Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Peridot

Lock Problem

Recommended Posts

It's me again! Another problem has occurred over the weekend (no visits thank goodness) but I would really appreciate some advice.

Due to the unannounced visits whilst I was at work last week by the landlord, I had a locksmith in on Saturday to change the locks. I did tell the agent this and he was fine about it. The locksmith told me that my doors have no locking bar and therefore means that anyone could get in by inserting a screwdriver into the lock. Am now worried. I had a friend round to clarify things and the situation is that both the front and back door are old UPVC doors. All that keeps them locked are four sliding locks which are activated when you lift the handle up. The key does not operate any locking bar mechanism - all it does it stop the handle from being lifted.

Circumstances: I'm a woman living on my own. The village I live in is, fortunately, quite wealthy, small and I assume has a low crime rate. However the wider area it is in is just a standard part of the country surrounded by very ordinary towns only minutes away. If someone was to get in, it's unlikely I would hear them tampering with the lock if I was asleep. My house is detatched, made of stone, double-glazed and the walls are 2 feet thick - nobody is going to hear me. There is no phone line upstairs and my mobile phone has no reception in my bedroom - only one part of the house gets reception. The front door and back door have no other locks on them nor a chain. There is only one streetlight in the street and it's not near me - anyone trying the lock would be in the dark and obscured by my car in the drive (driveway is higher than the house). My worries are that my house is empty 13 hours a day whilst I'm at work and I've also read that most women are attacked by people they know (ie jealous ex-boyfriends) or stranger stalkers. Also, although the door looks like any other UPVC door from the outside, previous tenants know how it operates.

Is it very easy to gain entry to a house this way? Does it take very long to work the lock? Am I overreacting??? How do the men reading this feel if it was their sister/girlfriend/daughter living there? Am I within my rights to ask the landlord to fit new doors - does he have a legal obligation to do this or just a moral obligation? The relationship with the letting agent (which had been good) is now a bit frosty due to what happened last week with the visits. He knows I want to leave the property and may think I'm using this as a ploy especially as he keeps saying how safe the village is but I'm seriously not - I am genuinely worried especially at night. Would appreciate any advice - thankyou.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Given that there's nothing actually wrong with the doors, i.e. they open and close and don't fall off the hinges when you do so! -I don't think the landlord is under any obligation to replace them. If a tenant requires Fort Knox security as a dealbreaker, it's something that should be clarified on initial inspection - caveat emptor, and all that.

However, if you are now unhappy about the rest of the village / your past friends/ enemies boyfriends / partners / etc breaking in, surely the first step is to phone the locksmith who has been there and ask him how to beef up security? Or if you think he will just try to flog you an expensive system, the police will advise - I don't know the precise department name, but 10 minutes on Google should produce it (or a phone call / visit to your local nick or library).

Edit : are you more worried about being burgled while you are in, or out? If it's about when you are in, there are gadgets directed at travellers in dodgy hotels, and students in Rigsby-type bedsits, which jam the door shut from the inside.

Edited by cartimandua51

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Given that there's nothing actually wrong with the doors, i.e. they open and close and don't fall off the hinges when you do so! -I don't think the landlord is under any obligation to replace them. If a tenant requires Fort Knox security as a dealbreaker, it's something that should be clarified on initial inspection - caveat emptor, and all that.

However, if you are now unhappy about the rest of the village / your past friends/ enemies boyfriends / partners / etc breaking in, surely the first step is to phone the locksmith who has been there and ask him how to beef up security? Or if you think he will just try to flog you an expensive system, the police will advise - I don't know the precise department name, but 10 minutes on Google should produce it (or a phone call / visit to your local nick or library).

I agree. My insurance company require high security and I always negotiate it before hand when signing the lease. Indeed I paid for locks to be fitted with the LL permisison on a few occassions.

Peridot may be wise to ask if she can have some locks fitted on the door herself. I had some put on an old set of sliding doors which the locksmith recommended. It was a kind of bolt mechanism attached to the frame inside and that bolt then slid into a new hole drilled in the door frame. It had a lock on it which operated with a key and just stopped the doors being physically slid back even if the old central lock was forced open with a screwdriver. I think it was a Chubb one and did not cost much - although fitting was extra.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies. I've actually checked if the landlord is responsible and have been advised by a legal professional that it is their responsibility to ensure the house is safe. They are therefore responsible for changing locks if they are unsafe. I called the locksmith today and he said anyone could break in in 3 seconds using two screwdrivers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the replies. I've actually checked if the landlord is responsible and have been advised by a legal professional that it is their responsibility to ensure the house is safe. They are therefore responsible for changing locks if they are unsafe. I called the locksmith today and he said anyone could break in in 3 seconds using two screwdrivers.

Hmm. Well, I wish you luck, but "safe" is as long as a piece of string! NOTHING will keep a determined intruder out - a brick through a window springs to mind? Taking the tiles off the roof to access through the loft?

I do wonder why you moved to your present place; if someone is really worried about security then a third floor flat in a gated community is the safest I can think of.

But if you keep bothering your landlord for extra security measures he may let you off your contract just to get rid of you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the replies. I've actually checked if the landlord is responsible and have been advised by a legal professional that it is their responsibility to ensure the house is safe. They are therefore responsible for changing locks if they are unsafe. I called the locksmith today and he said anyone could break in in 3 seconds using two screwdrivers.

I don't mean to be rude, but why don't you just rent somewhere you're happy with? It's one of the biggest advantages to renting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the replies. I've actually checked if the landlord is responsible and have been advised by a legal professional that it is their responsibility to ensure the house is safe. They are therefore responsible for changing locks if they are unsafe. I called the locksmith today and he said anyone could break in in 3 seconds using two screwdrivers.

Firstly I am glad I am not your landlord, you are what one would call a "vexatious" tenant.

Unless you live in a cave I am presuming your house has glass windows which take ohh about 1 millisecond to break, provided the locks are a Yale type or a 5 level mortice locks they are deemed suitable for household use. The idea of locks is too prevent people opening the doors/windows to get your posessions out, they don't do much to stop people getting in the house if they really want and any door would bust open with a simple crow-bar in one second flat.

If you want more security, go out and buy it. A pair of £15 dead-bolts will give your the security you desire

Landlord are not registered charities and I suspect you may start to exceed the charitability of yours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Firstly I am glad I am not your landlord, you are what one would call a "vexatious" tenant.

Unless you live in a cave I am presuming your house has glass windows which take ohh about 1 millisecond to break, provided the locks are a Yale type or a 5 level mortice locks they are deemed suitable for household use. The idea of locks is too prevent people opening the doors/windows to get your posessions out, they don't do much to stop people getting in the house if they really want and any door would bust open with a simple crow-bar in one second flat.

If you want more security, go out and buy it. A pair of £15 dead-bolts will give your the security you desire

Landlord are not registered charities and I suspect you may start to exceed the charitability of yours.

I'm not expecting my landlord to be a charity however I do expect him to adhere to basic security regulations - a locking bar on the door and window locks is not a big deal. As a a landlord I would have expected you to be more up-to-date on insurance requirements: FYI Yale type locks are not permitted as they do not require a key to be turned when leaving the property. I am not expecting increased security - just basic. Windows can be broken but they cause noise in doing so - thieves don't like that. Approching a property with a crowbar looks suspicious, approaching it with two screwdrivers doesn't as it looks like you might have a key. I am not vexatious - just security conscious. Ask your mother/daughter/wife/sister if she fancies living in a property alone which can be broken into silently within 3 seconds using a screwdriver. Thieves will get in any house eventually but it's the effort and noise involved that's the decider. Zero effort and zero noise is unacceptable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not expecting my landlord to be a charity however I do expect him to adhere to basic security regulations - a locking bar on the door and window locks is not a big deal. As a a landlord I would have expected you to be more up-to-date on insurance requirements: FYI Yale type locks are not permitted as they do not require a key to be turned when leaving the property. I am not expecting increased security - just basic. Windows can be broken but they cause noise in doing so - thieves don't like that. Approching a property with a crowbar looks suspicious, approaching it with two screwdrivers doesn't as it looks like you might have a key. I am not vexatious - just security conscious. Ask your mother/daughter/wife/sister if she fancies living in a property alone which can be broken into silently within 3 seconds using a screwdriver. Thieves will get in any house eventually but it's the effort and noise involved that's the decider. Zero effort and zero noise is unacceptable.

I (as a single woman living alone) once lived in a ground floor flat where it was actually quicker to get in though the window using a credit card/ piece of wood to lift the latch than to go in through the front door! And this was in SE London (Penge / Crystal Palace to be precise). And I was never burgled (though, ironically, the policeman in the flat above me was!).

However, the bottom line is that you inspected the property before signing the lease (didn't you?). This is not something that has gone wrong after you moved in, it's something you didn't take the time and care to check out first. If you had done, you would either have insisted on an upgrade before you signed, giving the landlord chance to either do it or say No, in which case you would have presumably looked elsewhere.

Edited by cartimandua51

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not expecting my landlord to be a charity however I do expect him to adhere to basic security regulations - a locking bar on the door and window locks is not a big deal. As a a landlord I would have expected you to be more up-to-date on insurance requirements: FYI Yale type locks are not permitted as they do not require a key to be turned when leaving the property. I am not expecting increased security - just basic. Windows can be broken but they cause noise in doing so - thieves don't like that. Approching a property with a crowbar looks suspicious, approaching it with two screwdrivers doesn't as it looks like you might have a key. I am not vexatious - just security conscious. Ask your mother/daughter/wife/sister if she fancies living in a property alone which can be broken into silently within 3 seconds using a screwdriver. Thieves will get in any house eventually but it's the effort and noise involved that's the decider. Zero effort and zero noise is unacceptable.

I am afraid you are wrong, you take a property on an "as seen" basis, if you don't like the security arrangements don't rent the property, that simple, there is no obligation what so ever for a LL to keep a property up to date with the latest thinking or requirements for security etc.

The only obligation a LL landlord has is covered either in the contract or under S11 of the 1985 LTA

And yes I have a wife and a sister and we all live in rural suroundings and yes I and my brother in law are away a lot on business and yes both my wife and sister frequently forget to lock the doors.

Reading the Daily Mail too often? the risk to you in a rural area is tiny, aggravated burglary is very rare outside major cities.

Edited by Matt Henson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I rent and have a basic wooden door with one yale and one chubb lock. I have a wife and two kids. I contacted my LL and told them I wanted to fit two sliding bolts on for extra security at night and was prepared to pay for this myself, luckily they said they would cover the costs.

It is very easy to install extra bolts at the top and bottom of doors. It will then not be easy to gain access whilst you are in the property.

Get some extra locks fitted and be prepared to cover the costs yourself.

Thousands of women live alone and thousands live with children and no partner. Get permission to fit new locks and if they say yes but they will not cover the costs then just be happy that you got permission.

I travel for buisness quite a bit and I now have peace of mind but as I said I would have paid for that peace of mind myself.

Bosh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am afraid you are wrong, you take a property on an "as seen" basis, if you don't like the security arrangements don't rent the property, that simple, there is no obligation what so ever for a LL to keep a property up to date with the latest thinking or requirements for security etc.

The only obligation a LL landlord has is covered either in the contract or under S11 of the 1985 LTA

And yes I have a wife and a sister and we all live in rural suroundings and yes I and my brother in law are away a lot on business and yes both my wife and sister frequently forget to lock the doors.

Reading the Daily Mail to often? the risk to you in a rural area is tiny, aggravated burglary is very rare outside major cities.

At least your wife and sister have a lock on the door to use. Forgetting to use it is a different matter. Does your sister live alone? Living with a man who travels a lot is different to a woman living alone permanently. People notice a woman living on her own - believe me, I had a lot of comments on why wasn't I married etc in my last house. It's also proven that most women are attacked by people they know (ie jealous ex-boyfriends) or by stalkers than random burglars/strangers. I would like to know that the house I am living in could withstand more than 3 seconds of a silent break-in if I was unlucky enough to attract the attention of a stalker. I am not asking for a landlord to keep up to date on the latest security requirements, just adhere to the basics and what a standard insurance company requires. That is not asking a lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I rent and have a basic wooden door with one yale and one chubb lock. I have a wife and two kids. I contacted my LL and told them I wanted to fit two sliding bolts on for extra security at night and was prepared to pay for this myself, luckily they said they would cover the costs.

It is very easy to install extra bolts at the top and bottom of doors. It will then not be easy to gain access whilst you are in the property.

Get some extra locks fitted and be prepared to cover the costs yourself.

Thousands of women live alone and thousands live with children and no partner. Get permission to fit new locks and if they say yes but they will not cover the costs then just be happy that you got permission.

I travel for buisness quite a bit and I now have peace of mind but as I said I would have paid for that peace of mind myself.

Bosh

I would prefer a wooden door but unfortunately mine is UPVC. Any locks fitted need to be external locks - not just sliding bolts to prevent access when I am not there. I do not see why I should shell out to make the house comply with regular insurance regulations. I am not asking for something ridiculous - just basic security. I have already paid £75 for new locks. I rented last 10 years ago and never had this kind of problem. Both properties had wooden doors with a Yale lock and a mortice look together - perfectly fine. I would not be asking for extra locks if I had this. Anyone would think I was asking for the world - I am purely trying to comply with my insurance regulations and feel relatively safe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
At least your wife and sister have a lock on the door to use. Forgetting to use it is a different matter. Does your sister live alone? Living with a man who travels a lot is different to a woman living alone permanently. People notice a woman living on her own - believe me, I had a lot of comments on why wasn't I married etc in my last house. It's also proven that most women are attacked by people they know (ie jealous ex-boyfriends) or by stalkers than random burglars/strangers. I would like to know that the house I am living in could withstand more than 3 seconds of a silent break-in if I was unlucky enough to attract the attention of a stalker. I am not asking for a landlord to keep up to date on the latest security requirements, just adhere to the basics and what a standard insurance company requires. That is not asking a lot.

It cost the LL money he does not need to spend, so yes it is asking a lot... Sorry but you rented the wrong house so it not your landlords problem... as mentioned early if somebody wanted to get in your house they would regardless of security arrangments. Insurance standard locks are there to protect the insurance companies risk and not you (i.e your possesions when you are not in the house)

However being constructive, I bought this system http://www.ebuyer.com/product/131020 for £57 it is excelent and you can add new door and window detectors for £15 a time and a siren, it also takes a recording of intruders and emails it out if somebody tries to disable it. Much better than a few locks in my mind. We had a problem with unwelcome LL visits and this stopped them in their tracks

Also try this one, all the accesories work with the one above

http://www.myhome247.co.uk/myhome247_kits.html

Edited by Matt Henson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
At least your wife and sister have a lock on the door to use. Forgetting to use it is a different matter. Does your sister live alone? Living with a man who travels a lot is different to a woman living alone permanently. People notice a woman living on her own - believe me, I had a lot of comments on why wasn't I married etc in my last house. It's also proven that most women are attacked by people they know (ie jealous ex-boyfriends) or by stalkers than random burglars/strangers. I would like to know that the house I am living in could withstand more than 3 seconds of a silent break-in if I was unlucky enough to attract the attention of a stalker. I am not asking for a landlord to keep up to date on the latest security requirements, just adhere to the basics and what a standard insurance company requires. That is not asking a lot.

Have you any reason whatsoever to believe you are being stalked by a nutty ex-boyfriend/ stranger who is obsessed by you? If so, go to the police. If not, you have just said that it's rare for women to be attacked by strangers; don't you think you are getting things out of proportion? My instinct is that you have a low worry threshold and if the doors were fixed to your satisfaction ( always remembering what Matt said about people getting in - nobody is going to walk up your drive waving a crowbar,; it will fit very neatly down the side of a coat and can be whipped out and used within seconds) you would just transfer your worries to something else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Have you any reason whatsoever to believe you are being stalked by a nutty ex-boyfriend/ stranger who is obsessed by you? If so, go to the police. If not, you have just said that it's rare for women to be attacked by strangers; don't you think you are getting things out of proportion? My instinct is that you have a low worry threshold and if the doors were fixed to your satisfaction ( always remembering what Matt said about people getting in - nobody is going to walk up your drive waving a crowbar,; it will fit very neatly down the side of a coat and can be whipped out and used within seconds) you would just transfer your worries to something else.

Completely wrong. When I last rented for a period of 5 years (two properties) never needed to speak to the agent/landlord once in that time about anything. Never had any complaints. But then those houses had a basic level of security nowhere near comparable to now. So no, I would not transfer my worries to anything else and no, I don't think I'm getting anything out of proportion. I just want a 17 year old UPVC door upgraded to meet basic security requirements so I can sleep at night.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just want a 17 year old UPVC door upgraded to meet basic security requirements so I can sleep at night.

Dream on... you want a LL to spend thousands for an over paranoid woman... what planet do you live on?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dream on... you want a LL to spend thousands for an over paranoid woman... what planet do you live on?

I live on Earth, where it certainly doesn't cost thousands to replace two UPVC doors and install a window lock. Would also prefer to keep comments like "paranoid" out of the equation seeing as that's subjective and also completely irrelevant. What's "over paranoid" to you might not be paranoid to another person. Didn't seem paranoid to the locksmith especially as he said most insurance companies insist on three locking points on an external door. Mine has zero locking points.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Completely wrong. When I last rented for a period of 5 years (two properties) never needed to speak to the agent/landlord once in that time about anything. Never had any complaints. But then those houses had a basic level of security nowhere near comparable to now. So no, I would not transfer my worries to anything else and no, I don't think I'm getting anything out of proportion. I just want a 17 year old UPVC door upgraded to meet basic security requirements so I can sleep at night.

However, from your previous topic:

Am just cautious as in my last place I had drug dealing and people having sex all going on in my passageway and street. Then someone s**t right in front of my back gate which I had to clear up. Then a drug dealer moved in next door for a while. After five years of that it takes a while to try and lose the paranoia!

and

I also experienced more than one incident of dodgy people hanging around the back of my last house which was in a dodgy area,

Not clear whether these are the same or different places.

So you did have complaints about other things. Nowhere's perfect!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I live on Earth, where it certainly doesn't cost thousands to replace two UPVC doors and install a window lock. Would also prefer to keep comments like "paranoid" out of the equation seeing as that's subjective and also completely irrelevant. What's "over paranoid" to you might not be paranoid to another person. Didn't seem paranoid to the locksmith especially as he said most insurance companies insist on three locking points on an external door. Mine has zero locking points.

Hi Peridot,

I think you'll have to accept that if you want more security, you'll have to pay for it. When I rented out my old house (I'd moved to another town) the tenants asked if they could put another lock on the front door, as there was only a Yale lock which was theoretically possible to access by breaking the small frosted window in the door and reaching through to turn it. I wasn't worried about it when I lived there (on my own) but was happy for the tenants to put the lock on as long as they paid for it and made sure the agents had a copy of the key. They had the lock put on at their own expense and were happy with that.

I don't think there is any "minimum" standard of security when it comes to insurance - but if your home doesn't have very good security you'll end up paying more for contents insurance. For example, here's the AA's list of approved locks:

https://www.theaa.com/services/insuranceand.../home/help.html

If you scroll down to "Minimum security", you'll see the list. I answered "No" to nearly all those questions as I wasn't sure what locks the house had before I moved it and they still covered me. I can see why you'd want more security and I think I'd want better locks if I were in your shoes, but I think you'll also have to accept that you'll have to pay for it. Ask the agent to ask the LL if it's okay for you to have better locks put on the door - I'm sure he'll be happy for you to do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I live on Earth, where it certainly doesn't cost thousands to replace two UPVC doors and install a window lock. Would also prefer to keep comments like "paranoid" out of the equation seeing as that's subjective and also completely irrelevant. What's "over paranoid" to you might not be paranoid to another person. Didn't seem paranoid to the locksmith especially as he said most insurance companies insist on three locking points on an external door. Mine has zero locking points.

As mentioned earlier, insurance rated locking points having nothing to do with your security and everything to do with protecting your posessions so that they don't have to pay for them if they get stollen, that is why you get a discount for higher security.

Secondly it is not an expected standard for a house, a rent property should be basically secure as it was determined in 1985, which means a mechansim to lock the doors so that you can just walk up and open them. There is no obligation for a LL to offer anything else at his/her expense.

Sorry but your behaviour is most definitely over sensitive if not paranoid, you may have had a bad experince making your behaviour entirely justified but you can not expect a LL to meet your demands based on what your deem required from your bad experience. A LL need only comply with the law

The only time a LL needs to replace a door under S11 of the 1985 LTA is if it is not fit for purpose i.e. does not open/close lets in big drafts or is rotten. If the locks lock it meets all the requirement of the law regardless of how effective they are.

Replacing 2 doors is about £2000 worth of work as they need new frames for the pins of the lock to engage...

As I said early you rent on an "as seen" basis, there is no requirement to keep an older house up to modern standards except to provide house that is wind and water tight and has working heating and sanitation.

I am not sure you can take any further action other than severly damaging the relationship between you and your LL which could be used to your advantage particularly if they live locally, if the locals are looking out for you as they do if you get close to them, then you will feel more secure. If you wind up the LL you will no doubt turn the village against you and lose the support you clearly desire.

One thing I can assure youis.... legal action will get you nowhere extremely fast

Edited by Matt Henson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
However, from your previous topic:

Am just cautious as in my last place I had drug dealing and people having sex all going on in my passageway and street. Then someone s**t right in front of my back gate which I had to clear up. Then a drug dealer moved in next door for a while. After five years of that it takes a while to try and lose the paranoia!

and

I also experienced more than one incident of dodgy people hanging around the back of my last house which was in a dodgy area,

Not clear whether these are the same or different places.

So you did have complaints about other things. Nowhere's perfect!

You need to check your facts. In my last place, I was an owner-occupier. I lived in a dodgy area for 6 years on my own and managed but I never felt unsafe inside my house as I had two or three locks on the door, a chain and an alarm - I only ever felt safe when outside the house or in the garden. I rented last in 1998 for a period of 5 years which was when I had no complaints and had no reason to contact the landlord. I cannot understand why landlords are so reluctant to shell out on something that puts their tenants at ease and ultimately improves the property.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You need to check your facts. In my last place, I was an owner-occupier. I lived in a dodgy area for 6 years on my own and managed but I never felt unsafe inside my house as I had two or three locks on the door, a chain and an alarm - I only ever felt safe when outside the house or in the garden. I rented last in 1998 for a period of 5 years which was when I had no complaints and had no reason to contact the landlord. I cannot understand why landlords are so reluctant to shell out on something that puts their tenants at ease and ultimately improves the property.

Peridot, please spend £2000 because I say so.... it won't add any value to your asset but I am telling you, you must do it..... Reasonable?

If you don't like it move out, that is the choice when you rent and the LL could have a tenant who isn't so worried and isn't going to cost him any money

Edited by Matt Henson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You need to check your facts. In my last place, I was an owner-occupier. I lived in a dodgy area for 6 years on my own and managed but I never felt unsafe inside my house as I had two or three locks on the door, a chain and an alarm - I only ever felt safe when outside the house or in the garden. I rented last in 1998 for a period of 5 years which was when I had no complaints and had no reason to contact the landlord. I cannot understand why landlords are so reluctant to shell out on something that puts their tenants at ease and ultimately improves the property.

Read my reply. I said "Not clear whether these are the same or different places"

LL are reluctant to shell out because every tenant has different priorities and the next tenant might find a plethora of locks a real nuisance. We've had tenants who wanted us to remove the electric cooker & replace with gas, followed by ones who didn't trust gas and wanted electric. Ones who wanted an extra fridge followed by ones who complained the kitchen was too cluttered with appliances. Ones who wanted an opening window in a ground floor bedroom followed by ones who said it was a security risk. You get the idea. Eventually you say "Sod it, this is what it comes with, it works, it's what you saw when you signed the contract. Live with it or fix it yourself" Most landlords DON'T make a huge profit on their rentals and an extra £1500 can well be the difference between profit/breakeven and loss.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Peridot, you only have the locksmiths word that your doors are unsafe, most double glazed upvc doors are very safe.

If you are really worried and before you strain the relationship with your landlord it may be worth asking the local police crime prevention officer for a visit, they are usually very happy to advise especially if you live alone, many offer free security measures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 399 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.