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Second Homes Owners Under Fire

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..... I had the idea lined up as a spoof. I could have been paid a fat fee. Damn :angry:

.... & so much for the UK needing thousands of new homes

LINK

Those wishing to buy houses in some of England's most sought-after rural locations face the prospect of having to apply for planning permission to use them as second homes or holiday lets, under the Living Working Countryside review by Liberal Democrat MP Matthew Taylor.

If they did not succeed they would have to live there permanently or rent it out on a full-time basis.

Mr Taylor has proposed the idea be piloted in one of England's national parks before being adopted in popular holiday areas such as parts of Cornwall or Norfolk.

Wealthy city workers have frequently been blamed for pricing locals out of the housing market by purchasing second homes that lie empty for much of the year.

It means that England's villages risk becoming "exclusive enclaves of the elderly and wealthy" where services such as schools and post offices suffer because of a lack of permanent residents.

Mr Taylor's review said there was a "case for controls" on second homes in certain places like St Minver ward in North Cornwall, which includes Polzeath and Rock, where almost half of houses (43 per cent) are registered as second homes.

The review concluded: "There is a case to be made for controlling (through the planning system) further conversion of full time homes into second homes and holiday lets only in those places where there is identifiable impact on the sustainability of the host community."

The plan was attacked yesterday by the Conservatives, who said it would be a "recipe for negative equity" and warned it could lead to homeowners being spied on by council officials checking they really lived there full-time.

Grant Shapps, the shadow housing minister, dismissed the planning proposal as "intrusive and difficult to implement".

He also warned it would distort housing markets, making prices for existing second homes rocket while those owned by full-time occupiers could fall as they became harder to sell.

"This report commissioned by Gordon Brown is a recipe for negative equity," he said. "The last thing the housing market needs at the moment is more government red tape."

He added: "There is also the prospect that town halls would use their controversial surveillance powers to enforce such permission, spying on people's homes to see whether or not it was used as their primary residence."

Alex Roads, a director of North Cornwall estate agency John Bray, said the proposal was unworkable.

"Who is going to control it? It is just nonsense," he said.

Second homes were not necessarily bad for an area, he argued, noting the resultant tourism had brought money and jobs to St Minver.

"What this area needs is affordable housing," he said.

But the idea has been broadly welcomed by the Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE).

Tom Oliver, head of policy, said: "In a free country people should be able to buy a house and live in it when they want to. But, it is also true that some people in low-waged rural economies are owed serious policy intervention by the government to address their need for housing."

He concluded: "Second home-owners should not start getting worried that this is the thin end of the wedge, and that all second homes are under threat. It is a sensible, modest proposal, and could even help them by serving to legitimise the place of second homes in this country, by setting a test." (??? err, tell me that one again ??? :blink: )

Caroline Flint, the housing minister, welcomed the review, commenting: "It's simply not fair that people in rural communities struggle to afford a place of their own."

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Caroline Flint, the housing minister, welcomed the review, commenting: "It's simply not fair that people in rural communities struggle to afford a place of their own." [/color]

Earth to Caroline: Life isn't fair my dear. If it was, then you wouldn't be in your current role, given your qualifications and experience.

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As an idea, it seems to work well in the Channel Islands, where many properties for sale have both 'Local market' and 'Open market' prices. To buy at 'Local market' price, you need to prove residency/local employment etc. Needless to say, the 'Open market' prices are much higher!

Edited by greenalien

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable
Earth to Caroline: Life isn't fair my dear. If it was, then you wouldn't be in your current role, given your qualifications and experience.

She must be a blinding shag.

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As an idea, it seems to work well in the Channel Islands, where many properties for sale have both 'Local market' and 'Open market' prices. To buy at 'Local market' price, you need to prove residency/local employment etc. Needless to say, the 'Open market' prices are much higher!

Happens in many other countries. Sounds perfectly resonable. Problem is that there are less and less resources peopel from cities buying up all teh spares homes jsut isn't an option anymore.

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I think it's a fantastic idea!

I thought HPC was based around a dislike of greed (among other things).

Second home owners are partly to blame for the destruction of rural communities, so any deterent the government can offer has my backing.

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable
Nope, far too busy.

Sorry to hear that, Mr Flint.

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This just creates cliques though and often money-making cliques at that.

Take The Gower for example. If an 'outsider' wishes to buy some land and build on it on the Gower you have no end of trouble with 'locals', various Gower organisations, etc, trying to stop you at every turn, objecting to planning permissions, getting the Council to measure everything to the millimeter after the property is built... assuming it is ever built.

But, those who already live on the Gower seem to have no problem in taking aside a bit of their land, getting permission to build a house on it, throwing it up and then, a few years later, sticking it on the market often for hundreds of K more than it cost. Nice 'little' earner that is.

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As an idea, it seems to work well in the Channel Islands, where many properties for sale have both 'Local market' and 'Open market' prices. To buy at 'Local market' price, you need to prove residency/local employment etc. Needless to say, the 'Open market' prices are much higher!

Not sure its a workable idea in england though.. after all where do you draw the boundaries... is it only desirable seaside towns in the west of england... if so what happens to their economies when the number of beds to let drops like a stone... does it apply to everyhere else, if not why not, shouldn't everyone have the same rights, ie to be able buy a home in the place they call home (if they can afford it) which is after all what this is all about... how then do you justify someone having to pay a different sum in the west of england to kensington and chelsea... surely the person born in kensington and wanting to live in kensington becasue its his or her spiritual home shouldn't have to pay more than someone living in stIves.... you then get to the issue of mobility... if you work in london and want to retire to the west but want to maintain a house in london becasue you are going to work three days a week how will that work.... then get into the mechanics of it... how do you tell if someones doing holiday lets vs doing longer term lets, whats the sanction going to be, whos going to run it, how do you differ from letting your friends use the place etc etc.

I am not against the principle of it, but to be frank I think it hasn't got a cat in hells chance becasue we are so far down the line with this already....... on another point how do you differ between a couple who are for the sake of argument seprated but not legally so who have two houses in an area, and how do you then police that against a couple who are for instance not seperated but claim they are and in that way have a home in the west and home in london for instance.

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Sounds fair to me, I've moved into one old people's home of a place. Please kick the old fart second home owners near me out. Most paths around here have signs saying:

No Ball Games

No Skateboarding

No Roller Blading

No Cycling

I ignore all of these where possible

They may as well say: Boomers not having fun, so nobody is

or: Go die on the roads kids

The only thing which seems to be aloud is tottering along winging at the youth of today who's average age is about thirty five to forty where I'm living. Bloody depressing especially if you are looking for some action or continue your family line.

Edited by Ipodjunky

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Apartments abroad will go back up in price then. All these holiday homes will get flogged off once house price stop rising to dizzy heights. Maintaining a depreciating asset with ever rising costs will put an end to a lot.

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As an idea, it seems to work well in the Channel Islands, where many properties for sale have both 'Local market' and 'Open market' prices. To buy at 'Local market' price, you need to prove residency/local employment etc. Needless to say, the 'Open market' prices are much higher!

There must be more to it than that, is there any compulsion on sellers to sell at the local market price if a suitable offer is made?

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The last time this issue was aired nationally the Daily Mail carried a headline screaming that the idea was an `Attack on the Middle-classes` as if every middle-class person has a cottage in Windermere as well as a bijou -flat in Twickenham ( pretty much in the manner that they seem to imagine every middle-class family forks out 20K a year in school fees)

Edited by Wires 74

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The majority of second homes that I know of are also holiday lets to pay the mortgage on them. Most of the money spent when people holiday in these local cottages just goes to the banks in interest and owners are just looking for capital appreciation.

It is not difficult to find out if a place is a second home as most advertise on the net and it not difficult to look up planning.

It's all about numbers, we need to look at ways of reducing the number of second homes/holiday lets in those where they are having an effect on the local community.

We also need to look at alternatives to cater for tourism. A local caravan site near me is being upgraded to timber chalets. There are sites that are not suitable for local housing due to lack of infastructure. Why not allow planning for purpose built holiday homes?

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QUOTE (greenalien @ Jul 23 2008, 05:21 PM)

As an idea, it seems to work well in the Channel Islands, where many properties for sale have both 'Local market' and 'Open market' prices. To buy at 'Local market' price, you need to prove residency/local employment etc. Needless to say, the 'Open market' prices are much higher!

There must be more to it than that, is there any compulsion on sellers to sell at the local market price if a suitable offer is made?

The houses have already been allocated either local or open market. If you are rich enough to buy an open market home than you're laughing.

The local market homes are for CI citizens - they have very strict laws on who can live there; pity that the UK doesn't do the same.

Those from another country with a local housing licence which comes with a job are able to rent or purchase on the local market, with restrictions. Once that licence expires (ie the employment is over (fixed term)) you can no longer live in the house, even if bought! You can then only rent or sell to someone with a local housing licence. I am sure there are other points to this but the above is from my understanding.

Edited by wheresitgone

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wake up hpc'ers

WAKE UP.

WAKE UP

this right here is the most important line in that article:

The plan was attacked yesterday by the Conservatives, who said it would be a "recipe for negative equity" and warned it could lead to homeowners being spied on by council officials checking they really lived there full-time.

that means the next in power are not going to change a damn thing. let the villages be for the retired wealthy, the politicians and the business powermongers. after all, they need a place to relax in what, less than 10 years.

and that is the conservatives i'm talking about, while cameron may take a blair role and jet off wherever, most backbenches could not face living in their city/town constituency, and there are plenty of the backbenchers, but not plenty of countryside village outlets.

makes you think about planning laws altoghether differently hey?

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The houses have already been allocated either local or open market. If you are rich enough to buy an open market home than you're laughing.

The local market homes are for CI citizens - they have very strict laws on who can live there; pity that the UK doesn't do the same.

Those from another country with a local housing licence which comes with a job are able to rent or purchase on the local market, with restrictions. Once that licence expires (ie the employment is over (fixed term)) you can no longer live in the house, even if bought! You can then only rent or sell to someone with a local housing licence. I am sure there are other points to this but the above is from my understanding.

Such a thing exists in my area. It's known as the "Derbyshire Residents Clause". It only seems to have been applied to a small number of properties in some of the most picturesque villages.

It's managed to keep the price of a 3 bed semi down to the £200K mark ;)

http://212.50.188.105/cgi-win/vebra.cgi?de...1/MOORL/63405/2

125K for a one bed flat :blink:

http://www.thinkproperty.com/property/14869948

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wake up hpc'ers

WAKE UP.

WAKE UP

this right here is the most important line in that article:

that means the next in power are not going to change a damn thing. let the villages be for the retired wealthy, the politicians and the business powermongers. after all, they need a place to relax in what, less than 10 years.

and that is the conservatives i'm talking about, while cameron may take a blair role and jet off wherever, most backbenches could not face living in their city/town constituency, and there are plenty of the backbenchers, but not plenty of countryside village outlets.

makes you think about planning laws altoghether differently hey?

That is exactly what I thought.

On another thread running the last couple of days it was asked if the Tories would have made HPI worse or better if they had been running things for the last 10 years.

I think the Conservative spokesman just gave us all the clear answer <_<

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Such a thing exists in my area. It's known as the "Derbyshire Residents Clause". It only seems to have been applied to a small number of properties in some of the most picturesque villages.

How does the system work? If you own one of these properties are you somehow legally forced to sell it to a local resident, or is it just some kind of gentleman's agreement? If the former it sounds like it could be a real stone round your neck from the seller's point of view if you have to wait for a buyer who fits a defined set of criteria?

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How does the system work? If you own one of these properties are you somehow legally forced to sell it to a local resident, or is it just some kind of gentleman's agreement? If the former it sounds like it could be a real stone round your neck from the seller's point of view if you have to wait for a buyer who fits a defined set of criteria?

The main owner has to have been resident or working in Derbyshire for at least 3 years.

Never having bought a property with a clause on it, I don't know how the details of how the system works when it comes to proof.

From what I found on google it appears there are loopholes

http://www.bakewelltoday.co.uk/news/Villag...-row.1114500.jp

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  • 399 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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