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Save Money On Food - Grow Your Own & Spend £850,000

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Guest Shedfish

i would love to grow my own food, however since i live in a rented flat because i can't afford a house with a garden any time soon, i will just have to keep on buying the stuff from shops and trying to time it so none gets thrown away, lest i incur the wrath of Trash Gordon

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I tried growing some tomatoes once. The plants were free, the growbag 99p and the liquid feed more expensive. I got a total of five tomatoes but they failed to turn red and tasted horrible!

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i would love to grow my own food, however since i live in a rented flat because i can't afford a house with a garden any time soon, i will just have to keep on buying the stuff from shops and trying to time it so none gets thrown away, lest i incur the wrath of Trash Gordon

self sufficiency is 24/7 -365 days a year

not for the faint hearted

nothing better than eating your own self produced food

thats if you can stop all the slugs greenfly etc from eating it 1st

without EEC subsidies its almost impossible to make a profit

and these are not available to the general smallholder

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This is just the non-home counties version of those yummy-mummy "hobby businesses" (you know the ones, "Martha's Organic Toys", "The Millinghurstfold Ethnic Interior Decor Boutique", that sort of thing...) that are only viable in a "lifestyle" sense, not a genuine "make a living" sense, isn't it?

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i would love to grow my own food, however since i live in a rented flat because i can't afford a house with a garden any time soon, i will just have to keep on buying the stuff from shops and trying to time it so none gets thrown away, lest i incur the wrath of Trash Gordon

Have you got a communal garden? We have and, since we weeded most of the beds, no-one complains about the fact that we grow tomatoes, potatoes courgettes and herbs in part of it.

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self sufficiency is 24/7 -365 days a year

not for the faint hearted

nothing better than eating your own self produced food

thats if you can stop all the slugs greenfly etc from eating it 1st

without EEC subsidies its almost impossible to make a profit

and these are not available to the general smallholder

That's how it is now, but in the near future? It is the virtually free energy, oil, of the past few decades that has made competition in the food market so aggressive and brought the price down.

As you say, growing your own is not easy and takes years of experience to get right.

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I tried growing some tomatoes once. The plants were free, the growbag 99p and the liquid feed more expensive. I got a total of five tomatoes but they failed to turn red and tasted horrible!

You're supposed to make green tomato chutney with those that don't ripen. Your local Women's Institute will have a recipe.

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All those "exotic" and out of season fruit and veg prices are rocketing as inflation and fuel hikes take their toll. Maybe we'll see a return to locally grown and seasonal produce again in the shops? It would be great if it happened but Joe Public might need some time to adjust. ie. anyone under 30yrs old may soon be shocked to find that avacados in January are a no-no unless he goes to a specialist store or is willing to pay £2 a piece. How long would Tesco's stock it at that price ?

For me, I have 2 months of tomatoes now ripening, just finished a month of apricots and have 12 pots of jam to see me through till Christmas. Salad is so easy to grow that I give it away to the neighbours....who return the favour by giving me sack loads of lemons. We use these to make jams and squashes for the summer and add to the g and t's :)

Just bought a 5kg tray of peaches from a local seller. These are the ones that are not the correct shape for the supermarkets or that have small blemishes that the likes of Tesco, asda etc hate. Paid 5€ for the lot. There's about 24 per tray. Also got 7 melons for 2€. Bargain of the weekend :D

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/main.j....xml&page=2

Yeah, OK. Save money on food by growing your own veg, eggs, even pigs. But spending £850,000 in order so to do...?

Seems to have quite a bit of income potential on top of the self-sufficiency aspect:

- 20 acres is a lot more than you need to grow your own food, presumably can be rented to local farmers

- the b&b reportedly brings in 60k (I wonder if that's gross or net, or sustainable in a downturn, but still...)

- the bunkhouse for walkers is another income-generating asset (could be used to house peasants in future ;))

- they apparently get agricultural subsidies.

Not sure about the wisdom of naming the kid after the farm, though, the poor kid is now essentially called 'White Field' :lol:

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Guest Shedfish
Have you got a communal garden? We have and, since we weeded most of the beds, no-one complains about the fact that we grow tomatoes, potatoes courgettes and herbs in part of it.

unfortunately not - ironically i'm quite green fingered too. somewhat frustrating... the main frustration of not owning, in fact. Gardeners' Question Time fills me with a quiet but powerful rage

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Since all new builds come with post stamp size plots then how would people go about growing their own food and if they ask for allotments from the local council then they will be on the end of a very long waiting list unless they know someone.

Having a real chimmney may soon prove a usefull asset if gas keeps going up and builders might gain employment by converting all them open plan lounges back to single rooms.

Buying a electrical generator could be one of your best moves if people switch over to electic heating as the national grid can hardly hold as it is

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Since all new builds come with post stamp size plots then how would people go about growing their own food and if they ask for allotments from the local council then they will be on the end of a very long waiting list unless they know someone.

Having a real chimmney may soon prove a usefull asset if gas keeps going up and builders might gain employment by converting all them open plan lounges back to single rooms.

Buying a electrical generator could be one of your best moves if people switch over to electic heating as the national grid can hardly hold as it is

Even a small garden can give a very good yield of potatoes, onions , lettuce etc. - but these are unfashionable foods and the majority wouldn't know what to do with them in their raw state. No doubt they'd bin them as they didn't look like the stuff sold in their local supermarket............

(eg. a spud with earth on it? Ugh !!!) :D

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Got my allotment last week, hours of backbreaking work later I've got a couple of 10x10 plots planted with all the expensive stuff we buy. Still only dug over about a quarter of the total plot so plenty to do. Slightly late to get in on the action this season, but next year will be a blinder.

Oh yes £20 per year for the allotment!!

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Got my allotment last week, hours of backbreaking work later I've got a couple of 10x10 plots planted with all the expensive stuff we buy. Still only dug over about a quarter of the total plot so plenty to do. Slightly late to get in on the action this season, but next year will be a blinder.

Oh yes £20 per year for the allotment!!

Not thought about no-dig?

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Got my allotment last week, hours of backbreaking work later I've got a couple of 10x10 plots planted with all the expensive stuff we buy. Still only dug over about a quarter of the total plot so plenty to do. Slightly late to get in on the action this season, but next year will be a blinder.

Oh yes £20 per year for the allotment!!

Think of it as £20 well spent! How much would gym membership cost - £30 a month.

I'd much rather be outside with the birds and the bees than in a sweaty gym. Jeez give me the smell of fresh horse muck anyday over sweaty trainers and BO.

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That's very interesting. What happens if you get down the council and they say they do provide alotments, but there's an eight year wait?

You can in theory force them to make extra land available. One nearest me has as many people on the list as plots - so it'll be a cold day in hell before I get one.

They have been trying to get extra land but despite there being shed loads of it next to their site they aint got none yet.

And the council is threatening to put the rents up.

My nearest allotments are actually in Manchester but I can't have one of them cos they don't share over the border. Sadly Oldham allow anyone to put their name on the list (and several on the nearest oldham site are not from Oldham)

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You don't need the 20 acres mentioned in the article to grow your own veg. You can do that with an acre. They had a flock of sheep though. The thing about growing your own veg is preservation. Most houses don't have root cellars anymore where you can store them in decent condition. You would want a potato crop to last until next year for example but this wont happen without ideal storage conditions. You are going to have to learn about all the old methods of preserving crops. You could use modern methods such as chest freezers powered by solar cells too.

Assuming you don't want to be a vegetarian the next step up is chickens. They take very little maintenance or space and provide you with eggs and the occasional meat. After that you get a goat, easy to feed and you get milk and you can store it as cheese. As soon as you starting farming animals for meat you are into a lot of land and work.

Grains are the next problem. You can grow corn easy enough and eat it on the cob. But if you want wheat you need to get handy with a scythe, be able to thresh it and have some sort of hand mill to make your flour for bread. If you are going to so this you want some of the old rusting farm gear from yesteryear. I expect there are still places you can buy plough horses, but then you need to learn about horse care, muck spreading, plaughing, harrowing etc.

The more independent you try to become the harder it gets.

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Guest happy?
Got my allotment last week, hours of backbreaking work later I've got a couple of 10x10 plots planted with all the expensive stuff we buy. Still only dug over about a quarter of the total plot so plenty to do. Slightly late to get in on the action this season, but next year will be a blinder.

Oh yes £20 per year for the allotment!!

I recommend potatoes, sweetcorn and rhubarb. These are fully capable of looking after themselves with only a little intervention, take-up a maximum of space and consequently look as though you've done far more work than you actually have.

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You don't need the 20 acres mentioned in the article to grow your own veg. You can do that with an acre. They had a flock of sheep though. The thing about growing your own veg is preservation. Most houses don't have root cellars anymore where you can store them in decent condition. You would want a potato crop to last until next year for example but this wont happen without ideal storage conditions. You are going to have to learn about all the old methods of preserving crops. You could use modern methods such as chest freezers powered by solar cells too.

Assuming you don't want to be a vegetarian the next step up is chickens. They take very little maintenance or space and provide you with eggs and the occasional meat. After that you get a goat, easy to feed and you get milk and you can store it as cheese. As soon as you starting farming animals for meat you are into a lot of land and work.

Grains are the next problem. You can grow corn easy enough and eat it on the cob. But if you want wheat you need to get handy with a scythe, be able to thresh it and have some sort of hand mill to make your flour for bread. If you are going to so this you want some of the old rusting farm gear from yesteryear. I expect there are still places you can buy plough horses, but then you need to learn about horse care, muck spreading, plaughing, harrowing etc.

The more independent you try to become the harder it gets.

Self sufficiency is something clueless townies think they can just "get into". Self sufficiency includes being able to do your own electrics, plumbing, building and mechanical repairs for starters. Then you need to know basic scientific principles before you lean the practical science of agriculture, which will take half a lifetime. After you have acquired these skills you may have a shot at producing 50% of your families food requirement.

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I recommend potatoes, sweetcorn and rhubarb. These are fully capable of looking after themselves with only a little intervention, take-up a maximum of space and consequently look as though you've done far more work than you actually have.

I think that's what a lot of people do for sure, but as I am doing this partly to save my very expensive trips to Chinatown, I'll be sticking to the exotics, chillies, aubergines, peppers, pak choi etc!!

Anyways spuds are way too much work for a few quid saved

:D

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  • 396 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
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      • up 5%



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