Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Perishabull

Thinking Of Buying Now Or In The Future...?

Recommended Posts

My girlfriend and I have been occassionally viewing properties, I certainly don't want to buy now but if the right one comes at a very good price we may just go for it however...

We went for a second viewing tonight and I thought lets's take a tape measure to measure all the rooms (on the pre-text that we wanted very accurate readings for flooring etc).

I would like to say I am surprised by the result but sadly am not.

Only one room was accurate in comparison to the measurements on the schedule

The long side of one bedroom was 1 ft 6 inches longer in the schedule than my measurement

The long side of the kitchen was 9 inches longer in the schedule

The long side of the second bedroom was 6 inches longer in the schedule

The bathroom length was 5 inches longer in the schedule

Now this is from an EA that I had thought to be up there in terms of trustworthyness (naive I know), not one of the ones that gets a bad press.

You will no doubt have read the disclaimer on all schedules, 'All areas and measurements are approximate only' etc, this allows carte blanche for these types of "mistake".

So, what a fantastic negotiating tactic I thought. View a property once, perhaps twice, negotiate a price and then ask for a final visit to check something. Go along and do all your measurements and hey presto you can then negotiate the price down further by advising that the previous price agreed was based on what you thought were accurate measurements in the schedule. Part of the valuation in property is floor space after all. This has got to be a way of getting at least a further £5K or £10K off, more if the property value is higher of course.

I'd be interested in people's thoughts and if anyone else has come accross this as it could be very commonplace!

I woud urge people to do this

PerishTHEbull

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My girlfriend and I have been occassionally viewing properties, I certainly don't want to buy now but if the right one comes at a very good price we may just go for it however...

We went for a second viewing tonight and I thought lets's take a tape measure to measure all the rooms (on the pre-text that we wanted very accurate readings for flooring etc).

I would like to say I am surprised by the result but sadly am not.

Only one room was accurate in comparison to the measurements on the schedule

The long side of one bedroom was 1 ft 6 inches longer in the schedule than my measurement

The long side of the kitchen was 9 inches longer in the schedule

The long side of the second bedroom was 6 inches longer in the schedule

The bathroom length was 5 inches longer in the schedule

Now this is from an EA that I had thought to be up there in terms of trustworthyness (naive I know), not one of the ones that gets a bad press.

You will no doubt have read the disclaimer on all schedules, 'All areas and measurements are approximate only' etc, this allows carte blanche for these types of "mistake".

So, what a fantastic negotiating tactic I thought. View a property once, perhaps twice, negotiate a price and then ask for a final visit to check something. Go along and do all your measurements and hey presto you can then negotiate the price down further by advising that the previous price agreed was based on what you thought were accurate measurements in the schedule. Part of the valuation in property is floor space after all. This has got to be a way of getting at least a further £5K or £10K off, more if the property value is higher of course.

I'd be interested in people's thoughts and if anyone else has come accross this as it could be very commonplace!

I woud urge people to do this

PerishTHEbull

A similar thought crossed my mind only yesterday in fact. We'll be viewing properties soon and this is certainly something everyone should do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So, what a fantastic negotiating tactic I thought. View a property once, perhaps twice, negotiate a price and then ask for a final visit to check something. Go along and do all your measurements and hey presto you can then negotiate the price down further by advising that the previous price agreed was based on what you thought were accurate measurements in the schedule. Part of the valuation in property is floor space after all. This has got to be a way of getting at least a further £5K or £10K off, more if the property value is higher of course.

A cunning plan...and one I will keep in mind.

p.s. EAs really are scum aren't they. Our office administrator just had her checkout at a new build flat she rented. They want to keep all her deposit to (amongst many other similarly ridiculous things) remove the messy grouting from the bathroom floor tiles...errr...the builders did that, not the tenant. Luckily she has complete before and after photos and copies of dozens of registered letters she sent concerning the problems with the place. I have checkout on the house I was renting next week. I'm just waiting to see what they try and pull.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it's not just internal measurments.

I made an offer on a property back in April.

On the details it said it had a 1 acre paddock, plus a large garden. When I viewed the property it didn't seem like that much but the seller reassured us that it was 1.8 acres and that a friend of hers had measured it. In addition she also told the estate agent who was present that the same estate agent had marketed it at 1.8 acres many years before when she bought it.

Anyway I had my offer accepted and asked them to confirm the size of the whole plot. The estate agent siad that as far as he knew it was actually 1.5 acres but he would measure it. The plot turned out to be 0.8 acres in total including the property. When I withdrew my offer and replaced it with an accordingly lower one the estate agent said that it was sold as seen and that it was no big deal.

I explained to him that property is an asset like any other etc.

The seller refused to reduce and it still sits on the market at a grossly over-inflated asking price but with the plot sizes removed form the details on my insistence.

I then viewed a proprty which the EA insisted had a 36feet by 120feet garden. My quick measurements brought it to about 70 percent of his size.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
it's not just internal measurments.

I made an offer on a property back in April.

On the details it said it had a 1 acre paddock, plus a large garden. When I viewed the property it didn't seem like that much but the seller reassured us that it was 1.8 acres and that a friend of hers had measured it. In addition she also told the estate agent who was present that the same estate agent had marketed it at 1.8 acres many years before when she bought it.

Anyway I had my offer accepted and asked them to confirm the size of the whole plot. The estate agent siad that as far as he knew it was actually 1.5 acres but he would measure it. The plot turned out to be 0.8 acres in total including the property. When I withdrew my offer and replaced it with an accordingly lower one the estate agent said that it was sold as seen and that it was no big deal.

I explained to him that property is an asset like any other etc.

The seller refused to reduce and it still sits on the market at a grossly over-inflated asking price but with the plot sizes removed form the details on my insistence.

I then viewed a proprty which the EA insisted had a 36feet by 120feet garden. My quick measurements brought it to about 70 percent of his size.

If the 1.8 acre property is on a property search site such as Rightmove, do they have any kind of policy to report knowingly wrong information?

Its stories like these that drive the whole "EA's are shits" way of thinking. If the industry was more transparent then attitudes would change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not trying to say that EA's are shits. They are no more shits in my opinion than a veg stall owner who discretely puts a couple of rotten plums in your purchase or the restauranteur who subsidises the staff minimum wage with your tips.

In fact I feel sorry for estate agents. They are just salespeople who use the same tactics as everyone else. I think they get lots of stick from sellers and buyers because they are the easiest and often the only target for people's frustrations when things go wrong.

I'm just saying that people should double check any garden size claims made by EA's or vendors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not trying to say that EA's are shits. They are no more shits in my opinion than a veg stall owner who discretely puts a couple of rotten plums in your purchase or the restauranteur who subsidises the staff minimum wage with your tips.

In fact I feel sorry for estate agents. They are just salespeople who use the same tactics as everyone else. I think they get lots of stick from sellers and buyers because they are the easiest and often the only target for people's frustrations when things go wrong.

I'm just saying that people should double check any garden size claims made by EA's or vendors.

But they are.

We have a huge crash to prove it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 395 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.