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punter

Robert Chote, Ifs

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Robert Chote, director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies, said the weakness of the economy, housing market and stock market meant "whoever wins the next election is likely to be under pressure to increase taxes, rather than have scope to cut them".

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err, how about cutting unaffordable services you state loving cretin? why does the answer have to be to raise taxes? not like you can raise taxes any more and expect to collect much in a downturn, not to mention to take into account the suffering of the people and the damage it does to the economy

John Major had the right idea in the early 90's when the tax burden was lowered to 34%, it kick started the 'economic miracle' that labour have sought to destroy and have jacked up the burden to around 44% and grew the size of the state in the process, near DOUBLING it.

if we got back to the size of government around the year 2000, we could eliminate INCOME TAX or fuel tax, think about that. we'd have to sack thousands of useless administrators though and cut the size of the state

then we can start discussing the role of the Bank of England and money creation and why we have these boom/bust cycle's thanks to artificially low interest rates which are totally unnecessary and only serve to screw the people through inflation and tax.

who's with me?

The IFS should be renamed the Institute for Statist Studies

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/7506593.stm

oh and why is Cameron promising to match Labour's unsustainable and unaffordable spending plans? is he really that stupid? there is no hope.

Edited by punter

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Robert Chote, director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies, said the weakness of the economy, housing market and stock market meant "whoever wins the next election is likely to be under pressure to increase taxes, rather than have scope to cut them".

---

err, how about cutting unaffordable services you state loving cretin? why does the answer have to be to raise taxes? not like you can raise taxes any more and expect to collect much in a downturn, not to mention to take into account the suffering of the people and the damage it does to the economy

John Major had the right idea in the early 90's when the tax burden was lowered to 34%, it kick started the 'economic miracle' that labour have sought to destroy and have jacked up the burden to around 44% and grew the size of the state in the process, near DOUBLING it.

if we got back to the size of government around the year 2000, we could eliminate INCOME TAX or fuel tax, think about that. we'd have to sack thousands of useless administrators though and cut the size of the state

then we can start discussing the role of the Bank of England and money creation and why we have these boom/bust cycle's thanks to artificially low interest rates which are totally unnecessary and only serve to screw the people through inflation and tax.

who's with me?

The IFS should be renamed the Institute for Statist Studies

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/7506593.stm

oh and why is Cameron promising to match Labour's unsustainable and unaffordable spending plans? is he really that stupid? there is no hope.

So what would you cut? And how would reducing demand at the begining of a slump do anything but prolong the slump? :rolleyes:

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So what would you cut? And how would reducing demand at the begining of a slump do anything but prolong the slump? :rolleyes:

i would cut government and services, roll them back to the year 2000 at least, then i would cut taxes and encourage enterprise rather than strangle it

specifically i would eliminate fuel and income tax

Edited by punter

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i would cut government and services, roll them back to the year 2000 at least, then i would cut taxes and encourage enterprise rather than strangle it

specifically i would eliminate fuel and income tax

But what services would you cut? You say what taxes you will cut, but what services? Health? Defence? What?

Edited by 1929crash

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But what services would you cut? You say what taxes you will cut, but what services? Health? Defence? What?

I would cut everything they have increased since 2000, I would essentially reverse their spending, i dont think defence has had much of an increase, i'd cut all the heath and education bureaucrat's and whatever else

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John Major had the right idea in the early 90's when the tax burden was lowered to 34%, it kick started the 'economic miracle' that labour have sought to destroy and have jacked up the burden to around 44% and grew the size of the state in the process, near DOUBLING it.

So we've doubled services by increasing the tax burden from 34% to 44% not 68%?

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So we've doubled services by increasing the tax burden from 34% to 44% not 68%?

and through inflation of the money supply, go and check what the gov spent in 1997 and when they want to spend now, it's about double

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I think the public services bill could be cut by 80%. There are billions of pounds a year being paid to new labour parasites in cushy non jobs.

So if we cut the NHS budget by 80% we'd only lose a few pen pushers? you mean there'd be no cuts in treatment or anything? Gosh!

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So if we cut the NHS budget by 80% we'd only lose a few pen pushers? you mean there'd be no cuts in treatment or anything? Gosh!

was there an NHS in the year 2000? i think so

besides, the NHS is not the best way to deliver healthcare, the government cannot afford it so it has to make cuts and face reality sooner or later

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was there an NHS in the year 2000? i think so

besides, the NHS is not the best way to deliver healthcare, the government cannot afford it so it has to make cuts and face reality sooner or later

So what do you mean exactly by an 80% cut? and are you advocating US style health insurance with 47 million people unable even to visit the doctor?

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was there an NHS in the year 2000? i think so

Yes, there was. It was in A Right State and we spent just over 6% of GDP on it.

Last year we spent 7.8% of GDP on it, and it was rather better, although frankly too much of that went to too few GPs.

In total, including people going private, we spent 9.2% of GDP on health, the least of any developed country.

The US spend 15.3%, and got a worse deal. France and Germany each spent 10.5%

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I saw Robert Chote on TV (I think it was him) and he was pretty good I thought. The problem is that cutting public spending is very difficult. It rises inexorably for a few years even when serious pressure is being brought to bring it down. That means taxes and PSBR will have to rise for a while.

Unfortunatley, it will take a Thatcher style recesison similar too the early 1980s to get through this - has Cameron got the stomach for it? I think he will have the majority and I think he will have the mandate because people are getting desperate enough to accept desperate measures but will he be brave enough and independent enough? Only time will tell but this is going to hurt.

The economy is now truely out of control with fiscal tightening happening by default because Labour dare not raise taxes much more and so forced cost cutting is inevitable or at least cost stabilisation in the public sector. The money supply is collapsing because banks will not lend and are just shrinkig their balance sheets as quick as posisble and so monetray policy is not under BoE or Govt vondtrol as the capital markets are driving what gets lent out and at what rate.

Monetray policy and fiscal policy both tightening at the same time is what classically causes deep recessions and this is happening now and Govt has no control over it.

At a time in the forseeable future houses wil be trading at far below fair value but no one will be willing or able to borow to buy them. Then is the time to buy - cash and yiled will be king again and not asset value inflation.

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Major is beginning to look like a genius compared to what these cretins have delivered.
Major was very underated did a good job at a very bad time ,and still had time for a Curry

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I saw Robert Chote on TV (I think it was him) and he was pretty good I thought. The problem is that cutting public spending is very difficult. It rises inexorably for a few years even when serious pressure is being brought to bring it down. That means taxes and PSBR will have to rise for a while.

Unfortunatley, it will take a Thatcher style recesison similar too the early 1980s to get through this - has Cameron got the stomach for it? I think he will have the majority and I think he will have the mandate because people are getting desperate enough to accept desperate measures but will he be brave enough and independent enough? Only time will tell but this is going to hurt.

The economy is now truely out of control with fiscal tightening happening by default because Labour dare not raise taxes much more and so forced cost cutting is inevitable or at least cost stabilisation in the public sector. The money supply is collapsing because banks will not lend and are just shrinkig their balance sheets as quick as posisble and so monetray policy is not under BoE or Govt vondtrol as the capital markets are driving what gets lent out and at what rate.

Monetray policy and fiscal policy both tightening at the same time is what classically causes deep recessions and this is happening now and Govt has no control over it.

At a time in the forseeable future houses wil be trading at far below fair value but no one will be willing or able to borow to buy them. Then is the time to buy - cash and yiled will be king again and not asset value inflation.

Mrs Thatcher had a get-out-of-jail-free card. It was called North Sea oil. Now it's running out and there's nothing to bring the economy back from the dead as in the 1980s.

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  • 399 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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