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Public Sector Pension Bill (£43,000 Per Household)

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House prices and negative equity are just the tip of the iceberg. We really are bancrupt as a nation.

City wire

the overall number of people accruing company pensions in our country today has dropped to an all time low of just 8.8 million people from a working population of about 29 million., Worse still, only 3.6 million of the 8.8 million employees work in the private sector.
If funds were in place to back the public sector pensions that have been promised to date we would need over one thousand billion pounds put aside. That equates to about £43,000 for every household in the UK today. I’d hazard a guess that £43,000 is more than your average household would have hanging around the place, but I don’t have any inside information on that. I know we haven’t got that much in the emergency money tin we keep in the hall at home, but I can’t speak for anyone else.

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House prices and negative equity are just the tip of the iceberg. We really are bancrupt as a nation.

City wire

Ace.

And on another thread I've got a numpty trying to take the michael because I said I think the state is going to collapse. :rolleyes:

This isn't ever getting paid, ever - save in Zimbabwe style banknotes.

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Just think all them policemen that are doing the goverments dirty work that think they are going to be rewareded in old age will find that they are very much mistaken.

Currently 2/3 of policemen retire by the age of 50 due to poor health !

Time they investigated themselves i thinks

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My step uncle enjoyed a career in the South Wales Police, rising from the lowly ranks through to Inspector. Physically he is a very big man indeed, a proper alpha male and former rugby international - his presence sobers up most people. His son is just the same - all testosterone and no fear.

That family used to live several doors down from my parents but by a combination of favourable factors, they went from a two-up two-down suburban semi to a large detached secluded house in several acres of land in an exclusive area of the very desirable Vale of Glamorgan. The property they own must now be worth well in excess of a million pounds. Not bad for a humble copper, hey?

Recently, my step aunt a former nurse said to my mother with easy nonchalance "Millionaires are two a penny these days".

How then did my step-uncle manage to upgrade from suburban mediocrity to plush country pad so nicely?

Easy: He built a massive great extension on the side of the house, knocking into a much bigger property. Fair enough, he did the building work himself - probably to save builders fees. But how did he get planning permission when neighbours were denied it? Masonic influence by any chance, old boy?

Until about the age of 12, when they moved away, I got on well with my cousin, as you do at such a naive age. Then all the contact stopped and we went our separate ways. Years then past. I graduated and started studying for professional exams. My cousin followed his father in to the force, like father like son. He was never the academic type, he was only ever going to be a job that required physicality.

My father - who has no connection with my step uncle's family except through my mother - never really liked them and its easy to see why.

The only time I ever had any contact with that family was for family reasons - marriages or funerals - otherwise I stay well away. Their wedding ceremonies tended to be conspicuously massive, lavish, grandiose affairs, no expenses spared with huge country houses hired for the occasion and hundreds of guests. It was at such occasions I started to realise what sort of a world these people were living in. It didn't take a rocket scientist to realise there was and is now a great deal of masonic schenanigans in play - the mafia of the mediocre.

All of my step uncle's family are public sector employees. None of them work in the private sector. All four of my step cousins (his children) married public sector employees - more police, nurses and teachers. That family remind me very much of the Corleone's in The Godfather, except they wear the uniforms. Their expolitation of he public purse verges on the criminal with behaviour like nepotism, corruption and cronyism, but have carefully cloaked themselves under the righteous veil of being the police.

Its very clear to anyone who looks that they have had their snouts in the trough taking the public purse for everything they can get, in the knowledge the old boys network will protect them. Their protected plunder has made them unbearably smug and cocky and that's why I don't like mixing with them. Its very evident one of their biggest motivations for joining the police is the short service pension - where you serve a short career and walk away with a very comfortable pension from your mid-forties. Other attractions are the expenses they can claim.

Before my grandfather's death, he became irate at their constant visits. My grandfather lived on one of the main roads west out of Cardiff and that gave them a very convenient excuse to drop by on their way home in The Vale. My parents lived only 100 yards away. Only once in blue moon did they ever drop by to see them. For my poor grandfather, never a day went by without at least one visit from them, often it was three or four visits, sometimes it was a dozen. Reason? Did an inheritance have anything to do with it? You bet it did. They were currying favour.

Eventually their constant, mercillessly-repetitive pandering angered my grandfather. By contrast, me and my two brothers wouldn't visit our own grandfather because we knew our uber-aggressive, uber-domineering step uncle's family would turn up, guaranteed to take control of the situation leaving us to be ignored. My grandfather became upset he rarely saw his own blood grandchildren thanks to the selfishness of his step grandchildren. The result was that on his death my mother got half his estate - not the quarter she expected.

My mother's sister had passed away some years before and we expected my grandfather to divide his estate up into 3 instead of 4; one third for my mother and the other two thirds for my mother two step sisters.

Justice prevailed and my grandfather took what little retribution he could by denying the scheming sociopaths what the plunder they'd been wringing their hands over all those years. Good on him and may God rest his soul.

Anyone who has seen the TV series Dexter may recognise some of what I've mentioned here - manipulating the sanctity of your choosen profession's aura to conduct clandestine schemes in diametric opposition to your profession's purpose. I don't think a word yet exists to describe this phenomenon does, there?

Edited by Dave Spart

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My step uncle enjoyed a career in the South Wales Police, rising from the lowly ranks through to Inspector. Physically he is a very big man indeed, a proper alpha male and former rugby international - his presence sobers up most people. His son is just the same - all testosterone and no fear.

That family used to live several doors down from my parents but by a combination of favourable factors, they went from a two-up two-down suburban semi to a large detached secluded house in several acres of land in an exclusive area of the very desirable Vale of Glamorgan. The property they own must now be worth well in excess of a million pounds. Not bad for a humble copper, hey?

Recently, my step aunt a former nurse said to my mother with easy nonchalance "Millionaires are two a penny these days".

How then did my step-uncle manage to upgrade from suburban mediocrity to plush country pad so nicely?

Easy: He built a massive great extension on the side of the house, knocking into a much bigger property. Fair enough, he did the building work himself - probably to save builders fees. But how did he get planning permission when neighbours were denied it? Masonic influence by any chance, old boy?

Until about the age of 12, when they moved away, I got on well with my cousin, as you do at such a naive age. Then all the contact stopped and we went our separate ways. Years then past. I graduated and started studying for professional exams. My cousin followed his father in to the force, like father like son. He was never the academic type, he was only ever going to be a job that required physicality.

My father - who has no connection with my step uncle's family except through my mother - never really liked them and its easy to see why.

The only time I ever had any contact with that family was for family reasons - marriages or funerals - otherwise I stay well away. Their wedding ceremonies tended to be conspicuously massive, lavish, grandiose affairs, no expenses spared with huge country houses hired for the occasion and hundreds of guests. It was at such occasions I started to realise what sort of a world these people were living in. It didn't take a rocket scientist to realise there was and is now a great deal of masonic schenanigans in play - the mafia of the mediocre.

All of my step uncle's family are public sector employees. None of them work in the private sector. All four of my step cousins (his children) married public sector employees - more police, nurses and teachers. That family remind me very much of the Corleone's in The Godfather, except they wear the uniforms. Their expolitation of he public purse verges on the criminal with behaviour like nepotism, corruption and cronyism, but have carefully cloaked themselves under the righteous veil of being the police.

Its very clear to anyone who looks that they have had their snouts in the trough taking the public purse for everything they can get, in the knowledge the old boys network will protect them. Their protected plunder has made them unbearably smug and cocky and that's why I don't like mixing with them. Its very evident one of their biggest motivations for joining the police is the short service pension - where you serve a short career and walk away with a very comfortable pension from your mid-forties. Other attractions are the expenses they can claim.

Before my grandfather's death, he became irate at their constant visits. My grandfather lived on one of the main roads west out of Cardiff and that gave them a very convenient excuse to drop by on their way home. My parents lived only 100 yards away. Only once in blue moon did they ever drop by to see them. For my poor grandfather, never a day went by without at least one visit from them, often it was three or four visits, sometimes it was a dozen. Reason? Did an inheritance have anything to do with it? you bet it did. They were currying favour.

Eventually their constant, mercillessly-repetitive visiting angered my grandfather. By contrast, me and my two brothers wouldn't visit our own grandfather because we knew our uber-aggressive, uber-domineering step uncle's family would turn up, guaranteed to take control of the situation leaving us to be ignored. My grandfather became upset he rarely saw his own blood grandchildren thanks to the selfishness of his step grandchildren. The result was that on his death my mother got half his estate - not the quarter she expected.

My mother's sister had passed away some years before and we expected my grandfather to divide his estate up into 3 instead of 4; one third for my mother and the other two thirds for my mother two step sisters.

Justice prevailed and my grandfather took what little retribution he could by denying the scheming sociopaths what the plunder they'd been wringing their hands over all those years. Good on him and may God rest his soul.

Anyone who has seen the TV series Dexter may recognise some of what I've mentioned here - manipulating the sanctity of your choosen profession's aura to conduct clandestine schemes in diametric opposition to your profession's purpose. I don't think a word yet exists to describe this phenomenon does, there?

Are they good at their jobs though?

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Everyone's always going on about retirement, but seriously what's wrong with work. Most bloke I know who have retired at 65 have a great time for 6 weeks with their days filled with activities, potter around the house getting bored for a further 2 weeks and then go back to their old job part time.

Can't actually say that I'm that bothered about retiring, from statistics I've seen, people retiring young also die young - especially men.

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Don't they retire cos they've done the 40 years you can put into your pension pot?

Certainly the police and armed services are entitled to full pension after much less than 40 years service, about 25 IIRC.

You just wonder how many people stick to their public sector jobs just because of the attraction of a pension, how inefficient it makes them in their jobs and how much extra burden the tax payer is saddled with.

Huge numbers of private sector pension schemes have change to money-purchase and that has removed the link between salary/length of service and pension payment for them.

Make no mistake, public sector pensions are yet another form of social security the tax payer could very much do without.

Edited by Dave Spart

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Public Sector Pension Bill (£43,000 Per Household)

YES!!!

Come on then, where is all my praise? ___ I like praise ------ ALL HAIL

Who said on some distant lost thread weeks ago that the mark for the system falling apart will be when many in the public sector are be queuing at the courts for none payment of the crippling council tax that pays (some of) them?

& that the ex-private sector will be on benefits.

Up, orifice, vanishes........... in any order you like.

& between us we have three offspring + one DinL .. all teachers or military.

Degrees out of their ears & all producing sweet F.A.

Well I sure aint paying for 'em.....are you?

Edited by Laura

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75% of council tax is used to pay public sector and civil servant's full salary pensions.

I work hard to so that the above get to retire in luxury and in return I'll be lucky to afford food when I retire.

If I had my way full salary pensions would be stopped immediately which would probably cause a general strike!

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First order of business for the Conservatives when they get in, decimate the public sector. Can you imagine the whinging from the BBC and the Guardian. Incidentally why is their no news on the BBC about the Labour MP who sucked up £500,000 of expenses.

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First order of business for the Conservatives when they get in, decimate the public sector. Can you imagine the whinging from the BBC and the Guardian. Incidentally why is their no news on the BBC about the Labour MP who sucked up £500,000 of expenses.

First order of business for the Conservatives is to worry about paying any bills once the Scottish Nationalists declare independence and scarper with all the oil.

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Currently 2/3 of policemen retire by the age of 50 due to poor health !

Most likely just indicative of the demands of modern policing and the type of vermin which the police are expected to deal with on the publics behalf ...

The sooner we arm them the better imo .

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The sooner we arm them the better imo .

As long as they are first programmed to forget political correctness & accountability, then I agree.

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Guest happy?
House prices and negative equity are just the tip of the iceberg. We really are bancrupt as a nation.

City wire

Indeed. Whoever taught you English should be required to return their obviously unjustified pension. There we go, one public sector pension refunded already, should soon have the PSBR under control in no time.

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  • 399 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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