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gruffydd

Food Prices Pushed Up 75% By Biofuels

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008...renewableenergy

Biofuels have forced global food prices up by 75% - far more than previously estimated - according to a confidential World Bank report obtained by the Guardian.

The damning unpublished assessment is based on the most detailed analysis of the crisis so far, carried out by an internationally-respected economist at global financial body.

The figure emphatically contradicts the US government's claims that plant-derived fuels contribute less than 3% to food-price rises. It will add to pressure on governments in Washington and across Europe, which have turned to plant-derived fuels to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and reduce their dependence on imported oil.

And

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008...carbonemissions

Britain's greenhouse gas emissions are higher than official figures suggest, the government has admitted.

The environment department Defra says UK emissions are higher than previously stated if carbon pollution linked to imported goods is included. Official figures only count direct emissions within national boundaries, so miss out the carbon cost of goods manufactured elsewhere.

A report this week from several international groups says carbon dioxide emissions associated with UK consumption grew 18% between 1992 and 2004, once these imports are accounted for. Official figures show UK CO2 pollution falling 5% over that period

The environment secretary, Hilary Benn, said: "Under international climate change agreements, we only have direct influence over our domestic emissions – and they are, and will remain, the basis for these commitments.

In December, a team of economists led by Dieter Helm at Oxford University, said UK progress on cutting greenhouse gases was an "illusion". Counting pollution from aviation, shipping, overseas trade and tourism, which are not measured in the official figures, meant that emissions of UK greenhouse gases – not just CO2 – have risen 19% since 1990.

Edited by gruffydd

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008...renewableenergy

Biofuels have forced global food prices up by 75% - far more than previously estimated - according to a confidential World Bank report obtained by the Guardian.

The damning unpublished assessment is based on the most detailed analysis of the crisis so far, carried out by an internationally-respected economist at global financial body.

The figure emphatically contradicts the US government's claims that plant-derived fuels contribute less than 3% to food-price rises. It will add to pressure on governments in Washington and across Europe, which have turned to plant-derived fuels to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and reduce their dependence on imported oil.

And

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008...carbonemissions

Britain's greenhouse gas emissions are higher than official figures suggest, the government has admitted.

The environment department Defra says UK emissions are higher than previously stated if carbon pollution linked to imported goods is included. Official figures only count direct emissions within national boundaries, so miss out the carbon cost of goods manufactured elsewhere.

A report this week from several international groups says carbon dioxide emissions associated with UK consumption grew 18% between 1992 and 2004, once these imports are accounted for. Official figures show UK CO2 pollution falling 5% over that period

The environment secretary, Hilary Benn, said: "Under international climate change agreements, we only have direct influence over our domestic emissions – and they are, and will remain, the basis for these commitments.

In December, a team of economists led by Dieter Helm at Oxford University, said UK progress on cutting greenhouse gases was an "illusion". Counting pollution from aviation, shipping, overseas trade and tourism, which are not measured in the official figures, meant that emissions of UK greenhouse gases – not just CO2 – have risen 19% since 1990.

Interesting articles but I think the role of the long rise in oil and gas prices, necessary for pesticides, fertilisers, transport and irrigation, has played the major part in food price rises.

And much of the reduction in CO2 emissions was due to the "dash for gas" in electicity generation a decade ago, which doesn't seem to have made sense, given current gas prices and increasing dependence on Russia.

Edited by 1929crash

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That's nonsense. It's significant, but there's no way in hell it is responsible for 75% alone.

Just that demand rose faster than supply could catch up, clearly not a linear relationship between the two, (just like oil) fortunatly its a lot easier to grow additional corn, (relatively) and good news is that the beneficiaries will be farmers, assuming that they can still turn a profit given higher costs. Perhaps its time we looked at reducing the massive subs we all pay to agriculture sector.

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Interesting. Although it doesn't make any mention of how much higher the price of oil would be if there was no bio-fuel. Peak everything.

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Just that demand rose faster than supply could catch up, clearly not a linear relationship between the two, (just like oil) fortunatly its a lot easier to grow additional corn, (relatively) and good news is that the beneficiaries will be farmers, assuming that they can still turn a profit given higher costs. Perhaps its time we looked at reducing the massive subs we all pay to agriculture sector.

The beneficiaries are not necessarily the farmers. The supermarkets use their market power to bully farmers into accepting a less-than-fair-price.

UK farmers are Tesco's Kulaks.

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The beneficiaries are not necessarily the farmers. The supermarkets use their market power to bully farmers into accepting a less-than-fair-price.

UK farmers are Tesco's Kulaks.

Yep but it might piss the French off so its got to be worth it...

:P

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Yep but it might piss the French off so its got to be worth it...

:P

Any other time perhaps, but with our troops in Kosovo, Iraq, Sierra Leone, Afghanistan we are too overstretched to resist the French farmers.

Maybe we need to recruit a special BTL landlord regiment.

Edited by 1929crash

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Any other time perhaps, but with our troops in Kosovo, Iraq, Sierra Leone, Afghanistan we are too overstreched to resist the French farmers.

Maybe we need to recruit a special BTL landlord regiment.

Perhaps utilising all the bankrupted pub landlords on the dole, in the uk economic slump, while

taking a lesson from Sadam Hussain.

'They have yet to face the 'elite repo'd publican guard'

;)

..as Bill Hill says in the truth about the Iraq War (1)..

:lol:

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  • 395 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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