn't even need an excuse.

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Although it's all a sad indicment of our housing culture, I'm quite pleased that my landlady specifies no pets or children. The noise and smell coming from the neighbouring flats would piss me off.

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"No children" has been held by the OFT to be an unfair term in leasing contracts (assured shorthold at least, and I think others as well). It is therefore unenforceable in law. Similarly the no pets rule etc. Basically if you have a letting contract then the leased house is legally your home and you can do all the things that a resident of any home could reasonably do.

For a very detailed guide see the OFT website Unfair Contract Terms [PDF]

Extract:

Potentially unreasonable restriction: Unfair Term [the Tenant must not] allow children on the premises

Way of revising term: [The tenant must not] allow children to live in the property without the landlord's consent which will not be unreasonably withheld.

So if landlord kicked you out for having kids, against the terms of your lease :blink: you could sue them and would likely win.

Doesn't stop them refusing to accept tenants with kids initially though.

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And that's the underlying cause of the problem. People who are at the stage in their lives at which they want to bring up kids can't afford the type of accommodation best suited to doing so in. If they could, no-one in their right mind would be contemplating having children in a one-bedroom flat.

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"No children" has been held by the OFT to be an unfair term in leasing contracts (assured shorthold at least, and I think others as well). It is therefore unenforceable in law. Similarly the no pets rule etc. Basically if you have a letting contract then the leased house is legally your home and you can do all the things that a resident of any home could reasonably do.

For a very detailed guide see the OFT website Unfair Contract Terms [PDF]

Extract:

Potentially unreasonable restriction: Unfair Term [the Tenant must not] allow children on the premises

Way of revising term: [The tenant must not] allow children to live in the property without the landlord's consent which will not be unreasonably withheld.

So if landlord kicked you out for having kids, against the terms of your lease :blink: you could sue them and would likely win.

Doesn't stop them refusing to accept tenants with kids initially though.

Can the same apply to pets? I'm not supposed to have pets in my house but i'm considering getting some sort of small rodent type thing anyway since they don't exactly mess up the place, plus our flat is unfurnished so having a larger pet wouldn't make much difference anyway.

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Can the same apply to pets? I'm not supposed to have pets in my house but i'm considering getting some sort of small rodent type thing anyway since they don't exactly mess up the place, plus our flat is unfurnished so having a larger pet wouldn't make much difference anyway.

Don't worry about it, go ahead and do what you want, just make sure you don't cause any damage or at least leave the place as you found it

I rented for 5 years with my cat in places with "no pets" rules, I couldn't give a stuff what they say to be honest, although I always moved him out for half a day if the landlord/agent was visiting

It really is none of their business, and pretty much un-enforceable, although you might get kicked out at the end of your AST, which is a whole other subject

Don't let these BTL NIMBY scum bully you around

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I think the practical reason why many LLs have a 'no pets' clause is a desire not to be held in any way legally responsible if a tenant's Staffordshire bull terrier seriously injures a neighbour or visitor. Mine has no problem with my cat.

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I think the practical reason why many LLs have a 'no pets' clause is a desire not to be held in any way legally responsible if a tenant's Staffordshire bull terrier seriously injures a neighbour or visitor. Mine has no problem with my cat.

Nah, years of property porn and the AST has given these people the impression we are all lodging in their spare room, the inside track seminars and ego massaging of Estate Agents has led these morons to believe they can dictate how people live their lives in their own homes, the whole industry is geared around the "landlord" basically being encouraged to bully people around, even more so now that they are all operating on such hideously tight margins

They essentially want "professional" (:lol:) tenants who walk around their pensions in hermetically sealed suits living on water and rice

No kids, no pets etc is basically included because everyone else is doing it, its (apparently) not illegal, and any restrictions they can put in place in their eyes reduce wear and tear and their obligation to tidy up between tenants

Edited by pete.hpc

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I think the practical reason why many LLs have a 'no pets' clause is a desire not to be held in any way legally responsible if a tenant's Staffordshire bull terrier seriously injures a neighbour or visitor. Mine has no problem with my cat.

The LL wouldn't be responsible for that anyway, the dog's owner would. Also, Staffs are lovely dogs, and great for children, they just have a bad rep because they look quite muscly and have strong jaws. My friend has two staffs and they are the daftest dogs ever and extremely friendly.

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Im sorry, but what about my right to live somewhere where kids arent allowed? Its by far one of the best things about city centre living in a flat, no scummy kids stood around, or going around on bikes, crying etc

I've constantly been coming across this problem for a few months now. Bit of a problem for me as I have a six month old and cannot afford to buy. I am taking legal advice and have been consulted on the possibility of taking this to european court of human rights. This could be a biggy.

Are you sure you can afford to have a child? Could be a biggy.

Edited by Johnny Storm

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  • 395 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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