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Can Someone Explain The Lure Of City Centre Living?...

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I mean especially in the UK with violent crime on the up and a culture of binge drinking. Why would anyone choose to put themselves amongst that, and pay good money for the privilege? An abode should be that place to which we can retire when we wish to distance ourselves from the maddening crowd.

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I mean especially in the UK with violent crime on the up and a culture of binge drinking. Why would anyone choose to put themselves amongst that, and pay good money for the privilege? An abode should be that place to which we can retire when we wish to distance ourselves from the maddening crowd.

Where I live there has been a load of "luxury flats, penthouses and townhouses" built by a smelly river, gasworks and an old shipyard, not to mention the shopping developement that turned into a white elephant quicker than I could sink a bottle of rose after a shift. Guess what, the majority of them are for sale or rent! Amazing!

Actually I have had almost a bottle of rose. It was a long shift.

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I mean especially in the UK with violent crime on the up and a culture of binge drinking. Why would anyone choose to put themselves amongst that, and pay good money for the privilege? An abode should be that place to which we can retire when we wish to distance ourselves from the maddening crowd.

Real city centre, ie in the city centre. They allow you to walk to work which means no car which means £3k odd saved for the average jo with the average car. It also means a 20m walk to work instead of a 1h drive.

It is also safer, yes safer. Being on the 3rd / 4th and even 2nd floor means you are less likely to get burgled or to have your window smashed in.

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It might mean you save 3k a year not running a car but isn't living in the city centre a lot more costly? I don't see there's any real financial benefit. The lure of city living is a media manufactured dream. A prime example of this was the "easy like sunday morning" adverts in the 1980s featuring a right-on youthful lad living an ideal life in his city centre loft apartment. Lifestyles are constantly pushed that were once the preserve of bohemian hippies who occupied old factories or office buildings in city centres. Somehow this image was adopted, sanitised, repackaged and then fed back to the masses as desirable - all for the wrong reasons.

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It might mean you save 3k a year not running a car but isn't living in the city centre a lot more costly? I don't see there's any real financial benefit. The lure of city living is a media manufactured dream. A prime example of this was the "easy like sunday morning" adverts in the 1980s featuring a right-on youthful lad living an ideal life in his city centre loft apartment. Lifestyles are constantly pushed that were once the preserve of bohemian hippies who occupied old factories or office buildings in city centres. Somehow this image was adopted, sanitised, repackaged and then fed back to the masses as desirable - all for the wrong reasons.

if you can cut out the car and cut down the travel distance it is a big advantage.

a couple with 2 cars would save closer to £6k which should more than make up the rent difference.

as for more costly living, no not really. gas/electric/food doesn't discriminate on where you live. the only two would be council tax and rent.

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10-15 years ago when I was in my late teens/early twenties, it would have been great.

No taxi fares home, city centre shops, work only a short walk away - an absolute dream. However, what is attractive when one is 19 and when one is 34 (as I am now) is different. I want nobody upstairs from me, I want to live in a quiet neighbourhood, I want somewhere to park my car.

If I could have a city centre flat to crash in after a night out, great. But I only live 2 miles away from the city centre now in a 2-bed shoebox house with gardens and a drive at a price that cost up to £100,000 less than in Newcastle city centre during the boom, so I don't think I'd swap.

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as surprising as it is to some, many people have no interest in "a garden to plonk around in," dreary suburban landscapes, or living an hour from work.

it really is just a difference of opinion.

it's like asking "why don't some people like blue?"

they just don't

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as surprising as it is to some, many people have no interest in "a garden to plonk around in," dreary suburban landscapes, or living an hour from work.

it really is just a difference of opinion.

it's like asking "why don't some people like blue?"

they just don't

I was thinking more tree lined avenues, and abundant greenery.

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for me right now, renting one room in an apartment, its just so easy.

I can walk to work in 20 minutes, healthy and no boring comute, no petrol, no parking charges. No taxis needed, no planning needed to go out anywhere.

Appartment is tiny, but im hardly ever here, its just a place to sleep and chill a bit. Almost heats itself in winter with neighbours below and both sides. heating hasnt been on here in months.

I have no interest in a garden, there are acres of public gardens if i feel like a stroll (and i never do), i can be standing in a mountain range from here in an hour outside of peak driving, i have no interest in planting flowers or growing veg.

summary, its cheap, its easy.

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I was thinking more tree lined avenues, and abundant greenery.

thats even worse.

trees mean lots of raking, and greenery sounds like hedge trimming/weed pulling.

suburban houses take a lot of effort to properly maintain, commutes take a lot of time unless you are lucky enough to still be close.

if someone offered me the choice of pulling weeds on my weekend or going to a museum, gallery, bar, music venue etc etc etc, the choice isn't too hard.

luckily so many people like living in the suburbs, or prices in the city would be even higher than they are now.

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if someone offered me the choice of pulling weeds on my weekend or going to a museum, gallery, bar, music venue etc etc etc, the choice isn't too hard.

In other words, the stuff that costs a fortune!

I love the countryside, far better sense of community, good, freindly locals, I enjoy doing the gardening, and am looking forward to bring my children up in a rural environment, away from the distractions of the city. If they choose to live there, subsequently, so be it, but speaking for myself, I consider myself a more rounded individual growing up in the sticks.

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It might mean you save 3k a year not running a car but isn't living in the city centre a lot more costly?

It certainly is if the only food shops you have access to are Sainsburys Local and Tesco Express, or - god forbid - M&S. That's the main thing that puts me off the idea of city centre living - no car, great, but what about the weekly food shop?

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It certainly is if the only food shops you have access to are Sainsburys Local and Tesco Express, or - god forbid - M&S. That's the main thing that puts me off the idea of city centre living - no car, great, but what about the weekly food shop?

You could also get a job that supplies a company car, do what my mate did which was got the most basic model he could... meant he actually got paid extra each month.

I get some cash for milage, covers mine and the missus cars, MOT and fuel costs wise (both diesels).

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I mean especially in the UK with violent crime on the up and a culture of binge drinking. Why would anyone choose to put themselves amongst that, and pay good money for the privilege? An abode should be that place to which we can retire when we wish to distance ourselves from the maddening crowd.

Yes its about avoiding hours of commuting (each way).

This also explains why London prices will not lose so much as other places.

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It might mean you save 3k a year not running a car but isn't living in the city centre a lot more costly? I don't see there's any real financial benefit. The lure of city living is a media manufactured dream. A prime example of this was the "easy like sunday morning" adverts in the 1980s featuring a right-on youthful lad living an ideal life in his city centre loft apartment. Lifestyles are constantly pushed that were once the preserve of bohemian hippies who occupied old factories or office buildings in city centres. Somehow this image was adopted, sanitised, repackaged and then fed back to the masses as desirable - all for the wrong reasons.

you'd think inner city living would least mean plenty of amenitiesbut all the 24 hour suipermarkets are in the suburbs as are most things like sports centres and swimming pools

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Thought I would put in my two pence worth to defend the idea of living in a city and hopefully explain why so many of us do it! I'm 25 and live in the centre of Manchester in a large 1-bed place in a converted mill. Renting at the moment but when the time's right to buy I'd probably opt for something like the place I live in now.

Suburban/rural living does have its appeal, but isn't right for me at the moment.

Why do I like living here?

It's fun. There's a ton of shops, bars, galleries, museums and restaurants just outside the front door. Despite what someone posted, the museums and galleries are free - and as for restaurants I have the choice of eating for £5 or £50 depending on what I fancy, so it's not necessarily expensive on that front. Great transport links for local, national and international destinations, making it easy to get out of the city whenever I like.

The building I live in is very well managed, hardly ever hear anything from the neighbours and have never been broken into (or mugged/stabbed/murdered etc).

It's really, really cheap. The rent is fairly steep in terms of square footage from an equivalent place out in the country, but the cost savings in other areas are substantial - primarily stemming from the fact that I can walk to work (15 minutes each way) and don't need/want to own a car.

In my opinion the quality of life I enjoy couldn't be maintained if I moved out of the city. I'd have a longer journey to work, would probably need to get a car and would be further from friends. At the moment I also manage to put just over a third of my salary into savings - there's no way I could maintain that if I moved out without compromising on other things that I enjoy - eating out, socialising and so on.

Edited by stardotboy

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Guest sillybear2
if you can cut out the car and cut down the travel distance it is a big advantage.

a couple with 2 cars would save closer to £6k which should more than make up the rent difference.

You assume the only thing they want to do is walk to work, what happends if you want to go to another city, carry a load of shopping or see your friends in a little village? Beg Mr Beeching to change his mind?

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No commuting has to be at the top of the list.

In addition, you get the vibrancy of the city centre.

Its important to note that in London, for example, most of the knifings etc.. occur in boroughs like Tower Hamlets, east part of Haringey, Lambeth, Lewisham, Southwark and Croydon.

The actual centre is pretty safe - It does have a higher crime rate that say Kingston, but this is in the context of a transient population of upwards of 5 million. Which means it actually pretty safe.

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I mean especially in the UK with violent crime on the up and a culture of binge drinking. Why would anyone choose to put themselves amongst that, and pay good money for the privilege? An abode should be that place to which we can retire when we wish to distance ourselves from the maddening crowd.

its part of the whole 'ladder' marketing ploy.

your supposed to get a 'city lifestyle pad' for 3 years before reaching success and buying your next property (a 2 bed town house) while then using your city pad as a btl investment as part of your 'portfolio'.

topped with lots of high end images of lifestyle action. so far its mostly only attracted greedy investors.

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I live in Canary Wharf and love it.

Wife and I both work variously in the City and the Wharf. 15 minute stroll along the river along pedestrian roads is a fairly civilised way to get to work. We have more shops than we can shake a stick at right on our doorstep, plenty of variety of supermarkets (Waitrose, Tescos, M&S) and a huge variety of niche and specialist suppliers that you don't get outside the city.

We live in a very nice block therefore our neighbours are very civilised - no problems with noise or nonesense. We have a car that we use periodically to get about if we want to go further afield. Car is kept in a secure underground carpark and being not-ground level means we can leave our balcony doors and our floor-to-ceiling windows open all day and night without significant risk.

All of our rooms face onto the river so we have absolutely no road noise. In fact, when we first moved in I slept through till lunchtime - I used to always wake up early before we moved from the country with all the background noise. Fairly entertaining in summer with the party boats, but sitting on the balcony watching them go by is a nice way to spend the evening.

We have lots of green space less than 2 minutes walk away. Granted it's not "ours" but neither is the maintenance or upkeep.

There are dozens and dozens of museums, restaurants, bars, libraries, gyms, sailing clubs, sports clubs, walking groups, study groups, evening classes, friends, etc. etc. etc. within moment of where we live.

We used to live in the country but chose to move into the city. Very much a personal lifestyle choice - emphasis on the personal.

It won't suit us forever, in the same way that it doesn't suit other people at all. Our 1st baby is due shortly so within a year or so we'll move a bit further out. But for the time being it is exactly what we want.

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I mean especially in the UK with violent crime on the up and a culture of binge drinking. Why would anyone choose to put themselves amongst that, and pay good money for the privilege? An abode should be that place to which we can retire when we wish to distance ourselves from the maddening crowd.

From personal experience living in a house in gated new build estate in a city centre

1. Living in walking distance (150 meters) from the train station

2. Being in the city centre, no need to drive

3. Walking to and from the pubs, parks, river, super market, restaurants, cinema all within 500m

4. Friends being on the door step all in walking distance 200m->1km

5. Having a garage/parking in the city centre

6. Privacy in a city centre in the back garden, but the ability to sit on the lounge balcony and watch the city go by

7. Did I mention not needing to use the car? :P

8. A gated estate nice and safe on the inside, safer than most estates in a city centre with council CCTV cameras on the edges on the estate/police/people etc

9. All the council tax you pay gets used on your doorstep, better value for money, police walking the beat, police station 400m, fire station 600m away

10. Better class of neighbours, bars/clubs/chavs are about 300m away over a couple of roads/buildings, close enough but far enough away

Edited by moosetea

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This also explains why London prices will not lose so much as other places.

What! You're not allowed to say things like on here!

Fellow HPC'ers lets burn him. burn him.

(but OK we better weight him first just to make sure he/she is heavier than a duck a-la life of Brian).

:rolleyes:

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What! You're not allowed to say things like on here!

Fellow HPC'ers lets burn him. burn him.

(but OK we better weight him first just to make sure he/she is heavier than a duck a-la life of Brian).

:rolleyes:

And therefore made of wood?

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  • 395 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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