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ken_ichikawa

Should I Go Back In To Work Monday?.

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Should I go back in to work Monday?. I cleaned out my desk before I left so there is no need to go back....

A whole week of bosses avoiding me and Friday 1pm - 5pm I get a mother of all bollocking from all of the bosses and I'm told to come back Monday to work under somebody mid level to be put up to standard last chance they say , I wasn't really phased and sat there with my poker face.

It is tempered by:

"you are young and inexperienced we can train you up to be a good accountant" (I'm 28)

But I don't want to be an accountant....

I've been feeling horribly demoralised the last few months and subsequently my billing and work quality have taken a walk off a cliff.

The if you save up for several week you can buy a beer, pay 'increase' , I'm always promised lots whenever I start a new job work it for a year and your pay will increase substantially, it never happens the first 12 months I worked pretty hard billed always above target and got my jobs in on time even if it meant staying behind after closing time or taking work home.

Should I go back ? ,

Since I'm abandoning accountancy in the near future anyway because it is low paid even when you get qualified 75% of fully qualified types get stuck forever at 23000ish, approx 5 years of work down the toilet....for £16700 PA gross (about £1050 a month). I obviously do not know the right people, but I'm not sure if extra money would make me stay since I don't enjoy the job at all its unrewarding , dull and you get moaned at an awful lot.

Originally I was going to sit tight for 10 more months and do 2 more exams and get my ACCA title , but I'm not sure if I want it.

Whats the alternative then?

My altenative work thought is to go back to university and go for a PCGE (Postgraduate Certificate in Education), which gives me credit towards my masters degree, and the government effectively pays for do that for a bit...... starting myself on 20K, then moving up from there. Work as a teacher for a bit get my masters and try get to college/university level by moving up to a doctorate.

Any thoughts?.

Thanks

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I don't know anyone who hasn't thought about changing his career at some stage or another.... usually brought on by a spate of unhappiness in his/her present role.

In your case, and for the sake of 10 months, I would stick at it so that at least you have at least one good, useful qualification under your belt. If you set yourself that as a goal, there will be a light at the end of the tunnel, which will make your circumstances more bearable.

When you have that, then think about a career change.... or going self employed.

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What you need my friend is to get a council estate scrubber pregnant, get yourself a free house, 15 hours part time work, some cash in hand work and all the benefits you can claim.

Should clear the best part of 35k then.

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Tell 'em to stuff it.

Feeling the same way myself. Different industry, but similar situation.

Even though we are heading into a recession and job security is highly sort, if you're unhappy, you're unhappy.

Just be sure to leave a huge log in a drawer in your bosses desk. Put a little flag in it if you're feeling patriotic.

Damn this Keo Brandy!

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I think Dubai's advice is good. Make the change to teaching after getting the qualification. But don't think it's going to be easy eventually getting in at University level. A PhD is the minimum requirement these days, and there's a lot of competition out there. A couple of published papers, or better still a book published would put you high up the list. And you'd probably be starting as low as 20oddK.

But if you're unhappy, anything is worth it to get out. I'm looking for a small business accountant at the moment, and I'm sure lots of others are. Why not give self-employed a go? There's going to be a lot of small outfits starting up, and needing their books and tax done, when the redundancies really start....

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hmmm - if i were you i'd finish off the ACCA - not only may it be useful in the future (like others say it would be useful for self employment) but think of all the time you have spent doing it going down the drain!

if you do decide on a total career switch then you will able to point out to a potential employer than you had the character to sit and flog through the exams, despite knowing that it really wasn't for you!

i do sympathise about the job you are in. there are a lot of terrible public practices out there - i have worked in some right cr#pholes in my time. :( the place i'm at now is OK'ish and i'm probably overpaid a bit if truth be told because i run (ha!) our IT as well.

why not move into industry? having said that i understand that vacancies have fallen off a cliff in the last few weeks - i have dark memories of the last recession - accountancy got hit really hard and training dried up so much that there was a shortage of accountants for years afterwards!

good luck

Edit - lousy formatting

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I found myself in a similar accountancy shit hole. In the end I decided to stick it out until I had finished my exams so at least I had a qualification to my name. I am now training as a Chartered Quantity Surveyor (day release 1 day a week to attend uni), earning more than I did in accountancy doing a job I enjoy. I would advise you to think long and hard about your next move and not make any rash decisions. If you really feel you need to change from your current employer, try to stick it out and find an alternative job / career or uni place before telling your boss to get stuffed. Unless you really can afford to tell your boss to get stuffed and to hell with the repercussions. Good luck in what ever you decide.

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Guest Skint Academic

Being happy in your job is very important, after all, there isn't much else to your day to day life and you get too tired in the evenings to do anything and there's not much to do at the weekends.

But remember that if you voluntarily leave work then you can't claim the dole. If you get the sack, get made redundant or your contract comes to an end then you can claim. It's just something to be aware of in case it takes longer to find a job than you think (as is the case with me).

Of course the catch is that if you get sacked then it may not look good as a reference. Maybe explain to them what you are feeling and explain that things aren't going to improve.

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Thanks for the replies.

I probably will finish off my ACCA and then go do something else, as I felt while being kept up awake all night last night thinking about it , 5 years work down the toilet if I don't finish it , and with it I suppose I lock in the qualification if I ever *shudder* decide to come back.

I don't want to go self employed even though you keep more of the money , I don't actually like the job at all, and I know self employed types just as stressed as they are personally responsible , the horrible irony is that the solution to such stress is to employ juniors and as various accountant forums state pay them next to nothing.

I feel that being put through the crusher like that myself why would I want to do that to somebody else?.

Also money isn't the prime issue, give me an extra £10K and I'll probably not stay, its the complete lack of satisfaction I derive from my job, the tedium of the work.

I do a motorbike repair

I fix something round the house,

I teach somebody to do something

I write an internet article

All of those things I do unpaid yet get a great deal more satisfaction from, such that I tend to read my articles over and over, for my repairs and fixes look at them now and again and think I did that..... I feel nothing for accounts type work, get it done and out of my sight ...

Call it rather corny if you want but some of the adverts the government portrays of teachers I think strike a chord in that I do remember all the great teachers who influenced my life.

Thanks again.

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A family member decided to become a teacher. He managed to get an A level in maths in 1 year which is hard enough if you're on the dole, he did it while working as a hgv mechanic. Then he did the teacher training course.

Proud as punch he started work as a teacher. 9 months later he was driving a coach for a living.

It's a tough question but is your current unease because of the job or because you are basically unhappy? If the latter, all jobs are going to be naff. Repairing machinery or writing articles for a living carries a greater weight than doing it for fun.

I'm wondering why they didn't simply fire you. Maybe they can see your potential and know that you're going through a bad time? The moment you start taking a pride in doing your work to the best of your ability, life gets better.

Check out 'How I raised Myself from Failure to Success in Selling' by Frank Bettger.

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I think Dubai's advice is good. Make the change to teaching after getting the qualification. But don't think it's going to be easy eventually getting in at University level. A PhD is the minimum requirement these days, and there's a lot of competition out there. A couple of published papers, or better still a book published would put you high up the list. And you'd probably be starting as low as 20oddK.

A PhD is not essential for a lecturer (equivalent of lecturer 'A' in an 'old' university) post in a post-92 institution (former polytechnic), but unless you have one you'll never be able to progress to somewhere better. I know former colleagues from when I worked at Teesside in that situation, who are fighting to get a PhD and some publications out while at the same time keeping up a full teaching load at a research-inactive institution (i.e. your teaching load assumes that you don't do any research). The only reason I was able to jump ship to a Russell Group university a couple of years ago is that I already had the PhD and worked on my first book during evenings, weekends and leave. All the other candidates on the shortlist for the job I'm in now had published at least one monograph, and some had two.

Many institutions will also demand that you have PGCLTHE (i.e. a higher ed PGCE, not a secondary school one). As many PhD studentship/teaching assistantship deals include doing the PGCLTHE as part of the deal, many newly minted PhDs are coming out already with this qualification, and I'm afraid that you'd be up against them.

For a full time lecturing post the salary is more like £25k, but many are fixed term these days, especially at entry level.

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Since I'm abandoning accountancy in the near future anyway because it is low paid even when you get qualified 75% of fully qualified types get stuck forever at 23000ish, approx 5 years of work down the toilet....for £16700 PA gross (about £1050 a month). I obviously do not know the right people, but I'm not sure if extra money would make me stay since I don't enjoy the job at all its unrewarding , dull and you get moaned at an awful lot.

Hi Kennichi

I think we've discussed this before but believe me, even in the North West very few qualified accountants would work for £23k pa - certainly not for a full time position. Why don't you look at the salary surveys on the Hays website. I recruit in the Lancashire area (industry not practice) so have some idea of the types and backgrounds of candidates at different payrates. Could you give us some more details of your qualifications and experience? Got to dash out now but will look for the thread later.

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I found myself in a similar accountancy shit hole. In the end I decided to stick it out until I had finished my exams so at least I had a qualification to my name. I am now training as a Chartered Quantity Surveyor (day release 1 day a week to attend uni), earning more than I did in accountancy doing a job I enjoy.

I've always been fascinated by Surveying, as it seems one of the easiest Jobs out there !!

How is the Surveying Industry doing right now ..... in a Property downturn is there more work for you guys or less ??

Would you consider the Exams to be tough and how long does it take to fully Qualify ??

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Hi Kennichi

I think we've discussed this before but believe me, even in the North West very few qualified accountants would work for £23k pa - certainly not for a full time position. Why don't you look at the salary surveys on the Hays website. I recruit in the Lancashire area (industry not practice) so have some idea of the types and backgrounds of candidates at different payrates. Could you give us some more details of your qualifications and experience? Got to dash out now but will look for the thread later.

They do , I've seen it first hand myself many many times,

Full partners in my last bullying work culture place were on little more due to when they left the work contracts out accidentally, plenty of fully qualified folk stuck at the ceiling. As said in other places collusion and outsourcing has caused pay to drop like a rock, hell we don't even do personal tax anymore, a min wage person scans in all the docs and sends it to India.

But as said its less of a money issue...

I just really loathe the job completely, its dull, uninspiring, uninteresting and I feel like a zombie.

Such that more money probably won't make a difference my job since auditing function has been effectively passed to one team and I'm left doing accounts.

Which means box arrives on desk , I convert this to a set of accounts , get moaned at , raise a bill , then another box arrives on my desk , repeat ad infinitum.......... I stay as an accountant more than 10 months its going to be the same thing every day for the next 40 years I certainly don't want that.

Somebody once did say to me just do your job take the money and find something to enjoy outside of work, I did , I went motorbike touring (from funds raised elsewhere) in Spain for 2 weeks, came back and got into trouble such that I feel I can't leave my work behind ever, getting ambushed at 415pm with an urgent project when your ferry leaves in 7 hours with a 6 hour motorway trip to get there isn't funny. Ah yes its a simple job really then given a set of accounts with 32 million of turn over a book keeper who claims VAT on VAT , and posts randomly to sage wherever she feels like it ....ugh...

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A PhD is not essential for a lecturer (equivalent of lecturer 'A' in an 'old' university) post in a post-92 institution (former polytechnic), but unless you have one you'll never be able to progress to somewhere better.

Post-92 universities with ambitions to go up the league tables are increasingly intent on all their academics either having a PhD already, or currently doing one.

I know, because it was one of the factors that made me decide to leave a full time senior lecturing job, via a good severance deal. My three close colleagues, with 60 plus years of uni teaching experience between them, and invaluable relevant industry experience, found themselves reluctantly signing on for PhD research, as well as their normal teaching load. My financial circumstances allowed me to decline studying for a qualification which I would complete in the same year that I retired!

This insistence on research doesn't suit all disciplines, by a long chalk, and the decline in student contact hours it invariably entails will be an increasing source of complaint from both students and parents as fees inevitably rise.

There may be a few backwater places that don't see research as the gold standard, but all you need is an ambitious Vice Chancellor at the helm with an eye on research grants and the league tables, and a PhD will be a standard requirement when recruiting new staff.

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They do , I've seen it first hand myself many many times,

Fine, but when I've advertised (press and agencies) for management accountants in the NW, and been interested in people approaching qualification, I would get pretty much no responses at £27.5k, and hardly an avalanche of CV's at £30k. Why didn't these colleagues of yours apply? Otherwise move to London/ South East - even now there is no shortage of work.

But as said its less of a money issue...

I just really loathe the job completely, its dull, uninspiring, uninteresting and I feel like a zombie.

I quite understand - accounts prep would drive me insane - I've never known a more irritating activity. There are plenty of other jobs you could do without wasting your qualifications to date. Work in industry, work as a QS on non specialist projects, business process management, the list goes on. If you want an easier life theres always the audit commission or local government.

Which means box arrives on desk , I convert this to a set of accounts , get moaned at , raise a bill , then another box arrives on my desk , repeat ad infinitum.......... I stay as an accountant more than 10 months its going to be the same thing every day for the next 40 years I certainly don't want that.

Again, accounts prep is a crap job - believe me, very few qualified accountants do it unless in the process of starting their own firms. I'm not quite sure I follow your thought process - why do you need to stay in your current job to qualify? You could quit on Monday and carry on with the exams - if you need a bit more experience to gain the qualification just find it somewhere. Many people start in practice and move into industry or different workstreams. You dont need to continue with what you are doing to qualify. Its irrelevent and - lets be frank - pretty limited experience in any case. Given you don't earn much you don't even have to worry about loss of potential income.

Maybe a career change is what you need, but there are plenty of other options which must be worth a go for a year first. Buy a new suit, polish your shoes and visit Hays, Robert Half and Michael Page. Temping might be a good start to see if you can find a better working environment.

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I know little or nothing of accountancy, thank the lord, but your bosses sound like a right miserable bunch of bullies. I feel it is time for some lucrative, and enjoyable pay-back:

1. Call in sick Monday morning, sob a little and just say you are finding it difficult to cope with stress. Make sure you say you will visit the GP asap;

2. Call the GP and get a non-urgent appointment, probably a few days later;

3. See the GP, pour out your heart (over-egg) about stress, depression and bullying bosses. He or she will sign you off a week or so. Mention the words "black moods" and "suicide" or "sometimes, eg when riding my motorbike at high speed, I feel like I can't go on". A good GP MUST then refer you to the local NHS psychologist for urgent intervention counselling and he will prescribe anti-depressants. It is up to you if you take them, but go buy them;

4. Watch out for private detectives, hired by your evil employer, secretly filming you doing Macdonald's childrens' parties dressed as Ronald the clown, while you are off sick;

5. If they try to bully you or harass you into returning at all, applying undue pressure or coercion, just threaten them with an employment tribunal claim under the DDA 1995 (stress/depression is classified as a disability for the purposes of the act) and watch them melt away;

6. Enjoy your time at home on full pay for a while, finish your ACCA exams and then resign. Screw those bosses and their boxes piling high on your desk;

7. Once qualified, go self-employed - you strike me as a sensitive soul who could enjoy doing the books for charity shops, or motorcycling repair companies etc. Whoever you work for, employ a book-keeper to do all the boring prep stuff (these will be easy to get cheaply during the recession) and swan around on your motorbike delivering fat invoices to clients. Work from home to start, save overheads, make your own website, get some decent business cards made and nobody knows how small you are.

I hate bullying bosses more than anything. I used to be a Trade Union rep and ran a number of successful employment tribunal cases, it must be even easier now with all the new laws - if your bosses install cheap "rough" toilet paper you can probably bring a claim now.

Good luck! I too had some career crises like yours and ended up in the windies. Just remember that you may dislike your work now, but it is completely different when any effort you put in is ALL for you, and no bugger tells you what to do.

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The wrong people as your bosses can make your life miserable. I once had a boss who was properly mad and after she accused me of contacting a client (I had no reason to have any contact with) saying something really bizarre I just couldn't go on. The whole place was a shambles and it was my first 'proper' job from uni after months of fruitless searching, I had to move to an unfamiliar region, so it was very depressing.

In my current job I'm under new people and while before I was admired for keeping on top of a lot of work single-handedly and always going over and above the call of duty the new people are disinterested unless they have some trivial nit-pick, a bit haughty, and from what I can work out lazy, turning their roles into sinecures with no one noticing. Not as bad as that previous experiences but I don't work with the same verve due to it and wouldn't mind a change.

Most managers these days seem to be there by default as all the dynamic people moved on and they eased into these positions. Some have no people or personal skills, no communication, are moody when their bosses are on their back and idle when they're not. I don't love my job but I take the philosophy if you're stuck there for 8 or more hours a day, you may as well get stuck in - that's hard in a poor environment.

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I've always been fascinated by Surveying, as it seems one of the easiest Jobs out there !!

How is the Surveying Industry doing right now ..... in a Property downturn is there more work for you guys or less ??

Would you consider the Exams to be tough and how long does it take to fully Qualify ??

If it was so easy surely there would not be a shortage of qualified Chartered Quantity Surveyors :unsure: Business is good at the moment lots of UK and European projects the largest of which will take a decade to complete. We have a wide mixture of projects new build, refit and renovation, demolition and extension. The main sectors we work in are distribution centres, headquarters, office, industrial, warehouse, healthcare and public sector. The construction industry is fairly busy, despite the massive problems being experienced by silly drowning in debt house builders. We have seen an increase in the requirement for our services as the banks are no longer willing to throw money at any fool who thinks they can build commercial / industrial premises and charge a fortune in rent and make a killing. The banks now want to see proper cost planning and estimates, not the back of a fag packet on a wing and prayer guesses that would have been sufficient in the days of lax lending. Also banks and solicitors / lawyers want to see the bills of quantities and pretend to understand how they are put together and how the pricing of different tenders is made up. Along with adding and amending various clauses in the JCT contracts and generally play a collective game of bargepole in an attempt to find a scapegoat to sue should something go wrong. The BSc course I am doing on day release takes 5 years to complete and cover topics such as construction technology, environmental design, ICT and surveying, built environment law, construction management and economics, production economics, management and resource planning, construction law and expenditure planning and control. Once I have passed the BSc I plan to undertake a postgraduate course in construction law and dispute resolution. So far I have found the exams to be tougher and more challenging than I had expected.

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They do , I've seen it first hand myself many many times,

Full partners in my last bullying work culture place were on little more due to when they left the work contracts out accidentally, plenty of fully qualified folk stuck at the ceiling. As said in other places collusion and outsourcing has caused pay to drop like a rock, hell we don't even do personal tax anymore, a min wage person scans in all the docs and sends it to India.

But as said its less of a money issue...

I just really loathe the job completely, its dull, uninspiring, uninteresting and I feel like a zombie.

Such that more money probably won't make a difference my job since auditing function has been effectively passed to one team and I'm left doing accounts.

Which means box arrives on desk , I convert this to a set of accounts , get moaned at , raise a bill , then another box arrives on my desk , repeat ad infinitum.......... I stay as an accountant more than 10 months its going to be the same thing every day for the next 40 years I certainly don't want that.

Somebody once did say to me just do your job take the money and find something to enjoy outside of work, I did , I went motorbike touring (from funds raised elsewhere) in Spain for 2 weeks, came back and got into trouble such that I feel I can't leave my work behind ever, getting ambushed at 415pm with an urgent project when your ferry leaves in 7 hours with a 6 hour motorway trip to get there isn't funny. Ah yes its a simple job really then given a set of accounts with 32 million of turn over a book keeper who claims VAT on VAT , and posts randomly to sage wherever she feels like it ....ugh...

When I spoke to an accountancy agency in the North West prior to me re locating the lady I was dealing with told me she had ACCA qualified accountants who would work for £9 p/h. I laughed at her down the phone and told her there was no way I was getting out of bed for £9 p/h.

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If it was so easy surely there would not be a shortage of qualified Chartered Quantity Surveyors :unsure: Business is good at the moment lots of UK and European projects the largest of which will take a decade to complete. We have a wide mixture of projects new build, refit and renovation, demolition and extension. The main sectors we work in are distribution centres, headquarters, office, industrial, warehouse, healthcare and public sector. The construction industry is fairly busy, despite the massive problems being experienced by silly drowning in debt house builders. We have seen an increase in the requirement for our services as the banks are no longer willing to throw money at any fool who thinks they can build commercial / industrial premises and charge a fortune in rent and make a killing. The banks now want to see proper cost planning and estimates, not the back of a fag packet on a wing and prayer guesses that would have been sufficient in the days of lax lending. Also banks and solicitors / lawyers want to see the bills of quantities and pretend to understand how they are put together and how the pricing of different tenders is made up. Along with adding and amending various clauses in the JCT contracts and generally play a collective game of bargepole in an attempt to find a scapegoat to sue should something go wrong. The BSc course I am doing on day release takes 5 years to complete and cover topics such as construction technology, environmental design, ICT and surveying, built environment law, construction management and economics, production economics, management and resource planning, construction law and expenditure planning and control. Once I have passed the BSc I plan to undertake a postgraduate course in construction law and dispute resolution. So far I have found the exams to be tougher and more challenging than I had expected.

Interesting, thanks ..... when I said it seemed an easy Job, I meant from what I've seen personally of Surveyors ..... basically wondering around a property and checking a few boxes !!

What kind of money do fully qualified QC's earn ..... is there a large or small failure rate on your course ..... how much would your pay be be bumped up when you complete your Masters ??

I take it there is potentially a great deal of work available overseas so you get to travel if you want to ??

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Fine, but when I've advertised (press and agencies) for management accountants in the NW, and been interested in people approaching qualification, I would get pretty much no responses at £27.5k, and hardly an avalanche of CV's at £30k. Why didn't these colleagues of yours apply? Otherwise move to London/ South East - even now there is no shortage of work.

I quite understand - accounts prep would drive me insane - I've never known a more irritating activity. There are plenty of other jobs you could do without wasting your qualifications to date. Work in industry, work as a QS on non specialist projects, business process management, the list goes on. If you want an easier life theres always the audit commission or local government.

Again, accounts prep is a crap job - believe me, very few qualified accountants do it unless in the process of starting their own firms. I'm not quite sure I follow your thought process - why do you need to stay in your current job to qualify? You could quit on Monday and carry on with the exams - if you need a bit more experience to gain the qualification just find it somewhere. Many people start in practice and move into industry or different workstreams. You dont need to continue with what you are doing to qualify. Its irrelevent and - lets be frank - pretty limited experience in any case. Given you don't earn much you don't even have to worry about loss of potential income.

Maybe a career change is what you need, but there are plenty of other options which must be worth a go for a year first. Buy a new suit, polish your shoes and visit Hays, Robert Half and Michael Page. Temping might be a good start to see if you can find a better working environment.

I hadn't thought of it like that in that I didn't see these options or even know they existed I feel somewhat embarrased like a child not being able to see that they had options.

I'm not quite sure I follow your thought process - why do you need to stay in your current job to qualify? You could quit on Monday and carry on with the exams - if you need a bit more experience to gain the qualification just find it

I still need 9 more of the practical experience things before I can apply as a member , audit experience being the big one I keep getting rationed audit work which can only be gotten in practice.

I saw qualified accountants at FCCA/FCA level working in practice prepping (complex) accounts, and now and again going out on audit, and was always told by qualified types who were prepping accounts in practice environments this is what we do we're accountants....... deal with it.... :wacko:

I'd asked around on accountancy websites , :wacko:

I'd asked around people who opened up their own, :wacko:

I'd asked partners (possibly not the most reliable source of information) :wacko:

I'd been to gatherings of accountants to 'network' :wacko:

None of them gave me those sorts of options it was just accounts prep the occassional audit a smattering of tax and more accounts prep and I thought accounts prep this is going to be your working life as an accountant forever.......... I don't want to be prepping accounts for longer than I have to. I did used to get really stuck in and billed plenty, but constant accounts prep wore me down badly....

Regarding the SE I don't want to live in London, I lived there before in Archway, I lived in a tiny box of a flat no bigger than a large single bed and paid an arm and a leg for it.

Thanks for giving me some good advice , its hard to find especially since I keep getting it off those with vested interests (ie partners who tell you that you have no options and therefore must work under them forever), it is greatly appreciated I feel alot better.

:D

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I still need 9 more of the practical experience things before I can apply as a member , audit experience being the big one I keep getting rationed audit work which can only be gotten in practice.

I'm not sure I follow this? I know plenty of ACCA members who have never done an audit. I know you need certain experience to gain a practicing certificate to sign audit reports, but if you don't like that sort of work what is the issue?

None of them gave me those sorts of options it was just accounts prep the occassional audit a smattering of tax and more accounts prep and I thought accounts prep this is going to be your working life as an accountant forever..........

If you only talk to people in small practices surely the only advice you will find will be about that sort of work. Which accountancy websites do you read? Why not do a job search on Gaapweb.com and see the sort of openings that are out there? Accountancystudents.co.uk is quiet but does give some decent advice.

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Interesting, thanks ..... when I said it seemed an easy Job, I meant from what I've seen personally of Surveyors ..... basically wondering around a property and checking a few boxes !!

What kind of money do fully qualified QS's earn ..... is there a large or small failure rate on your course ..... how much would your pay be be bumped up when you complete your Masters ??

I take it there is potentially a great deal of work available overseas so you get to travel if you want to ??

It is far beyond wandering round a house, measuring rooms incorrectly and putting a vastly vastly inflated valuation on a house. It is a very common mistake that people make and assume I do what residential surveyors do, if only it was that easy. The salary once qualified depends on experience and location but typically 18-25k when qualified, increasing up to 45-50k. Senior Surveyors earn between 50 - 90k, partners or directors in firms I will let you know how much when I get there. The pass rate on my course is quite low and a lot of the students come from construction firms. Typically they started off as site labourers / brickies and worked up to being foremen. Progressing on to quantity surveying is the next step upwards. I do not know how much completing my masters would increase my pay as the practice I work at try to avoid dispute resolution, and stick more to the project management, planning and pricing side. There is plenty of opportunity to work on projects abroad or move abroad. There is plenty of demand for quantity surveyors throughout Europe, the Middle East and parts of Asia. I am not so sure about the USA, Canada, Africa or Australasia. We were in discussion about a project in Nigeria, but the security risks ended our participation in that before things got off the ground.

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  • 399 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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