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Bigtimebear

Dear Phil Spencer

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1.Drop the price

2.Drop the price

3.Drop the price

4.Drop the price

5.Drop the price

6.Drop the price

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8.Drop the price

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10 - 25 - Drop the price

Idiot.

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The Times Money Central

25 tips from Phil, Krusty, Colin, Justin and some other bint. Not one of them being:

Drop the fecking price!

25 tips to sell your home in a downturn

Desperate sellers across the land are battling for the attention of an ever-dwindling number of buyers. According to a recent report, there are 15 homes on the market for every buyer. And the headache for homeowners eager to sell up doesn’t stop at finding an interested party. Estate Agents report offers are falling far below asking prices.

To help struggling vendors, Times Money has spoken to five celebrity property experts to build a unbeatable list of hints and tips to ensure homeowners snag that elusive sale. From new taps to laptops, here are 25 tips to help you sell your home.

Phil Spencer, presenter of Location, Location, Location with Kirsty Allsopp (above) and CEO of property search company Garrington says:

1. Get cleaning. It might sound obvious but make sure the outside of your house is neat, tidy and well presented. Smelly bins, rusty bikes, a messy garden, a broken gate etc can make a real difference to how a house is perceived and remembered by a prospective buyer.

2. Get painting. If the outside of your house is looking a bit tatty then I would recommend a professional paint job if you can afford it. A freshly painted façade, railings, front door etc really can make a difference.

3. Keep it simple. Don’t spend too much money on your property trying to ‘do it up’ to sell. Simple cosmetic improvements will be the most worthwhile in the current market

4. De-clutter the inside of your house. Make sure that surfaces such as mantelpieces, windowsills, dressers and tables are clear of unnecessary clutter. If you have a spare room or study that is often used as a dressing room or general dumping ground, then clear it out before you commence viewings. De-cluttering can make rooms appear bigger, and junk-free surfaces create a far better impression of space.

5. Choose the right agent. Make sure you choose the right estate agent for your type of property and price bracket and try not to get tied into lengthy ‘sole agency’ agreements.

Colin and Justin, property experts and television presenters, suggest:

6. Lifestyle additions, while less tangible than other areas, can make all the difference. It might be a cool flat screen TV or a hot new laptop but their subliminal signalling can make all the difference. People like to ‘buy into’ success and ‘lifestyle visuals’ can make all the difference. What’s more, you, the seller, take these things with you when you leave!

7. Sell smart. Few people will be impressed if you answer the door in a dirty track suit with food debris down the front. People buy people so ALWAYS get smart. We’re not suggesting top hat and tails or a ball gown when your buyer is about to arrive – just a little sensible sartorial thinking.

8. Emphasise features that make your house stand out. We’re not talking heli pads or landing strips, just fab extra’s like one more bedroom than the rest of the houses in the street or a fantastically large garden if the rest of the street is crammed for space. Yours might be the house that has an unbroken view to the river whereas others in the street look onto a cliff face. And so on…

9. A shower. If you don’t have one, buyers will be put off or will at least adjust their offer. Installing shower fittings to your tub or a separate cubicle is costly but it could make all the difference.

10. Know your market. The trick with any investment is to produce an appropriate product. And the same principal applies to home selling. Quiz your local Estate Agent about what’s selling, and then follow their advice. Could it be, perhaps, that your three-bedroom house is in an area where young professionals without families are buying? And that, therefore, your third bedroom might appear more valuable if dressed as an office?

11. Leave something for buyers to do – whether DIY or décor. This is an odd one, but if there is nothing at all to do some people won’t feel challenged. A few bits to do here and there will make buyers feel they can make even more of your home and in turn increase its value further when they become owners. Without wanting to contradict everything else, this is a good point to argue.

Ann Maurice, presenter of House Doctor on Five, says that “buyers buy with their emotions, not their heads.” She suggests:

12. Buyers respond to light, capitalise on natural light sources and supplement with lamps, candles and reflective surfaces.

13. Water features or subtle wind chimes can be soothing in outdoor spaces, and can help mask exterior noise that you can’t control. Light background music also helps, but be subtle with the volume.

14. Providing texture in soft furnishings and accessories adds depth and comfort and entices buyers.

15. Use bowls of fresh fruits or vegetables as “accessories” in kitchens and dining rooms.

16. Use scents that say “home”... fresh baked bread or cookies, vanilla, cinnamon, coffee and of course the best scent of all - clean fresh air, so ensure you open all the windows and air out the house before viewings.

Martin Roberts is the presenter of BBC TV’s property auction show Homes Under The Hammer and the author of the new book, Teach Yourself: Making Money From Property, says:

17. Curb appeal – provide off street parking. Having the curb in front of your property lowered so you can create a driveway or off street parking if it doesn’t already exist is time consuming (you’ll need to put in a planning application with the council) but not expensive (£800 to £1500) and it will add considerable value and differentiate your property.

18. Repaint walls and ceilings in neutral colours if they aren’t already. A fresh coat of paint can transform a property- but do clear away all tools and paint pots.

19. Swap old lamp fittings for modern ones- ideally with halogen or low energy bulbs. It’s not an expensive job, but you will create a much more modern and cared for feeling for the property, plus old lamp fittings are often dusty and dated.

20. Replace the kitchen work surface. You don’t have to go to the trouble of a full kitchen refit but replacing the work surface with a new one will dramatically improve and rejuvenate a tired looking kitchen. Putting in a new sink at the same time will also work wonders. You can also just replace the cabinet fronts, rather than the whole cabinet

21. Replace old and worn carpets. Old carpets smell, look and feel terrible. If they’re beyond cleaning, replacing them with even budget carpet will give a very positive impression and at £1.99 a sq m, won’t cost a lot!

22. Replace old light switches and taps. Accessorising with quality (but not expensive) fixtures and fittings will again give a very positive impression. The internet is a good source of discounted fixtures, fittings and building and renovation materials. £500 taps can often be found for £20 - £30.

Melissa Porter, property expert and presenter of I Own Britain's Best Home on Five, says:

23. Home stage your house. Pamper it, de-ruffle, polish and tidy it to an inch of it's life. Refer to home magazines and emulate the look. Buyers should not be given the opportunity to chip any more money from the selling price.

24. Banish pet odour with generous amounts of smelling salts.

25. Avoid chintz, flying ducks, any wallpaper from Laurence Lewelyn Bowen's range, and frankly anything that will offend potential buyers or cause people to react adversely towards it.

Posted by James Charles on July 18, 2008 at 02:39 PM in Mortgage

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26. Burn a handful of human hair five minutes before the viewers arrive. It'll produce an attractive, lived-in atmosphere that'll have buyers reaching for their chequebooks right away.

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“buyers buy with their emotions, not their heads.”

Lunatics.

Did they recommend sacrificing a baby to the Almighty House Gods to ward off evil?

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10. Know your market. The trick with any investment is to produce an appropriate product. And the same principal applies to home selling. Quiz your local Estate Agent about what’s selling, and then follow their advice. Could it be, perhaps, that your three-bedroom house is in an area where young professionals without families are buying? And that, therefore, your third bedroom might appear more valuable if dressed as an office?

:lol::lol::lol:

"The estate agent told us that detached houses with large grounds were still selling so we decided to give our 2-bed flat a makeover."

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5. Choose the right agent. Make sure you choose the right estate agent for your type of property and price bracket and try not to get tied into lengthy ‘sole agency’ agreements.

May I suggest the Exchange and Mart, they have a web presence too.

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7. Sell smart. Few people will be impressed if you answer the door in a dirty track suit with food debris down the front. People buy people so ALWAYS get smart. We’re not suggesting top hat and tails or a ball gown when your buyer is about to arrive – just a little sensible sartorial thinking.

Ha ha. I think you should dress like these two.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnFrIAbcIZs

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26. Burn a handful of human hair five minutes before the viewers arrive. It'll produce an attractive, lived-in atmosphere that'll have buyers reaching for their chequebooks right away.

LOL

I can confirm painting the outside which I did myself for a tenner and putting new worktops on which I did myself for £50 helped me sell 2 former places, as did laminate flooring which I did for £100 myself and off street parking which I did myself for £200 exc dropped kerb.

However, only a dummy will pay more than they have to, so dropping the price is obviously the best bet, but if you're all priced the same then the tips I've just written will give you the edge, providing you're not in some part of the country where there's chalk outlines on the pavement every 500 yards - amazingly property prices haven't plummeted for that tragic reason alone. Just shows how daft these neo yuppies are, totally lack common sense, overpay as they've lost all sense of value and even then buy into areas with dangerous social problems bang next door. "We'll just hope for the best, Vanessa, they're just kids after all..." (Or "The tenants won't mind, Vanessa, they'll think it makes the area 'happening'!")

Edited by The Last Bear

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27. Gently melt a square of dark chocolate (Lindt 85% is ideal) between the palms of your hands. Take a fluffy white towel, use the chocolate to make a thick brown smear down the centre of the towel and then hang it in a prominent position in the bathroom.

A variation of this involving bedsheets (or if you're feeling particularly playful, a pillow) comes in handy when you're staying with the in-laws.

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10. Know your market. The trick with any investment is to produce an appropriate product. And the same principal applies to home selling. Quiz your local Estate Agent about what’s selling, and then follow their advice. Could it be, perhaps, that your three-bedroom house is in an area where young professionals without families are buying? And that, therefore, your third bedroom might appear more valuable if dressed as an office?

And when the answer is nothing you do what???

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10 - 25 - Drop the price

Idiot.

Isn't it maazing, during the boom the way to "add" value was to repaint, lay some laminate flooring, new kitchen units from MFI etc.

When you sold you made a "profit", which during the boom had more to do with inflation than the improvements.

Why aren't they telling people to do the same during the bust?

Perhaps because these amateur property developers were adding practically nothing in the first place?

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Why on earth does Times Money think it needs 'celebrity experts' to hand out this type of tosh?

Do they think unless someone's got a tv series they have no expertise or credibility?

Just look at what they've come up with!

Give us the opinions of proper experts, not entertainers!

If want to flog my house, I can do without advice from Frank Spencer...

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable
27. Gently melt a square of dark chocolate (Lindt 85% is ideal) between the palms of your hands. Take a fluffy white towel, use the chocolate to make a thick brown smear down the centre of the towel and then hang it in a prominent position in the bathroom.

A variation of this involving bedsheets (or if you're feeling particularly playful, a pillow) comes in handy when you're staying with the in-laws.

If you are Scottish and selling a property.

1) Yu'll be better pals wuth potenshul biyers, if ye swear a but.

2) Leave a white puddin or two aroond the place so as to appear wealthy

3) The smell ae cheep fags ull make the place feel homely

4) Dunnae wurry aboot the price, Scotland hannae nae nevarrr had hoose prices gae doon.

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I just can't get over the sheer awwogance and the over inflated self importance of these "celebrity" pwoperty "experts" such as Spencer. You would think that after the start of the biggest pwoperty cwash since the Gweat Depwession that Spencer and Allsop et al would be too ashamed to keep peddling their cwap! It can only be a matter of time before the sheeple wake up and realise that the likes of Spencer are no more than gweasy snakeskin sales people. Wight Phil? ;):P

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11. Leave something for buyers to do – whether DIY or décor. This is an odd one, but if there is nothing at all to do some people won’t feel challenged. A few bits to do here and there will make buyers feel they can make even more of your home and in turn increase its value further when they become owners. Without wanting to contradict everything else, this is a good point to argue.

The world has turned. Leave the whole lot for them to do and DROP THE PRICE (and forget about people walking in and looking for 'an opportunity').

The world is full of cynical people that tell idiots what they want to hear ...

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I am starting to feel sorry for people, the advice given on lots of other forums i frequent is get your credit card out and tart the house up still.

The bleeding obvious is starring them in the face and B&Q is still seen as the saviour of people already up to their eyes in it.

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1.Drop the price

2.Drop the price

3.Drop the price

4.Drop the price

5.Drop the price

6.Drop the price

7.Drop the price

8.Drop the price

9.Drop the price

10 - 25 - Drop the price

Idiot.

Mmmm, and don't forget to have some freshly baked bread aromas wafting through the house.

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Mmmm, and don't forget to have some freshly baked bread aromas wafting through the house.

its all so 2006... Don't forget to take a photo with the MEWed Posrche outside

(seriously, from the article: )

"6. People like to ‘buy into’ success and ‘lifestyle visuals’ can make all the difference. What’s more, you, the seller, take these things with you when you leave! "

Edited by dryrot

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable
I am starting to feel sorry for people, the advice given on lots of other forums i frequent is get your credit card out and tart the house up still.

The bleeding obvious is starring them in the face and B&Q is still seen as the saviour of people already up to their eyes in it.

It's pretty grim isn't it?

A bit like me suggesting hairdressing tips are the most important factor in dealing with leukaemia.

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It's pretty grim isn't it?

A bit like me suggesting hairdressing tips are the most important factor in dealing with leukaemia.

Are they? Could you give me 25 tips for beating luekaemia with a hair brush?

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"15. Use bowls of fresh fruits or vegetables as “accessories” in kitchens and dining rooms."

This one is my favourite.

That would inspire me to add a couple of grand to the offer price...

:unsure:

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  • 396 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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