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ripandcap

Btl Vs Pension

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As the title say.

Would you:

1) Just put your money away in a pension fund and get tax relief on it.

or

2) Pay tax on your money and invest in btl (obviously at the right time, right yield etc).

Or of course any other views welcome?

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And some of the criteria for a weathly husband would be assets like, property, pensions and savings.

Good luck in your search but I have noticed that after the recent divorce rulings wealthy chaps are not interested in marriage unless they want to commit financial suicide.

Edited by ralphmalph

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Where is the option for:

#Cybernetics (therefore you never need to stop working),

and oh Suicide too,

As most of my peers who work have so little left at the end of the month and they live like students sans the booze, they can't save anything significant, and some are completely crazy in thinking the £10 a month they are putting away to their pensions will get them £15K in their pension pots.

If I have a fair amount of money when I'm old I'll change all my worn out body parts, if I have nothing (which I am on a course to achieve) its motorbike into concrete bridge support at 172mph jobbie.

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Cash ISA. Provided Broon doesnt scrap them the day before he gets lynched. :lol:

Provided you have the full £3600 available on April 6th every year.

Anyone with a STR fund could be doing this anyway.

Youre money is all yours when you retire and is tax free.

As opposed to funding L&G's (for example) bonus round every year, without ever seeing a return.

I kinda like that....

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And some of the criteria for a weathly husband would be assets like, property, pensions and savings.

Good luck in your search but I have noticed that after the recent divorce rulings wealthy chaps are not interested in marriage unless they want to commite financial suicide.

Correctitude.

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I agree about not putting all your eggs in one basket but... I stopped paying into a pension about 5 years ago and will only start again in the next year or two once the crash has happened. I wish I had the ability to move my current pension into cash a few years back as well but that ain't allowed. I think personally that the markets are going to go to unexpected depths in the coming crash.

Longer-term, I think you need a mix of a property - home or btl - a pension and some share investments. Not having all your eggs in one basket.

If I was 20 or 30 again and knew what I know now I would have ignored the pension and put all my money into my home - whether we had a bubble or not - as the people I know who did this (They all had parents who were self-employed and wiser than me.) basically paid their mortgages off by the time they were 40 and now can put all their free cash into pensions.

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I agree about not putting all your eggs in one basket but... I stopped paying into a pension about 5 years ago and will only start again in the next year or two once the crash has happened. I wish I had the ability to move my current pension into cash a few years back as well but that ain't allowed. I think personally that the markets are going to go to unexpected depths in the coming crash.

Longer-term, I think you need a mix of a property - home or btl - a pension and some share investments. Not having all your eggs in one basket.

If I was 20 or 30 again and knew what I know now I would have ignored the pension and put all my money into my home - whether we had a bubble or not - as the people I know who did this (They all had parents who were self-employed and wiser than me.) basically paid their mortgages off by the time they were 40 and now can put all their free cash into pensions.

It is chicken and egg though, Because if someone starts a pension at 20 then 15 years later 75% of the final value has been assured (assuming decent returns and no Equitable life issues). So the choice when young is in the early years provide some income for you old age and then stop paying into a pension as you did and use the money to pay off the mortgage or the other way around. I think that the outcome will be the samein both cases.

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I agree about not putting all your eggs in one basket but... I stopped paying into a pension about 5 years ago and will only start again in the next year or two once the crash has happened. I wish I had the ability to move my current pension into cash a few years back as well but that ain't allowed. I think personally that the markets are going to go to unexpected depths in the coming crash.

Longer-term, I think you need a mix of a property - a pension and some share investments. Not having all your eggs in one basket.

If I was 20 or 30 again and knew what I know now I would have ignored the pension and put all my money into my home - whether we had a bubble or not - as the people I know who did this (They all had parents who were self-employed and wiser than me.) basically paid their mortgages off by the time they were 40 and now can put all their free cash into pensions.

MT I would agree...some cash in tax free high interest savings. In a place to live, paying an affordable repayment mortgage to provide a roof and some security for your family, value is irrelevant. If you have anything left over in quality blue chip stocks/shares that are not over indebted, you use yourself are well run and bear well for the future.

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Guest happy?
Brutally honest, no one under fifty is likely to "retire" in the old human financial sense, as nanotechnological cell repair makes us perfect eighteen year-olds again, and machine intelligence supercedes and replaces human beings anyway. Where that leaves us? :unsure:

Unable to tpye?

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Brutally honest, no one under fifty is likely to "retire" in the old human financial sense, as nanotechnological cell repair makes us perfect eighteen year-olds again, and machine intelligence supercedes and replaces human beings anyway. Where that leaves us? :unsure:

if machines replace us, ie we develop true AI then we will not have to work at all. everything would be provided to us for free. It would be like having slaves, perhaps morally wrong even if they are machines. but this is the ultimate aim of technology and productivity.

as for non ageing, might happen but its going to be v.dificult if not impossible. most living things are limited to 100 years. some plants can do 500 or so but there are limits. i would have assumed if immortality was even remotely possible then one of the billions of plants or animals over billions of years would have got some way to it. (ie living 10,000 years +)

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Brutally honest, no one under fifty is likely to "retire" in the old human financial sense, as nanotechnological cell repair makes us perfect eighteen year-olds again, and machine intelligence supercedes and replaces human beings anyway. Where that leaves us? :unsure:

What is retirement any how...to sit on a chair to vegitate at 65 :ph34r: ...and if not what can we do to see that 50 years of hard work bringing up kids & paying taxes bears fruit for the future? ;)

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These are biological limits. Nanotechnology is total, perfect control at the atomic level. A "repaired" person would be indistinguishable from a perfectly healthy teenage Olympian.

i dont see it with my lifetime.

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Cells you should definitely read this book. It was a seminal work - genius really - and is (I think still) available online.

http://www.e-drexler.com/d/06/00/EOC/EOC_T...f_Contents.html

He actually mentions that objection. If you think about it, logically, for at least one generation it will not be true.

bookmarked, will take a look at it

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  • 396 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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