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punter

Deficit Financing

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well, the sheeple voted for it and now it's here, the government is borrowing $50bn a quarter to keep its rotten state funded and Cameron is fully signed up to it, so don't think anything is about to change

that's $200bn a year for at least a few years, which everyone is going to be working hard to pay off in the form of permanently high taxes, fines and soaring inflation, all so we can employ a few more public sector fat cats

this is your schools n' hospitals, lying on the alter of a decrepit, bankrupt state, who cannot fund them and so is going to inflate and destroy the economy for decades, yes decades to come.

http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/busi...icle4360643.ece

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I despise nulab and everything they stand for (which is of course is themselves) but recall a time when the Tories used to stand for minimum gumment interference and therefore cost. What the hell are they doing???? <_<

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I despise nulab and everything they stand for (which is of course is themselves) but recall a time when the Tories used to stand for minimum gumment interference and therefore cost. What the hell are they doing???? <_<

But minimum governmental interference and all that was only ever empty rhetoric. The power of the state had to be harnessed to facilitate massive privatisations so as to transfer wealth to private corporations.

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But minimum governmental interference and all that was only ever empty rhetoric. The power of the state had to be harnessed to facilitate massive privatisations so as to transfer wealth to private corporations.

And look where that got us :blink:

It really is time for a 'V' moment.....

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And look where that got us :blink:

It really is time for a 'V' moment.....

All states rely upon the ability to use violence with no real opposition.

Therefore all states expand until they completely collapse having -

1) No way of being stopped from without.

2) No feedback mechanism from within.

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All states rely upon the ability to use violence with no real opposition.

Therefore all states expand until they completely collapse having -

1) No way of being stopped from without.

2) No feedback mechanism from within.

Is that a quote or did you make it up.... if you did, it sounds very good. :rolleyes:

Lets hope this lot collapse soon....

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Is that a quote or did you make it up.... if you did, it sounds very good. :rolleyes:

Lets hope this lot collapse soon....

it doesn't really matter since the new group that would replace them will most likely go through the exact same process, if history is any example.

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it doesn't really matter since the new group that would replace them will most likely go through the exact same process, if history is any example.

Naw mate, this time it's different. :lol:

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Is that a quote or did you make it up.... if you did, it sounds very good. :rolleyes:

Lets hope this lot collapse soon....

Maybe they/it have/has (it's early, ooh my head) already collapsed, but as the dear ones involved continue as normal few have realised.

........... just like property value, it only exists on a window display.

It's all an illusion anyway. One day you wake up on your home planet & wonder why you volunteered....again

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the problem is that idiot Brown when Chancellor was like a kid let loose in a sweet shop with a £50 note...his spending commitments mean even a modest downturn in the economy would take the annual deficit to £100 billion (7% of GDP)....

He started off ok by even repaying some of the national debt but became more and more profligate as the each year passed

Edited by Michael

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the problem is that idiot Brown when Chancellor was like a kid let loose in a sweet shop with a £50 note...his spending commitments mean even a modest downturn in the economy would take the annual deficit to £100 billion (7% of GDP)....

He started off ok by even repaying some of the national debt but became more and more profligate as the each year passed

it's not so different from the HPC really.

to keep the boom going it took more and more loans at higher and higher amounts, until ultimately a crash set in.

government spending has been on the same course.

every year more and more of the economy has been supported by government deficit spending, which requires more and more deficit spending to keep it all going.

you are very likely to see the same kind of outcome as you do with houses.

which is also why they can't just cut spending.

that would have the same effect as the credit crunch did on mortgages.

Edited by Mr Nice

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the problem is that idiot Brown when Chancellor was like a kid let loose in a sweet shop with a £50 note...his spending commitments mean even a modest downturn in the economy would take the annual deficit to £100 billion (7% of GDP)....

He started off ok by even repaying some of the national debt but became more and more profligate as the each year passed

The problem is that throughout the decades,whoever has got in has played the cycle.

Labour is in power to provide a "creative destruction"...by over regulating everything.

The consequence of this is business capital transfer from west to east....with socialisation of the burden by the taxpayer.

the whole lot has a lagging effect,it's like growing vegetables.

..you plant the seeds,and have to wait a few months before you have a crop.

when the tories get back in they will do the opposite of labour,and will bring capital back after a few years.

...don't get your hopes up on a quick fix,this probably isn't on the cards until 2015.

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It's a pity no one has got the money to challenge the govt on this in court. Not that they would win as I'm sure a few quiet words would be said to the judge to find in the govt favour but it could educate the public.

Although most people aren't actually interested in this as they don't see the relevance to their own lives.

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Although most people aren't actually interested in this as they don't see the relevance to their own lives.

People are starting to see the relevance to their own lives as they take a drop in living standards.

Our political system is broken and so the 3 main parties pretend the are in oposition when in fact they are all in bed togeather so don't think the Cons will do a dam thing apart from continuing to spin and blame the other side whilst increasing our taxes and removing our freedoms.

MP's need to be accoutable to the public and this will not come about via the bollot box in a rigged system.

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They saw a drop in living standards in the 70's and nothing happened.

The lying ******* politicians will spin new lies to make people feel better and joe public will then think they know what they are doing.

Nothing will alter.

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They saw a drop in living standards in the 70's and nothing happened.

The lying ******* politicians will spin new lies to make people feel better and joe public will then think they know what they are doing.

Nothing will alter.

I'm not sure that's true. 1976 is regarded by many as the happiest on record, notwithstanding the drought and all that.

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/main.jhtm.../19/ccom119.xml

Labour has led us into recession already in the red. To fund spending commitments and the extra spending bound to come in a recession from rising dole claims, they're going to have to borrow even more. And, of course, as they borrow more their income will fall as tax revenues decline along with economic activity. Their fiscal "rules" will be broken which is why the Treasury has been looking at rewriting the "rules" to give them the headroom to borrow the extra cash they need.

My memories are still fresh of interviewing Alistair Darling in No.11 Downing Street last September, the day before the Northern Rock disaster first became apparent. He lectured me about the dangers of excessive lending and borrowing. His very words were: "They [borrowers] need to ask themselves, 'can I repay this?' and lenders need to ask themselves, 'If it goes wrong can I get it back?' People do need to think long and hard about this. One of the by-products of the current situation is that, not just at a high level but right across the piece, people will be a bit more cautious."

Will they? Well yes, we will because as taxpayers and consumers we'll be forced to. But who's going to force the Government to stop its reckless and irresponsible behaviour? The salvation of the ballot box in 2010 is still a dangerously long time away as far as the deteriorating health of the economy is concerned. This week has confirmed many things, including the fact the lunatics really are running the asylum and clearing up the mess is going to be absolutely ghastly.

Obviously Darling has thought long and hard about this and realised he's not the one going to have to pay all of this back so it's not an issue for him.

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Darling knows he won't have to pay the money back as he won't be in charge after the next election so he doesn't care.

So when taxes go up the rich will leave whilst we pay it off. Then when taxes get cut they will return.

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All states rely upon the ability to use violence with no real opposition.

Therefore all states expand until they completely collapse having -

1) No way of being stopped from without.

2) No feedback mechanism from within.

Normally I scroll past your posts, but really...

ALL states? Granted there's a few examples, but the vast majority of nation states would seem to contradict your doomstering... :rolleyes:

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Normally I scroll past your posts, but really...

ALL states? Granted there's a few examples, but the vast majority of nation states would seem to contradict your doomstering... :rolleyes:

Er.... can you name any state that hasn't used the threat of violence against the public without any real threat of retaliation? I've racked my brains and can't actually think of one..... and I'm not p1ssed.

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Er.... can you name any state that hasn't used the threat of violence against the public without any real threat of retaliation? I've racked my brains and can't actually think of one..... and I'm not p1ssed.

Vatican? :lol:

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Normally I scroll past your posts, but really...

ALL states? Granted there's a few examples, but the vast majority of nation states would seem to contradict your doomstering... :rolleyes:

Yes all states function by the threat of violence, try refusing to pay your Council Tax and see what happens.

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  • 399 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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