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I have today. For one, on Mr Kipling's French Fancies, the blob of cream has become a lot smaller than it used to be. Next up are ready salted Chipsticks - the chipsticks are actually a lot bigger - presumably something in the cooking process that fluffs them up a bit more meaning that they don't have to put as many in a bag.

People often disregard little things like this, but I believe in an environment where inflation is clearly a lot more than the official line, we need to be aware that not only are prices going up, but the quality of the product is degrading as well.

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I have today. For one, on Mr Kipling's French Fancies, the blob of cream has become a lot smaller than it used to be. Next up are ready salted Chipsticks - the chipsticks are actually a lot bigger - presumably something in the cooking process that fluffs them up a bit more meaning that they don't have to put as many in a bag.

People often disregard little things like this, but I believe in an environment where inflation is clearly a lot more than the official line, we need to be aware that not only are prices going up, but the quality of the product is degrading as well.

If that is the extent of the problems in your life than you are indeed a lucky man

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I have today. For one, on Mr Kipling's French Fancies, the blob of cream has become a lot smaller than it used to be. Next up are ready salted Chipsticks - the chipsticks are actually a lot bigger - presumably something in the cooking process that fluffs them up a bit more meaning that they don't have to put as many in a bag.

People often disregard little things like this, but I believe in an environment where inflation is clearly a lot more than the official line, we need to be aware that not only are prices going up, but the quality of the product is degrading as well.

Significant article in today's Absurder on just such activity in the US. Article cites a number of multi-national food corps shrinking product size by as much as 10% as well as increasing prices:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2008/ju...merspending.oil

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If that is the extent of the problems in your life than you are indeed a lucky man

I never thought about it like that :blink:

But anyway, are these cost-cutting measure in order to preserve salaries or to meet the demand of increasing costs outside of the organisation.. or a bit of both? Sure, you can argue that one blob on a French Fancy maketh not the omen of doom, but combine all those blobs worldwide, and someone, somewhere, is making a big saving.. but to what end?

Protection of position or to meet increased costs?

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I have today. For one, on Mr Kipling's French Fancies, the blob of cream has become a lot smaller than it used to be. Next up are ready salted Chipsticks - the chipsticks are actually a lot bigger - presumably something in the cooking process that fluffs them up a bit more meaning that they don't have to put as many in a bag.

People often disregard little things like this, but I believe in an environment where inflation is clearly a lot more than the official line, we need to be aware that not only are prices going up, but the quality of the product is degrading as well.

yes i agree less of everything

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I have today. For one, on Mr Kipling's French Fancies, the blob of cream has become a lot smaller than it used to be. Next up are ready salted Chipsticks - the chipsticks are actually a lot bigger - presumably something in the cooking process that fluffs them up a bit more meaning that they don't have to put as many in a bag.

People often disregard little things like this, but I believe in an environment where inflation is clearly a lot more than the official line, we need to be aware that not only are prices going up, but the quality of the product is degrading as well.

In all seriousness French Fancies are nowhere near as good as they used to be.

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I'm still moaning about cans of coke being reduced from 333ml to 330ml a good few years ago. :lol:

I believe walkers crisps also went down from 30g to 28g per packet.

The amount they save on such small cuts must be huge.

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I have today. For one, on Mr Kipling's French Fancies, the blob of cream has become a lot smaller than it used to be.

On a similar theme I was wondering what the effect of the imminent collapse of Freddie and Fanny would have on the western world if the US government don’t step in. If a crises can be avoided than hopefully they can then deal with the diminishing cream on Mr Kipplings exceedingly good (and expensive) cakes

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I'm still moaning about cans of coke being reduced from 333ml to 330ml a good few years ago. :lol:

I believe walkers crisps also went down from 30g to 28g per packet.

The amount they save on such small cuts must be huge.

Multi-pack bags have been 25g for ages. Annoying!

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read a really interesting article on this a year or so ago i can't recall the source though. It was on "value engineering" the secret inflation. Worth a google.

.

St

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Yep, this has been done for centuries. As soon as commodity / raw material prices rise, food manufacturers start to adulterate their products. Whereas hundreds of years ago it was substituting flour in bread for a certain amount of sawdust, today we we substitute expensive sugar with corn syrup (glucose-fructose syrup) and fill food full of additives and flavour enhancers.

There's quite an interesting examination of this in Richard Douthwaite's book the "Growth Illusion". The RPI/CPI only looks at the prices of a loaf of bread fro one year to the next, not the overall quality. This chaper then leads into another chapter discussing how health has deteriorated since the 1970s - the implication being that all these extra additives are not doing us much good. When you look at how many kids have asthma these days, the figures are truly shocking!

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Yep, this has been done for centuries. As soon as commodity / raw material prices rise, food manufacturers start to adulterate their products. Whereas hundreds of years ago it was substituting flour in bread for a certain amount of sawdust, today we we substitute expensive sugar with corn syrup (glucose-fructose syrup) and fill food full of additives and flavour enhancers.

There's quite an interesting examination of this in Richard Douthwaite's book the "Growth Illusion". The RPI/CPI only looks at the prices of a loaf of bread fro one year to the next, not the overall quality. This chaper then leads into another chapter discussing how health has deteriorated since the 1970s - the implication being that all these extra additives are not doing us much good. When you look at how many kids have asthma these days, the figures are truly shocking!

But when you look at the size of the fat little fVckers there's no growth illusion there - some of them look as though they've been on the same diet as geese for pate de-fois gras.

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But when you look at the size of the fat little fVckers there's no growth illusion there - some of them look as though they've been on the same diet as geese for pate de-fois gras.

But when you look at the number of calories that people on average consume now compared to the 1950s-70s it's quite significantly less.

Now added to the fact that the fat little fVckers don't play out anymore and get driven everywhere- no doubt including to their friends house so they can sit on the sofa watching TV, eating Pringles and getting wired on fizzy pop, the unnatural nature of our food has probably made matters worse!

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Asthma is a consequence of the NHS. A human female should have six or seven babies with half of them, the unfit ones, dying. In Britain today people only have one baby which, if it is sickly, is kept alive through technology. Look at how ugly and diseased the people in Britain look compared to say, Thailand. Compulsory altruism destroys your society.

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Asthma is a consequence of the NHS. A human female should have six or seven babies with half of them, the unfit ones, dying. In Britain today people only have one baby which, if it is sickly, is kept alive through technology. Look at how ugly and diseased the people in Britain look compared to say, Thailand. Compulsory altruism destroys your society.

When I was a kid few kids died and I only knew one kid with asthma - still we put her out of her sickly, wheezing misery by by burying her in the sandpit!

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But when you look at the number of calories that people on average consume now compared to the 1950s-70s it's quite significantly less.

Now added to the fact that the fat little fVckers don't play out anymore and get driven everywhere- no doubt including to their friends house so they can sit on the sofa watching TV, eating Pringles and getting wired on fizzy pop, the unnatural nature of our food has probably made matters worse!

Certainly, whichever way you dress it up obesity is the result of consuming more foodstuff than the body burns.

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I am writing this as an irate stay at home dad. My daughter has been fed on Farley's milk (made by Heinz) since she came off the breast. Heinz have just relaunched Farley's milk only now it is called Heinz Nurture - I have just returned from Tesco's, whereas Farley's milk was £4.99 for a 900g tin the 'new' Heinz Nurture is £7.99 for a 900g tin - an increase of 60%.

I have just got off the phone from the Heinz careline where I queried what was 'new' in the product - the representative I spoke to told me it was "exactly the same as the old Farley's but has 3 new ingredients - specifically some extra vitamins and something to counter constipation and make it closer to breast milk"

I queried what these ingredients are to justify an extra £3 per tin but wasn't given an answer

I then said that it felt to me like either Tesco or Heinz were profiteering by introducing big price rises under the auspices of generally high inflation to be told that "the product has been re-launched as a 'premium baby milk' and that they were sorry if I felt I could 'no longer afford it'" Which got my goat somewhat.

Massive own goal for Heinz really - Farley's milk was one of the cheapest on the market, some of the MILF's at Mum and Tots are boycotting all Heinz products! I even mentioned this to the guy on the 'careline' (eg. ring us, we'll prove that we really don't care...) I told him that whilst I may only have say 6 months of buying baby milk left I have a whole lifetime of buying heinz products.

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On a similar theme I was wondering what the effect of the imminent collapse of Freddie and Fanny would have on the western world if the US government don’t step in. If a crises can be avoided than hopefully they can then deal with the diminishing cream on Mr Kipplings exceedingly good (and expensive) cakes

Mr Kipling makes exceedingly small cakes IMO. They must have a modeling agency supplying them with people with mutant small hands for their advertising pictures. When I get them out of the box they're about half the size I'm expecting from the pictures.

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Guest Mr Parry
Asthma is a consequence of the NHS. A human female should have six or seven babies with half of them, the unfit ones, dying. In Britain today people only have one baby which, if it is sickly, is kept alive through technology. Look at how ugly and diseased the people in Britain look compared to say, Thailand. Compulsory altruism destroys your society.

True to an extent. But people here are certainly getting fatter. Take my wife, no please. (I take my wife everywhere, but she finds her way back home.)

The old woman has balloned from 45 kgs to over 70 kgs in the last two years.

The big problem here is diabetes. The nice lady from next door died from a blood sugar count of 18 last week. Sticky rice is carb central and meat products because of the expense are substituted with sugary diets. Hell, even a loaf of bread here is loaded with sugar - 20% in most cases. Sugsr is still cheap, it's high energy is an attractive yet often deadly option.

But yes, Thais do look and generally are healthier than Brits.

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Asthma is a consequence of the NHS. A human female should have six or seven babies with half of them, the unfit ones, dying. In Britain today people only have one baby which, if it is sickly, is kept alive through technology. Look at how ugly and diseased the people in Britain look compared to say, Thailand. Compulsory altruism destroys your society.

Bl**dy hell, that's a bit harsh! Anyway, from what I recall, most kids today in the UK look a lot healthier than the ones of 40 years ago.

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  • 399 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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