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ReggiePerrin

Bbc Property Programmes

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link to the telegraph article

(exercise caution if you've just eaten)

I always taken the jibs here about the BBC's impartiality with a pinch of salt, I just thought they were incompetent (they are state owned), until I read this article about property programmes.

These two quotes taken from the article say it all.

Liam Keelan, head of daytime at the BBC, corroborates this, explaining how the corporation is making changes in tone to their existing programmes, and introducing a raft of new ones tailored to buyers' straitened circumstances.

"Everything we do at the moment has got to reflect what's going on," he says. "It's not that we ever said that there's money to be made out there [through property development], but now the advice within our shows is to be careful and make sure you're not overstretching yourself in the market as it stands."

later in the article.

Added to that, BBC daytime has three more property shows in development or production. Buy It, Sell It, Bank It, also slated for the autumn, will provide financial information on development opportunities for houses bought at auction.

Why don't the BBC just rebrand themselves as "Pravda"?

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I'm sure I'm not the only one who's noticed the increase in programmes based on property auctions. This is a more realistic format in the current market but even so they're struggling to film people who actually buy the property in question. Many of them are outbid when the auction starts - at least these participants aren't stupid enough to get carried away. Frankly it makes for rather dull watching. People wandering round some mouldering house, talking of ripping out the fireplace and knocking down a wall to make a kitchen/diner. Yawn.

Really it's just lazy programme making. The media executives have become used to pulling in large audiences with cheap-to-make property porn. But you can feel the energy and enthusiasm seep out of the format. The presenters are no longer breathless with expectation. As audiences fall these shows will increasingly not be recommissioned. They will be replaced with programmes illustrating how you can make your home a nicer and more environmentally-friendly (cost-saving) place to live on a modest budget.

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Guest Mr Parry
I'm sure I'm not the only one who's noticed the increase in programmes based on property auctions. This is a more realistic format in the current market but even so they're struggling to film people who actually buy the property in question. Many of them are outbid when the auction starts - at least these participants aren't stupid enough to get carried away. Frankly it makes for rather dull watching. People wandering round some mouldering house, talking of ripping out the fireplace and knocking down a wall to make a kitchen/diner. Yawn.

Really it's just lazy programme making. The media executives have become used to pulling in large audiences with cheap-to-make property porn. But you can feel the energy and enthusiasm seep out of the format. The presenters are no longer breathless with expectation. As audiences fall these shows will increasingly not be recommissioned. They will be replaced with programmes illustrating how you can make your home a nicer and more environmentally-friendly (cost-saving) place to live on a modest budget.

Or a re-make of 'The Good Life'.

This week Margo learns how to wring a chickens neck and how to pull her own carrotts!

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I always taken the jibs here about the BBC's impartiality with a pinch of salt, I just thought they were incompetent (they are state owned), until I read this article about property programmes.

Why don't the BBC just rebrand themselves as "Pravda"?

you took your time....

so why dont YOU put your money where your mouth is and stop paying the compulsory licence for this rubbish.

i havent for years. just shut the door in the face of the idiots that knock on it. simple as.

the chances of them getting a warrant are almost zero.

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you took your time....

so why dont YOU put your money where your mouth is and stop paying the compulsory licence for this rubbish.

i havent for years. just shut the door in the face of the idiots that knock on it. simple as.

the chances of them getting a warrant are almost zero.

Yeah.......'Dont Buy, Wont Buy'.

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"Added to that, BBC daytime has three more property shows in development or production. Buy It, Sell It, Bank It, also slated for the autumn, will provide financial information on development opportunities for houses bought at auction."

Well that show will be really interesting as there aren't any companies doing development finance at the moment as the banks are running from residential as fast as they can.

Who wants to lend on a nice little development project to find that the client can't sell the property or the rent falls far short of the requirement for a buy to let mortgage.

That show will never (or should I say should never) be released.

Edited by bobby9983

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Guest Mr Parry

Why don't they just stop transmitting. Think of the energy that would be saved.

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Its about time the BBC was formally investigated for this ramping of the property market. A show with a title "Buy it, Sell it, Bank it" FFS!!

It's been clear for years that many journalists and tv presenters etc have been BTL "investors". And they've used these shows to ramp up interest.

Why is no one looking into this? These people should be sacked.

It is a fundamental breach of trust, and the BBC charter to allow speculators to manipulate licence payers, and with BBC funding.

Politicians what the hell are you doing? aside from being asleep for decades!

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Buy It, Sell It, Bank It.

That they even effing considered this. Where's Alan Partridge.

Edited by Tonkers

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But to buy or not to buy will get funnier as they guess what the house is worth ,... today's last house was guessed at 195 and for sale at 225... A small but noticeable difference there.

I think they'll have to get a "sell that house with a tin of magnolia" at some point. Ann Maurice and Andrew Winters are probably rubbing their hands with glee at a stagnant market.

And researchers have been looking for groups of people looking at buying together for a new show (extended families or friends)

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you took your time....

so why dont YOU put your money where your mouth is and stop paying the compulsory licence for this rubbish.

i havent for years. just shut the door in the face of the idiots that knock on it. simple as.

the chances of them getting a warrant are almost zero.

Thanks but the only thing I put in my mouth is food, drink and my foot. I have no idea where money has been, although it's highly probable it's been within inches of someone's testicles :)

As protests go what you propose is not very effective, the person you're slamming the door on has no idea why you're doing it, they may just consider you to be a skinflint. And even if the debt collector, or whatever they're called, did know why you weren't paying the bill what difference would it make? Only if everyone stopped paying would it make any difference, and that can only happen if everyone is aware of the issue.

As already pointed out it would be far more effective if they were investigated for their role in rampant HPI, along with all the other channels. Their excuse that the programmes are made for entertainment and not to provide financial advise is laughable.

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In the interests of balance, let's add some more quotes from the article:

"Kristian Digby, presenter and erstwhile director of a host of property programes from Homefront to current BBC1 daytime hit To Buy or Not to Buy, has a case in point. Last year he was fronting the first series of BBC1's Open House, where a house is opened for a day and bids for it taken there and then, along the model used in the US and elsewhere.

"It rated well," says Digby. "The Beeb were delighted – and commissioned 40 more episodes. But as you can imagine, making it now is completely different. There's no queue outside the door this time – and the show's become far more exciting as a result. Now we have to 'bust our balls' to try everything to sell the property, when before it basically sold itself."

"And the brand-new shows Keelan's commissioned tackle the new problems head on. The most exciting is an as yet untitled week-long daytime TV "event", penciled in for this autumn. "Basically," Keelan says, "it's our definitive guide to where the property market is at the moment, whether you're buying, selling or struggling with repayments.

"The attractive sounding Axe the Agent, for transmission next year, investigates the cost-cutting merits of selling property without an estate agent. And Unsellable, a concept still in development, will see experts trying to sell properties that have already been languishing on the market for months.

"In such shows, the house becomes a home again rather than merely the investment opportunity as which, say, Channel 4's primetime stalwart Property Ladder views it. Which Kristian Digby for one believes is a move in the right direction. "Property shows need to get back to appreciating what a good home is and not mercilessly milking it for money," he says.

It's a sentiment which has the virtue of being both morally appealing and a comfort for those shouldering huge mortgages for houses they have little hope of selling."

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As already pointed out it would be far more effective if they were investigated for their role in rampant HPI, along with all the other channels. Their excuse that the programmes are made for entertainment and not to provide financial advise is laughable.

???????? TV companies make programmes not for entertainment, but to give financial advice?????

Utter twaddle.

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I still wonder why people watch property buying and selling shows. Surely buying a house is actually a lot of hassle and stress, and not a particularly enjoyable experience at all, so why watch other people doing it?

Anyone who seeks financial advice in the TV needs their head examined.

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Thanks but the only thing I put in my mouth is food, drink and my foot. I have no idea where money has been, although it's highly probable it's been within inches of someone's testicles :)

As protests go what you propose is not very effective, the person you're slamming the door on has no idea why you're doing it, they may just consider you to be a skinflint. And even if the debt collector, or whatever they're called, did know why you weren't paying the bill what difference would it make? Only if everyone stopped paying would it make any difference, and that can only happen if everyone is aware of the issue.

As already pointed out it would be far more effective if they were investigated for their role in rampant HPI, along with all the other channels. Their excuse that the programmes are made for entertainment and not to provide financial advise is laughable.

but my plan has been 100% effective. (for me anyway)

ive saved over £400.

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The only time I ever get a glimpse of these daytime property shows is if I'm doing a job at a client's house and they've got the telly on.

This was the case the other day and as I was fitting a door I watched 'House under the Hammer' out of the corner of my eye. After a few minutes I felt a strange sense of deja vu.

It turned out I'd seen it before - ages ago! The end credits confirmed that it was a repeat from 2006, yet no mention of this rather salient fact was made before, during, or after the programme.

Is this just lazy and cheap programming or a devious attempt to brainwash the great unwashed into believing that nothing has changed?

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The only time I ever get a glimpse of these daytime property shows is if I'm doing a job at a client's house and they've got the telly on.

This was the case the other day and as I was fitting a door I watched 'House under the Hammer' out of the corner of my eye. After a few minutes I felt a strange sense of deja vu.

It turned out I'd seen it before - ages ago! The end credits confirmed that it was a repeat from 2006, yet no mention of this rather salient fact was made before, during, or after the programme.

Is this just lazy and cheap programming or a devious attempt to brainwash the great unwashed into believing that nothing has changed?

i complained to the ITC about this kind of thing and my complaint WASNT upheld.

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i complained to the ITC about this kind of thing and my complaint WASNT upheld.

Not surprising, don't the TV companies pay for the ICT? If so, then you can see why they wouldn't bite the hand that feeds them.

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Not surprising, don't the TV companies pay for the ICT? If so, then you can see why they wouldn't bite the hand that feeds them.

The Independent Television Commission closed in 2003 and was replaced by OFCOM.

This is from OFCOM's website:

"We are funded by: fees from industry for regulating broadcasting and communications networks; and grant-in-aid from the Government.

We answer to the UK Parliament but we are independent of the UK Government. The Government Departments that sponsor us are the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport".

To the best of my knowledge, UK broadcasters have no option to avoid OFCOM regulation.

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The only time I ever get a glimpse of these daytime property shows is if I'm doing a job at a client's house and they've got the telly on.

This was the case the other day and as I was fitting a door I watched 'House under the Hammer' out of the corner of my eye. After a few minutes I felt a strange sense of deja vu.

It turned out I'd seen it before - ages ago! The end credits confirmed that it was a repeat from 2006, yet no mention of this rather salient fact was made before, during, or after the programme.

Is this just lazy and cheap programming or a devious attempt to brainwash the great unwashed into believing that nothing has changed?

It's lazy and cheap programming. There's a finite amount of cash available for making programmes, and it tends to get concentrated at prime-time. Daytime has relatively little money to make programmes, and repeats are almost inevitable. Personally, I'd say programmes that are about markets (whether property, antiques, used cars or the price of fish) should have a caption at the beginning saying "recorded July 2008" or whenever, repeated every ten minutes or so.

One of the sad facts about daytime property shows is they're cheap and popular, therefore there are lots of them. Most of them have a rigid format, and all the producers have to do is find the participants, the properties, and fill in the blanks. Many of them look like they were shot in one day, which is breakneck speed for a 26ish minute programme. Have you noticed the BBC one that involves the presenters muppeting around with headphones on outside a house is always filmed in the Midlands? It's because it was made by BBC Birmingham, and the budget didn't stretch to nights in Travelodges; so everything had to be within 90 minutes drive or so of Birmingham. Cheap, cheap, cheap; but they have to be cheap to get made at all.

Why are the programmes popular? Personally, I'd say it's because the British have been obsessed by houses for decades, whether in periods of HPI or not. "Lifestyle" programmes that do well usually involve a subject that most of the audience have an involvement in. Everybody needs somewhere to live, therefore there's a large potential audience interested in property shows. Most people worry about their health from time to time, so health shows do quite well. Many people cook, many buy furniture, many like going on holiday, not so many play computer games, exercise or garden. At the cheaper end of the market, programmes tend to follow those trends.

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bbc right now. time 14.28

auction ramping.

golden.

captial.

profits

bargains.

gains.

opportunity

40,000 (not bad for a days work !!)

brimming with potential winners.

grab themselves a bargain

desperate to get hands on property

limit budget to 130k

heat of the moment anything can happen

guide price - it must be that.

the bidding gets off to a flying start

130 at the front

andy steps in with his 1st bid of 135k

140k

141k ???

george and jan with offer of 141

the competition is hotting up

147 ??

its too much for george and jan

147 ?

winner clenches fist.

so after a bit of a battle andy is clearly thrilled to be the owner of this hot property

at 146 thousand £s

so a successful day for andy.

george and jan dissapointed.

i have just typed what i heard time now 14.31

and you are forced to pay for this !!!!!

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bbc right now. time 14.28

auction ramping.

and you are forced to pay for this !!!!!

Wasn't that itv?

They've got an hour long auction prog on - oh not on tday so can't see what it was called.

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It's lazy and cheap programming. There's a finite amount of cash available for making programmes, and it tends to get concentrated at prime-time. Daytime has relatively little money to make programmes, and repeats are almost inevitable. Personally, I'd say programmes that are about markets (whether property, antiques, used cars or the price of fish) should have a caption at the beginning saying "recorded July 2008" or whenever, repeated every ten minutes or so.

One of the sad facts about daytime property shows is they're cheap and popular, therefore there are lots of them. Most of them have a rigid format, and all the producers have to do is find the participants, the properties, and fill in the blanks. Many of them look like they were shot in one day, which is breakneck speed for a 26ish minute programme. Have you noticed the BBC one that involves the presenters muppeting around with headphones on outside a house is always filmed in the Midlands? It's because it was made by BBC Birmingham, and the budget didn't stretch to nights in Travelodges; so everything had to be within 90 minutes drive or so of Birmingham. Cheap, cheap, cheap; but they have to be cheap to get made at all.

Why are the programmes popular? Personally, I'd say it's because the British have been obsessed by houses for decades, whether in periods of HPI or not. "Lifestyle" programmes that do well usually involve a subject that most of the audience have an involvement in. Everybody needs somewhere to live, therefore there's a large potential audience interested in property shows. Most people worry about their health from time to time, so health shows do quite well. Many people cook, many buy furniture, many like going on holiday, not so many play computer games, exercise or garden. At the cheaper end of the market, programmes tend to follow those trends.

I'm continually dismayed that there hasn't been a mainstream programme on computer games since Gamesmaster stopped broadcasting a decade ago. Games are more popular than ever, and appealing to more people than ever before, yet they don't seem to attract any media attention that isn't about how they are apparenly polluting the minds of young people and causing them to stab each other. In turn this simply makes gamers like me turn away from TV, and spend more time playing games.

Bring back Games Master!

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  • 399 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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