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OzzMosiz

< £800pm And Possibly Homeless

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I know someone who's girlfriend has just passed away. She owned the house. He's lived there for 10+ years.

Looking likely that the house will be inherited by her son. Now this person I know, is 57 and doesn't earn a great deal, and had issues getting the job they are in (800pcm take home).

Any options for said person? I'm seriously worried.

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I know someone who's girlfriend has just passed away. She owned the house. He's lived there for 10+ years.

Looking likely that the house will be inherited by her son. Now this person I know, is 57 and doesn't earn a great deal, and had issues getting the job they are in (800pcm take home).

Any options for said person? I'm seriously worried.

Can he apply to his council for housing, as he will be made unitentionally homeless?

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council and/or remaining family are his only hope.

could probably see if he can swindle his job firing him to boost his chances too.

social housing becomes more likely if you have no job too.

if he gets 800, he could rent somewhere for maybe 400, get tax credits etc. to make his ratio maybe 40:60 on rent.

though obs that is all dependent on where he is.

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council and/or remaining family are his only hope.

could probably see if he can swindle his job firing him to boost his chances too.

social housing becomes more likely if you have no job too.

if he gets 800, he could rent somewhere for maybe 400, get tax credits etc. to make his ratio maybe 40:60 on rent.

though obs that is all dependent on where he is.

AFAIK Single Blokes/couples without kids don't get any tax credits.

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He might be eligible for housing benefit, and he could try going to a Citizens Advice Bureau who deal with this type of problem all the time, I believe. Social housing is worth trying for, as others have said.

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you sure on that :unsure:

there is a website you can go on to see if you qualify and being single is an option.

i reckon he'd get something, maybe 20 quid p/w, better than nowt tho.

btw, i cannot be arsed to search for aforementioned site.

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He can probably rent a room for 80/ week and have nothing left after food and bills, some life but if thats his only option I guess he will have to either rely on family or go with it.

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He can probably rent a room for 80/ week and have nothing left after food and bills, some life but if thats his only option I guess he will have to either rely on family or go with it.

this is why i posted as it's exactly how i am living right now. bit more than 800pm but after bills, food and misc i'm wiped out. however the gf is out of a job, and state support, despite her previously working, is zero quid, which is why i/we are so skint.

so basically not a lot of life but i still have the internet, learning new skills (force learning :lol: ) and pride.

though the government are eroding that latter one as much as they can.

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He is probably entitled to some of the house, especially if he has been contributing for the last 10 years. Could be a painful process seeing it through if he doesn't get on with the son.

edit = splelling and grammar

Edited by worzel

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He is probably entitled to some of the house, especially if he has been contributing for the last 10 years. Could be a painful process seeing it through if he doesn't get on with the son.

edit = splelling and grammar

I agree, he needs to get some legal advise, from CAB if he can't afford a solicitor, if he's been in a long term relationship and contributed to the house. Being single he'll be bottom of the pile for council accomodation/social housing and won't get tax credits. In fact he'll be killed in the rush from those who have been in the country for five minutes, but have kids.

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A work collegue is in a similar situation,

their take home pay is £800pcm

found out from http://www.entitledto.co.uk/ that they are able to get £360pcm in housing benefit

topping this up means they can get a descent 1 bed flat with garage, close to town and work.

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Firstly, I am sorry to hear about your friend's loss. He will be going through utter despair at this time and so will his girlfriend's son.

It is important that they have good friends to be there for them and to listen to them.

It is important at this time that both he and the son share their grief and their love, and remember all the good, happy times, with their girlfriend/mother.

I hope no one - and I am not talking about you but am talking about anyone who knows them - tries to interfere and 'stir things up' between them however well-intentioned, or even malcious, that advice might be.

Elisabeth Kübler-Ross is considered the World's leading expert on death and dying. She has excellent advice for friends of bereaved people over at http://www.davidkessler.org/ - perhaps you could have a read through the advice on that site in order to help your friend?

Now to your question. This is a difficult one to advise on for a variety of reasons - but mainly because I am not a solicitor who specialises in probate so take anything I say with a big pinch of salt. As any good probate solicitor will tell you - where there's a will there's a relative!

Firstly, how old is the son? Is he 18 or over? Is his biological Father still alive? Are his maternal grand-parents alive? Aunts, uncles on his Mum's side? Are they alive too? Does he have other siblings - brothers, sisters?

Did his Mother leave a will? If so, to whom did she leave her estate? Where is that will now?

How does your friend get on with his girlfriend's son - good, loving father/son relationship, hate each other or something in between?

How sound financially is the son? Does he need the money? Does he want the house? Would he need to sell the house?

Where does the son live?

Where does your friend live - in the house I imagine? It is his 'home' at the end of the day and the courts will take that into account I believe.

Why does your friend assume he will be left out on the street and get nothing? Has he been told this? Or are you just guessing this? After all, didn't his girlfriend love him and they effectively lived together as man and wife for at least 10 years together?

Your friend has been co-habiting with his girlfriend for over 10 years which means, in the eyes of the law, they are a co-habiting couple. This area is a very grey area and open to interpretation by the courts. I assume he has been paying bills there, sharing in costs, expenses and to all intents and purposes they have been living as a couple.

Under law it is not always black and white who gets what without a will. When there is a will there are very strict guidelines on who can challenge a will, how they can challenge a will and in what time-frame they have to challenge a will. Challenging a will is an expensive, vicious and time-consuming process.

If his girlfriend left her estate to her son in a will then no one should interfere with that. The court does not like people challenging wills because they have seen greed so many times - and the judges do not like it.

If his girlfriend did not leave a will then it is not automatic that the son would get the estate.

Without a will the estate would go to probate and certain people - spouses, children, former spouses, children of former spouses, those financially dependent upon the deceased such as an older infirm relative or a disabled partner - can make a claim against the estate. The same people can also challenge a will when there is a will. You can find such information freely available on the 'net.

Destroying a will is a serious criminal offence. It is also, IMPO, immoral.

Your friend and his girlfriend's son might come to an arrangement now whereby he lives in the house until he dies and then the son inherits it from him. Of course, such a verbal agreement is not worth the paper it is not written on and can all sorts of problems for the future.

Your friend could challenge his girlfriend's estate and the court of probate might award him all or part of the estate. It is also in the court's power to enforce an agreement, such as the above, whereby he lives in the house for the rest of his days and upon his death the house goes to the girlfriend's son. It can all get very messy and very nasty though.

I would imagine the first thing is for your friend and his girlfriend's son to be allowed time to grieve - be there for them.

Next, they need to sit down and have a long talk about the girlfriend's/Mum's estate and work out what they want to do. Anything they decide to do will have to be done through a solicitor and both should really seek the advice of a good probate solicitor to draw any agreements up formally when the estate goes to the court of probate.

If there is the slightest hint that this is going to get nasty it becomes like a divorce and all interested parties should, alas, immediately seek the advice and counsel of their own probate solicitors. There is a thing called a 'caveat' which you can put on an estate - I think it only costs a tenner and lasts for 6 months - blocking the court from discharging the estate to whoever. However, you have to have a valid reason to do so.

I am not a solicitor. These are just my thoughts off the top of my head. Your friend needs to talk to a good probate solicitor really... as does his girlfriend's son.

I do hope they can settle this amicably though. Otherwise, the pain of their grief will become a nasty, vicious kind of pain which will ultimately only result in the solicitor's making a great deal of money and the memory of this woman becoming surrounded by ill feeling. You would be surprised how many people spend all the entire estate that they are fighting to claim a part of on legal fees.

Again, I am not a solicitor and this is not legal advice - just random thoughts. Now, go visit that website and have a read about how you can help people who are grieving. :)

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Housing for single men is very limited, unless you are gay, or from some other minority. Islington housing policy anyway! So not much hope for getting council housing I'm afraid

Edited by unclefudgly

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Now to your question. This is a difficult one to advise on for a variety of reasons - but mainly because I am not a solicitor who specialises in probate so take anything I say with a big pinch of salt. As any good probate solicitor will tell you - where there's a will there's a relative!

I am not a solicitor. These are just my thoughts off the top of my head. Your friend needs to talk to a good probate solicitor really... as does his girlfriend's son.

I do hope they can settle this amicably though. Otherwise, the pain of their grief will become a nasty, vicious kind of pain which will ultimately only result in the solicitor's making a great deal of money and the memory of this woman becoming surrounded by ill feeling. You would be surprised how many people spend all the entire estate that they are fighting to claim a part of on legal fees.

Again, I am not a solicitor and this is not legal advice - just random thoughts. Now, go visit that website and have a read about how you can help people who are grieving. :)

Excellent and humane post, covering the lot, really. 'Due provision' is a phrase the OP may care to investigate if the couple were together for 10 years.

As regards getting solicitors involved, my solicitor recently charged £150 per hour to settle probate after a death - thank God it only took 8 hours of his time!

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  • 399 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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